Clark State awarded over $99K to support financial aid for students in specific programs

Clark State College has been awarded over $99K to support financial aid for students in specific programs, including addiction treatment. Here, students Gracie Perkins, left, and Jasmin Alford study about addiction earlier this year in the Clark State Library. BILL LACKEY/STAFF
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Clark State College has been awarded over $99K to support financial aid for students in specific programs, including addiction treatment. Here, students Gracie Perkins, left, and Jasmin Alford study about addiction earlier this year in the Clark State Library. BILL LACKEY/STAFF

Credit: Bill Lackey

Credit: Bill Lackey

Grant will enable students to contribute to the Ohio workforce at an accelerated rate, official says.

Clark State College has been awarded $99,990 by the Ohio Department of Higher Education (ODHE) through a grant program.

The Short-Term Certificate Grant supports need-based financial aid to in-state students who are enrolled in a program that may be complete in less than a year, according to a release from the school.

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“This grant will allow students to earn certificates or an industry recognized credential in an in-demand field that will enable students to contribute to the Ohio workforce at an accelerated rate,” said Tiffany Hunter, Ph.D., Provost and vice president of academic affairs.

Hunter said students can receive the funds more than once, which allow them to earn more than one certificate or credential. Funds from the grant are available immediately and students can receive up to $3,000.

“This grant will truly have a positive impact on our students, the community, and our Ohio workforce as a whole,” she said.

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Short-term training programs will help fill vacancies or upskill current employees quickly. The program selected for the grant represent industries facing a need for skilled workers, including advanced manufacturing, healthcare, sales, information technology, transportation/logistics, addiction treatment, and food service.

“Training budgets are tight right now so being able to have some funding to assist those get the training they need is a big deal for our area,” said Gerritt Smith, director of Clark State Workforce and Business Solutions.

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