NEW: The Commemorative Air Force is flying another historic plane to the region

TBM Avenger torpedo bomber. Commemorative Air Force photo
TBM Avenger torpedo bomber. Commemorative Air Force photo

After bringing the World War II-era C47 called “That’s All, Brother” to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force for three days last week, the Commemorative Air Force plans to showcase another historic craft locally.

The Capital Wing of the Commemorative Air Force is bringing its Second World War TBM Avenger torpedo bomber to Grimes Field in Urbana for one day May 12.

Residents may buy a “warbird ride” in what the organization calls the “largest and heaviest single-engine bomber of WWII.”

Explore‘That’s All, Brother’ flies from history to Air Force Museum for three-day visit

“This is an opportunity for the public to sit in the same seats as did the crew of our warbird in WWII,” Pete Ballard, warbird rides coordinator for the Capital Wing, said in an announcement Monday. “And feel the same power of the 1,900 (horsepower) radial engine as they did. And smell the same smells they did.”

TBM Avenger torpedo bomber
TBM Avenger torpedo bomber

Credit: John Lackey

Credit: John Lackey

Providing these rides is a part of the Commemorative Air Force’s mission to honor the men and women who built, serviced and piloted the vintage World War II aircraft, Ballard said.

Flights must be purchased in advance at https://www.capitalwingwarbirdrides.org/. There will be no on-site ticket sales.

The Capital Wing TBM Avenger will provide all flights at the Urbana city-owned Grimes Field Airport, a mile north of Urbana on Ohio 68.

The General Motors Avenger’s warfare debut was at the Battle Midway in 1942, according to the World War II Museum in New Orleans.

The Avenger served as the U.S. Navy’s primary torpedo bomber, attacking enemy shipping and delivering ordnance on enemy positions across the Pacific, the museum said.

Based in Culpeper, Va., the Capital Wing and the Commemorative Air Force are non-profit 501(c)(3) organizations, the organizations say ticket purchases “may be tax deductible.”

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