breaking news

Park Layne businesses rebuilt, thriving year after tornado

Hazing, alcohol issues force another Ohio State fraternity to close


A second fraternity has been suspended at Ohio State University following a months-long ban on all Interfraternity Council activities.

The Sigma Alpha Mu chapter at Ohio state was had its charter suspended by it international parent organization last week, according to an announcement.

The chapter ceased operations immediately on Friday and the length of the suspension was not released, according to the announcement. Both hazing and alcohol problems were cited as the main reasons for the charter suspension.

SPECIAL REPORT: Bad Frats: Schools take sweeping action to halt Greek life issues

“Our top priority is to create a healthy and safe environment for our members and to foster a culture of responsibility in our chapters,” said Executive Director Andy Huston. “We simply will not tolerate such violations of policies, expectations and values.”

Sigma Alpha Mu’s demise comes just a few months after Ohio State suspended all 37 IFC fraternities on campus.

In November, OSU suspended all recruitment, new member and social activities but school started lifting suspensions over the last two months. The group Zeta Psi is the only fraternity from that initial campus-wide ban that remains on full suspension, according to Ohio State’s greek life website.

RELATED: Colleges reap dividends from market rise but fear it won’t last

All other fraternities have been approved to again host recruitment events and all but three have been approved to have new member activities again. Ohio State has also approved 29 to begin hosting social gatherings again, according to its website.

In January, Ohio State suspended its Tau Kappa Epsilon chapter for three years after an investigation found violations of the student code of conduct had occurred. The investigation found the chapter was guilty of hazing, endangering behavior and improper use of alcohol, an OSU spokesman said last month.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in News

Park Layne businesses rebuilt, thriving year after tornado
Park Layne businesses rebuilt, thriving year after tornado

A Clark County community is still recovering from a massive storm with several tornadoes that caused serious damage to several local businesses a year ago. An EF-1 tornado, with winds of 100 miles per hour, struck businesses in Park Layne causing extensive damage to a Sunoco gas station, a Family Dollar store and the Mel-O-Dee, a popular restaurant...
Morgan Freeman friend defends actor after misconduct allegations, speaks out against accusers
Morgan Freeman friend defends actor after misconduct allegations, speaks out against accusers

At least eight women have accused actor Morgan Freeman of inappropriate behavior, according to a report from CNN. The women said the behavior happened on and off movie sets. >> Read more trending news  Freeman is an Academy Award-winning actor, but he's also a business owner in Clarksdale, Mississippi. Two blocks around the corner...
Fort Ancient, other Ohio sites step closer to World Heritage status
Fort Ancient, other Ohio sites step closer to World Heritage status

The Fort Ancient Earthworks in Warren County and other sites comprising Ohio’s Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks are big step closer to being designated as World Heritage sites. RELATED: Lawmakers join push for World Heritage status “The U.S. Department of the Interior is scheduled to publish a notice in the Federal Register tomorrow inviting...
Police: Driver finds gun stuck in front of his car
Police: Driver finds gun stuck in front of his car

Police said a driver on I-5 saw a "black object" moving through the air and, when he pulled over miles later, near Lakewood, Washington, he found a gun stuck in the front of his car.  The driver continued for about 18 miles after the object struck his car, and then stopped for gas, Washington Trooper Guy Gill said.  Photos show...
Scientists worry brain-wasting ‘zombie deer’ disease could spread to humans
Scientists worry brain-wasting ‘zombie deer’ disease could spread to humans

Deer across North America are dying from a mysterious disease that gradually destroys the animal’s nervous system, and scientists are concerned that the infection could spread to humans.  >> Read more trending news  Chronic wasting disease — or “zombie deer disease” — was first observed in 1967 in Fort...
More Stories