Greenon boys killed in crash remembered as compassionate, committed

One of the Greenon High School football coaches touches Connor Williams’ casket as the coarches walk off the field after speaking during a joint funeral for student athletes Connor and David Waag at school’s football stadium Friday. Connor and David were killed in a car accident last Sunday. Bill Lackey/Staff

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One of the Greenon High School football coaches touches Connor Williams’ casket as the coarches walk off the field after speaking during a joint funeral for student athletes Connor and David Waag at school’s football stadium Friday. Connor and David were killed in a car accident last Sunday. Bill Lackey/Staff

Two Clark County students who died in a car crash were remembered Friday at their funeral for being committed student-athletes who always showed love and compassion.

Senior David Waag, 17, played soccer at Greenon High School. Sophomore Connor Williams, 15, played football at Greenon while attending classes at the Global Impact STEM Academy in Springfield.

RELATED: Greenon, Global Impact STEM Academy students killed in crash

About 1,200 people gathered at the Greenon football stadium Friday as family and friends mourned the death of the boys but also celebrated their lives. Greenon Assistant Football Coach John Jewell spoke about Connor’s work ethic and personality.

“He always said, ‘Yes, sir; no, sir.’ He always gave a maximum effort every time,” Jewell said. “The great thing about Connor is, he did it with a smile. He was always smiling. Everything we did.”

The boys were killed Sunday afternoon when they were in the back seat of a car traveling on Wilkerson Road between Fairborn and Yellow Springs. The driver allegedly lost control and the car hit a tree before rolling over, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

The driver and front-seat passenger both had on their seat belts. They suffered non-life threatening injuries and were transported to the Soin Medical Center.

MORE: Greenon community grieves for 2 athletes killed in crash

David and Connor weren’t wearing seat belts, according to the state patrol report. They were pronounced dead at the scene, according to the patrol.

Neither drugs nor alcohol appear to be factors in the crash, according to the state patrol.

Jewell told a story about when Connor came to practice once despite not feeling well. He was forced to leave early and doctors later found he had strep throat. Though he was sick, Connor still made it to practice because he was committed to the team and his teammates, Jewell said.

Connor’s mother, Becky, spoke briefly. She read a poem that was directed to Connor telling him that he left too soon and she will always love him.

“Thank you, everybody, for all your love and support,” she said after the poem.

READ MORE: Greenon students killed in crash to be honored by NASCAR team

David was remembered as a hard-working young man.

“They both lived life to the fullest and no less,” Pastor Marshall Weil said of David and Connor.

David was a three-year varsity letterman at Greenon High School, and member of Ohio Galaxies FC and was looking forward to the upcoming high school season and his senior year.

The Greenon soccer and football team didn’t play any games this week. The football game scheduled against Pleasant for Friday won’t be made up. The teams will start playing again next week.

David is survived by his mother Aryn, sister Cheyanne, grandparents and other family members.

Connor is survived by his parents; grandparents; sister, Devin Williams; brother, Corey Williams and other family members.

The funeral finished with players from each sports team serving as pallbearers. The students picked up the caskets that were close to the sidelines near the stands and carried them to waiting hearses. The families of the two young men followed behind them.

Family members wiped away tears while members of the sports teams placed the caskets in the car and held each other while crying

Weil was Connor’s pastor, he told stories about how Connor would ask deep questions during small group discussions at church. He said he hoped Connor was now asking God those questions and getting amazing answers.

He finished his part by telling the families that their boys loved them as much as they loved the boys. He reminded Connor’s family that the teen would always say, ‘Bye, I love you,’ before leaving a room.

“Will you please remember him by those words?” he asked them.

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