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Ohio part of 6-state effort to enforce move over laws

Ohio State Highway Patrol troopers from the Dayton Post investigate a single-vehicle crash Sunday evening, June 4, 2017, in which a car landed on its top on southbound Interstate 75 in Vandalia. MAX FILBY / STAFF
Ohio State Highway Patrol troopers from the Dayton Post investigate a single-vehicle crash Sunday evening, June 4, 2017, in which a car landed on its top on southbound Interstate 75 in Vandalia. MAX FILBY / STAFF

The Ohio State Highway Patrol will be a part of an upcoming effort to educate and enforce the move over law.

Ohio will collaborate with members of the Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Pennsylvania and West Virginia State Police Departments for the initiative, aimed to bring high-visibility enforcement of the Move Over law.

This initiative began on Sunday, July 19, and will end at 11:59 p.m. Saturday, July 25, according to a state patrol news release.

The move over law, which exists in all 50 states, requires all drivers to move over to an adjacent lane when approaching any vehicle with flashing or rotating lights parked on the roadside.

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According to the law, if moving over is not possible due to traffic or weather conditions, or because a second lane does not exist, motorists should slow down and proceed with caution.

“When drivers move over, they can help protect the lives of everyone who works on or uses Ohio’s roadways,” said Col. Richard S. Fambro, patrol superintendent. “When you see flashing lights, move over and slow down. It’s the law and the right thing to do.”

A study from 2015 to 2019 showed troopers were involved in 49 crashes that appeared to be related to violations of the move over law, according to the news release. As a result of these crashes, one civilian was killed and 49 officers and civilians were injured.

During the same five-year period, the Ohio state patrol has issued 23,429 move-over violation citations.

In 2019 alone, there were 14 move over violation-related crashes, the highest total over the five-year period.

According to the study, Montgomery County had 404 citations, Clark 514, Greene 452, Warren 846, Butler 197 and Preble 24.

“The 6-State Trooper Project is a multi-state law enforcement partnership aimed at providing combined and coordinated law enforcement and security services in the areas of highway safety, criminal patrol and intelligence sharing,” the news release says.