Ohio part of birth control app launch that teenagers can use


An app for ordering birth control that’s delivered to your home is expanding to Ohio.

Nurx, a San Francisco-based telemedicine startup, launched its app this week and said birth control is free or the cost of an insurance co-pay for those with insurance and for self pay it starts at $15.

The app lets women order contraception without an in-person doctor visit. The three-year-old company stated that making birth control more accessible helps reduce unintended pregnancies.

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“Research shows that the easier and more affordable birth control is, the more women will use it,” stated Hans Gangeskar, co-founder and CEO of Nurx.

Nurx joins a series of startups that have variations of birth control ordering or refilling apps, like Maven, Glow, PillPack, and Planned Parenthood’s app.

The minimum age is 12 years old to use the Nurx app, though some state regulations make that age higher.

Nurx states that for women over the age of 50, its best to see your regular doctor because of increased risks with hormonal contraception.

The app also can be used to order pre-exposure prophylaxis, which is a daily medication to prevent HIV, like for people with a partner that is HIV positive or other high risk factors.

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Patients use the app by choosing their birth control type and brand, answering medical questions online and entering insurance information.

A physician reviews the information and issues the prescription. Nurx states the doctors are licensed in the user’s state.

Anyone getting a prescription through Nurx can also talk to a doctor by messaging, phone or video.

The app is available in Ohio, Indiana, Texas, California, New York, Washington state, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Virginia, Florida, Missouri, Michigan, Minnesota, and Washington D.C.

Nurx also said it plans to expand to more than 20 states in the coming weeks.



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