Nathan Bostick, Chris Lingane and Madison Crawford show off a bridge they built at one of the recent John Hopkins University engineering program classes. SUBMITTED PHOTO

Clark State offering unique high school engineering program

For the third consecutive year, the Johns Hopkins University’s Engineering Innovation program will give students with aptitudes for math and science four weeks’ of engineering instruction worth college credit.

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The non-residential day program will be held June 26 through July 21 at Clark State’s Leffel Lane campus.

Clark State is one of just 13 schools nationwide to offer the Engineering Innovation program and the only one offered in the Midwest. The school is one of only three community colleges involved and lucky to offer this, said Kanesha Hall, manager of STEM programming for Clark State.

“It’s a great way to get to see labs, for students to meet their peers and exposure to several types of engineering,” she said. “It’s opened their eyes.”

Students from various area high schools have participated.

The programs, created by Johns Hopkins School of engineering faculty, will cover chemical, mechanical, civil and electrical engineering. The instructor will be Clark State’s Cherish Lesko and guests from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base will teach about robotics.

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Madison Crawford, a 2016 Northeastern High school graduate, was part of the first class in 2015. It was the tipping point for her future, she said.

“I wasn’t really sure what I wanted to do. I knew I loved science and math and I ended up loving engineering,” Crawford said.

She currently studies petroleum engineering at Marietta University, earning a 3.92 GPA in her first year. She would like to someday supervise drilling and extraction on oil rigs. Ultimately, she’d like to give back to the program.

It is funded by local philanthropist Rosalyn Bullock in honor of her late husband, Willis Bullock and attorney Dan Harkins.

Crawford said for students who show a strong work ethic, the will be the right path to a multitude of engineering fields.

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A special part of the program will be a one-day trip to the Johns Hopkins campus in Baltimore. Participants can tour the university, speed network with practicing engineers, interact with students and attend a college-level lecture.

The final day of the program allows students to test their skills in a group bridge engineering competition, competing live against other programs across the country to see how they compare.

The public event will be held 10:15 a.m. July 21 at the Clark State Performing Arts Center’s Kuss Auditorium.

The program is limited to 24 students. To be accepted into the Clark State program, students must have completed algebra II, trigonometry and at least one basic lab science course, such as biology, chemistry or physics, with grades of “B” or better.

Tuition is free to accepted students from Clark, Madison, Miami, Montgomery, Green, Logan, and Champaign Counties. Scholarships also are available to qualified students from other areas.

For more information on the program, contact Hall at 937-328-6079 or go to https://engineering.jhu.edu/ei/apply-engineering-innovation-clark-state-community-college/.

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