Clark County Common Pleas Court launches updated website


The Clark County Common Pleas Court’s case management system is up and running.

Clark County Common Pleas Court Clerk Melissa Tuttle said the public now has access to the new website.

“Updating the computer system and the case management system helps how we intake documents and helps the document storage,” she said. “We are upgrading and improving and trying to utilize everything so the public can get better access to what gets filed and it helps my staff do their job faster. “

MORE: Part of Clark County Pleas Court Clerk’s Office set to close for 3 days

The general public can access the new website, which is powered by CourtView, by logging onto the county’s website (www.clarkcountyohio.gov), selecting the clerk of courts tab under “My Government”, clicking on the legal department and accepting the terms and conditions.

The new process will help those in the legal profession and the general public, Tuttle said.

“Attorneys like to know when things are mailed or faxed in that they have it done and so they check in on the case to see if the judge has made an entry or any orders and it really helps the public know what’s going on in their case and they can follow up online,” she said.

While it is possible to see if motions or rulings have been filed from the website, it does not offer images of the documents. To see the actual documents, a person must either show up in person at the office or request the document from the office and pay a fee.

The public is always welcomed to come in and view the public records, Tuttle said.

TRENDING: Clark County Common Pleas Court cases

The Clark County Clerk of Courts office closed for three business days in June to make the transition and for about a month Clark County was left without a website where attorneys and the public could check cases online. Tuttle said in a letter to the public that the outage had caused more work for her staff.

“This delay has increased calls, faxes, emails, mailings, and personal interactions to verify records,” a letter to the public said. “This has caused a heavy burden on the clerk’s office.”

She said she is relieved that the website is now up.

The cost of the project is about $207,000, Tuttle said, and all of it is being paid for by a grant from the Ohio Supreme Court.

Along with providing access to the public, the new system will also help the clerk’s employees focus their time on serving the public, said Jeffrey Harmon, the general manager for Equivalent, the owner of the CourtView system.

“We know our customers spend valuable time and resources fulfilling requests from the public for access to Court records,” he said in a previous statement. “Clark County’s new solution will free up staff with tailored modules, preferences, parameters, codes and security to support their unique needs.”



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