Allegiant pilots vote to strike: How will it impact local flights?


A dispute over a scheduling system has led to a possible pilot strike at Allegiant Air.

The low-cost air carrier has been meeting with the pilot union for nearly two years to resolve a conflict over a scheduling system. The union says the system does not take seniority and preferences of pilots into account for scheduling.

More than 93 percent of Allegiant pilots said they’re willing to strike to resolve the problem, according to representatives for the Airline Pilots Assn., Teamsters Local 1224. The vote authorizes the pilots union to strike “if it becomes necessary.” 

» RELATED: 5 things to know about Allegiant at Dayton airport

If Allegiant pilots did strike, the effects would be felt at local airports including the Dayton International Airport and the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. Allegiant flew more than 51,000 passengers out of the Dayton airport last year, and has seen tremendous growth since entering the market in 2016.

“Since Allegiant began flying out of Dayton ... the flights have been extremely popular with regional travelers,” said Terrence Slaybaugh, director of the Dayton International Airport, in a previous interview.

» MUST-READ TRAVEL NEWS: 7 major changes at the Dayton airport in 2017

Allegiant serves more than 24 markets from the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport. Allegiant’s passenger traffic grew more than 20 percent in 2017 at CVG. Allegiant also serves the Columbus airport.

The Las Vegas-based low-cost airline came from humble beginnings in 1999, when it had just one aircraft that served one route. Now, the company has more than 80 aircraft with more than 300 routes across the country.

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