93,031 cases, 3,515 deaths from coronavirus reported in Ohio

In an undated image provided by NIAID, a colored micrograph of the coronavirus, with its distinct protein spikes in red. In a laboratory in New York City, researchers coaxed a key piece of the coronavirus — its infamous outer “spike” — to mutate so that it became invisible to disease-fighting antibodies, underscoring the need for treatments and vaccines that attack the virus in different ways, so that if the pathogen manages to evade one approach, another will be waiting in the wings. (NIAID via The New York Times) -- NO SALES; FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY WITH NYT STORY VIRUS MUTATIONS BY KATHERINE J. WU FOR JULY 28, 2020. ALL OTHER USE PROHIBITED. --
In an undated image provided by NIAID, a colored micrograph of the coronavirus, with its distinct protein spikes in red. In a laboratory in New York City, researchers coaxed a key piece of the coronavirus — its infamous outer “spike” — to mutate so that it became invisible to disease-fighting antibodies, underscoring the need for treatments and vaccines that attack the virus in different ways, so that if the pathogen manages to evade one approach, another will be waiting in the wings. (NIAID via The New York Times) -- NO SALES; FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY WITH NYT STORY VIRUS MUTATIONS BY KATHERINE J. WU FOR JULY 28, 2020. ALL OTHER USE PROHIBITED. --

There have been 93,031 cases and 3,529 deaths reported from coronavirus in Ohio as of Sunday, July 2. A total of 944 new cases have been reported by the Ohio Department of Health.

87,218 cases and 3,246 deaths have been confirmed by the state. Since March, a total of people have been 10,900 hospitalized and 2,557 people have been admitted to an intensive care unit. An estimated 68,394 people have recovered.

As schools approach reopening, many districts are discussing their plans and trying to make plans to avoid the spread of the virus.

ExploreSchools going back in-person must navigate many logistical hurdles

Public Health – Dayton & Montgomery County recommended that all K-12 schools in the county start the school year remotely and discontinue “high-risk extracurricular activities” such as band, choir, theater and contact sports. Officials cited an observed increased spread of the coronavirus, and noted that the county had a higher percent of school-age cases of COVID-19 than the state as a whole as well as the five other largest counties in Ohio.

Numerous area schools have already delayed their first day of classes to allow time for staff training, whether that be in how to safely hold in-person classes or how to use online teaching systems. Many schools have landed on Sept. 8, the day after Labor Day, as a good day to start the school year.