Bengals linebacker considered one of the NFL’s best against the pass

CINCINNATI, OH - DECEMBER 18:  Vincent Rey #57 of the Cincinnati Bengals celebrates after making a defensive stop during the second quarter of the game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Paul Brown Stadium on December 18, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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CINCINNATI, OH - DECEMBER 18: Vincent Rey #57 of the Cincinnati Bengals celebrates after making a defensive stop during the second quarter of the game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Paul Brown Stadium on December 18, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Credit: Andy Lyons

Credit: Andy Lyons

One might make the argument that Vincent Rey is the most effective linebacker among the Bengals, which would probably raise some eyebrows with Vontaze Burfict playing nearby, but football heads at Pro Football Focus probably wouldn’t argue. They sure like Rey as a pass defender.

According to PFF, which is beginning to flood the airways with player and unit rankings, and nuggets of information as NFL training camps are three weeks away, Rey -- who started 12 games last season and played in all 16 -- was the league’s stingiest LB in coverage last season.

Most versions of the Bengals’ current depth chart list newcomer Mike Minter as the starting middle linebacker, with Burfict on the weakside and Marquis Flowers on the strongside. Minter (6-feet, 246 pounds) signed with Cincinnati as a free agent in March, and some feel he’ll supplant Rey (6-2, 240) in the middle.

That may take some work once training camp begins three weeks from today, July 28, at Paul Brown Stadium. Rey has been around -- a lot.

Since joining the team in 2010 as an undrafted free agent out of Duke, he played in two games as a rookie and then every game since.

Last season, he was in on 86 tackles, 51 of them solos, broke up seven passes, and added an interception and a fumble recovery. Rey led the Bengals in tackles in 2014 and ‘15 and remains the only player in franchise history to log three sacks and an interception in one game. Plus, he was captain of the special teams.

Well, if business slows in the linebacking business, Rey may have options behind the microphone rather than in front of it.

Here’s what ESPN had to say when looking at the best broadcasting prospect for each NFL team:

“Rey may not be a big name, but he's one of the go-to players for reporters because of his unique insight. Rey has a way of providing big picture answers in easy, digestible terms, which would translate well to TV.”

So, there’s that.

What do you think fans?

Rey stays busy on all downs, and year-round.

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