Ohio’s Electoral College votes go to Trump as expected

Several Dayton-area Republican Ohio House of Representative candidates were joined by a Democrat in winning races Tuesday. FILE
Several Dayton-area Republican Ohio House of Representative candidates were joined by a Democrat in winning races Tuesday. FILE

Credit: FILE

Credit: FILE

Without drama or intrigue, Ohio’s 18 members of the Electoral College met in the Ohio Statehouse on Monday and cast their ballots for Republicans Donald Trump and Mike Pence, who won the statewide popular vote by 8 percentage points.

The 55th Ohio Electoral College meeting had a few twists designed to prevent the spread of the coronavirus: a plexiglass barrier installed on the dais, fist bumps instead of handshakes, face masks and person pens assigned to each elector.

ExploreElectoral College: Everything you need to know

Ohio’s electors are: Rob Scott of Kettering, Ken Blackwell of Cincinnati, Bonnie Ward of Waverly, Barbara Clark of Columbus, Keith Cheney of Lima, Mark Wagoner of Ottawa Hills, Dave Johnson of Salem, Joy Padgett of Coshocton, Patti Alderson of West Chester, Steve Loomis of Cleveland, LeeAnn Johnson, Robert Paduchik of Westerville, Karen Arshinkoff of Hudson, James Wert of Lyndhurst, Jim Canepa of Dublin, Jane Timken of Canton. Statewide electors are Madison Gesiotto of Canton and Ryan Stenger of Canton.

The Constitution provides each state one elector for each member of the House of Representatives and one for each senator. Currently, there are 538, including three from the District of Columbia and 270 are needed to win the presidency. All but two states award electoral votes on a winner-take-all basis.

ExploreElection 2020: Ohio's shift to red continues

The newly elected Congress meets in a joint session on Jan. 6 to officially count the electoral ballots. The new president is inaugurated on Jan. 20.

Electors are typically staunch partisans selected by the parties — if not chosen outright by the nominee’s campaign.

The National Popular Vote Interstate Compact, which has been passed by 15 states and the District of Columbia, is a system for states to pledge electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote, regardless of who won the state vote. States representing 196 electoral votes have adopted the compact, which would take effect when it’s enacted by states with an additional 74 electoral votes.

A bill pending in the Ohio House to have Ohio join the compact has stalled and is not expected to win approval.

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