New marker honors Revolutionary War father, son

A new marker honoring Revolutionary War veterans and father and son John H. Garlough and John Garlough Jr. was dedicated on Saturday at Garlough Cemetery in Green Township. Lori Garlough of Florida represented her father-in-law Dr. Robert Garlough, who funded the new marker and led the dedication. Local members of the Sons of the American Revolution, Daughters of the American Revolution and Marine Corps League Honor Guard supported the ceremony.

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A new marker honoring Revolutionary War veterans and father and son John H. Garlough and John Garlough Jr. was dedicated on Saturday at Garlough Cemetery in Green Township. Lori Garlough of Florida represented her father-in-law Dr. Robert Garlough, who funded the new marker and led the dedication. Local members of the Sons of the American Revolution, Daughters of the American Revolution and Marine Corps League Honor Guard supported the ceremony.

A connection between Ohio and Florida has resulted in the memory of a Clark County father and son who served in the Revolutionary War being preserved for years to come.

An obelisk monument was dedicated on Saturday morning to replace a crumbling one at the Garlough Cemetery in Green Township honoring John Henry Garlough and his son John H. Garlough Jr., who fought during the country’s formative years. The new monument was financed by Dr. Robert Garlough, a descendent living in Florida and was represented here by his daughter-in-law Lori Garlough.

Members of the Lagonda Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, George Rogers Clark Chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution and Honor Guard members of Marine Corps League H. Eugene “Doak” Walker No. 963 also participated in the ceremony.

The occasion came as a result of two parties seeing a similar need. Dr. Garlough, who was born in Medway in 1926 and now lives in Vero Beach, Fla., traveled here to visit relatives four years ago and was struck by the condition of his ancestors’ markers and inspired to donate a new one.

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Meanwhile, John and Diane Eichelberger, members of the SAR and Honor Guard and DAR respectively, who live nearby, also noticed the condition of the markers and contacted a cemetery trustee who had also been in contact with the Garloughs.

“We had the same thought process and was just a coincidence,” said Diane Eichelberger. “We had a phone conversation that was fruitful. Our groups know how important it is to honor all service members and worked with district representatives to help with this wonderful monument which is a testament to faith and service.”

As Dr. Garlough is unable to travel due to his age, Lori Garlough represented the family. The Garloughs have a long tradition of military service with Dr. Garlough having served in the U.S. Air Force and his son Robert Garlough, Lori’s husband, is a retired U.S. Marine.

“I’m humbled and a little nervous,” she said, telling the tale of her family’s ancestors and how the monument came about. “(Dr. Garlough) really wanted this to be done in his lifetime.”

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John H. Garlough was born in 1728 in Germany and emigrated to Maryland in 1749 and enlisted in the Continental Army in 1778. John Jr. was born in 1763 and enlisted in 1782.

Following the war, the Garloughs came to Ohio, settling in Green Township to farm. John H. died in 1810 and John Jr. in 1823 and both are buried on the family’s farm land, which eventually became the cemetery.

SAR members also presented at the ceremony, which was capped by a 21-gun salute and the playing of “Taps.” Lori Garlough said it was wonderful to have these groups represented at the event.

The hope is for this to be a reminder of Clark County’s past and those who helped build it. David Farrell, a former township trustee who lives in the area, brought his son Evan, 12, to appreciate it and would like to see more done to restore other markers at the cemetery that are crumbling, many from the 1800s.

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