Clark State agriculture program to offer cannabis course in spring

Clark State College's agriculture program will offer a cannabis course in spring of 2022.
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Clark State College's agriculture program will offer a cannabis course in spring of 2022.

It will cover various topics on industry, which is new in Ohio and likely to grow, professor says.

Clark State College’s agriculture program has added a new cannabis course that will be offered in spring of 2022.

The Global Awareness course, Cannabis (AGR 1175) is a three-credit hour course that will cover various topics including historical and modern use of cannabis, use in modern society, economy, politics, medical effects of cannabis, evolution, classification and growth of the cannabis plant, according to a release from the college.

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“Since it is still illegal at the federal level and in some states, it is considered a part of the ‘shadow economy’ so we will discuss that as well political systems because in one state it may be legal and in the next state it could be a jailable offense,” said Arly Drake, Ph.D., assistant professor of agriculture.

The course was added because there has been an increased interest in cannabis now that it’s legal in Ohio for medical purposes, Drake said.

“There are a couple of cannabis grow operations local to the area and there are jobs available in this field,” she said. “I believe to an extent that acknowledging that while it is a new industry, it is likely here to stay and grow. This course helps us to remain progressive and relevant to our industry.”

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Drake said the course will touch on some adult topics and some of the negative aspects of cannabis use. She said there are other social aspects to cannabis including the culture surrounding its use and how its perception by the public has changed over time.

“I think for our students it means they will be exposed to some differing opinions, some of our history and certain aspects of our society that might be a bit taboo in some other courses,” she said.

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