Meet master gardeners at event this weekend

Garden and Arboretum Jubilee renews summer tradition.


A former Springfield summer tradition has been reseeded and is ready to grow again in a new location.

The first Snyder Park Garden and Arboretum Jubilee will offer countless varieties of plants in six gardens to be explored, a variety of speakers, how-to topics, kids’ activities, free food and live music, 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 5, rain or shine.

››MORE SPRINGFIELD THINGS TO DO: Underground Railroad railroad stop paintings

The jubilee is presented by the Ohio State University Clark County Extension Office, and admission is free.

The Gateway Garden Jubilee was a Springfield summer staple the first Saturday in August for several years when the extension office was at its previous location. But given it was in a corporate park, there were limitations, which is no longer the case now.

“It’s like heaven for us being here. This will be an overall different feel,” said Pam Bennett, Clark County Extension Office co-director. “This is a much greater area for activities.”

The area includes a victory garden, an early Ohio settler’s garden, the Garden of Eatin’ and a children’s garden. The latter is through a partnership between the Hollandia Gardens Association and Springfield Kiwanis.

The clubhouse will offer a variety of speakers every half-hour during the event. Topics will include how to deal with garden pests, gardening with arthritis and tips for environmentally friendly gardens and others.

Master gardener volunteers will also give demonstrations, and vendors and exhibits will round out the jubilee.

The gardens were created as way of using the former Snyder Park Golf Course and are maintained by National Trail Parks and Recreation.

Bennett said the extension office’s partnership with National Trail is a blessing and the future looks promising: “Our jubilee has always been our gift back to the community. The sky’s the limit in terms of potential. There’s so much space I can only see it growing.”

Contact this contributing writer at bturner004@woh.rr.com.



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