Health


Mom warns of sunless heatstroke after toddler almost doesn't wake up from nap

A Canadian mother is warning other parents about the dangers of indoor heatstroke after her daughter endured a frightening ordeal. Jennifer Abma of Edmonton, Alberta, told "Today" that she was keeping her daughters inside when a heatwave hit their town. Her 3-year-old daughter, Anastasia, went upstairs to take a nap a few weeks ago after playing with her 1-year-old sister. An hour...
Active ingredient in sunscreen could cause cancer

Active ingredient in sunscreen could cause cancer

There's a health warning about a chemical found in most sunscreens. A new study found that when that chemical comes into contact with sun and chlorine, it can become toxic. If you flip over your sunscreen, chances are avobenzone is first ingredient you'll find. In fact, Boston's WFXT went into a couple of drug stores and found the vast majority of the sunscreens on the shelves have this...

Idaho family sues US after child sprayed by cyanide trap

An Idaho couple has sued the U.S. government, saying their teenage son still suffers headaches after a predator-killing trap that federal workers mistakenly placed near their home doused him with cyanide. Mark and Theresa Mansfield of Pocatello filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S. District Court in Idaho seeking more than $75,000 in economic damages and more than $75,000 for pain and suffering. Their...
‘Are you dead, sir?’: Video shows ER doctor mocking, berating patient with anxiety

‘Are you dead, sir?’: Video shows ER doctor mocking, berating patient with anxiety

A California hospital has permanently removed an emergency room doctor from its roster after she was caught on video mocking a man who was likely in withdrawal from his anxiety medication.  Samuel Bardwell, 20, went to El Camino Hospital in Los Gatos June 11 after suffering a panic attack after basketball practice, his father, Donald Bardwell, told the San Francisco Chronicle. Donald Bardwell...
Lower costs, fewer benefits in new health insurance option

Lower costs, fewer benefits in new health insurance option

The Trump administration's new health insurance option offers lower premiums for small businesses and self-employed people, but the policies are likely to cover fewer benefits. Another caveat: if healthy people flock to the new plans as expected, premiums will rise for those who need comprehensive coverage. President Donald Trump and Labor Secretary Alex Acosta rolled out their final blueprint for...
UK reviews medical marijuana ban after outcry over sick kids

UK reviews medical marijuana ban after outcry over sick kids

The British government announced Tuesday it would move to lift its ban on cannabis-based medicines, amid mounting criticism over the denial of treatment to severely epileptic children. But it rejected calls to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Home Secretary Sajid Javid told lawmakers cases like that of a 12-year-old epileptic boy denied cannabis oil for his condition showed there is "...
Some fear changes to state laws as US weighs pot medicine

Some fear changes to state laws as US weighs pot medicine

Some American parents who for years have used cannabis to treat severe forms of epilepsy in their children are feeling more cautious than celebratory as U.S. regulators near a decision on whether to approve the first drug derived from the marijuana plant. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected to issue a decision by the end of the month on the drug Epidiolex, made by GW Pharmaceuticals...
Smoking hits new low; about 14 percent of US adults light up

Smoking hits new low; about 14 percent of US adults light up

Smoking in the U.S. has hit another all-time low. About 14 percent of U.S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show. There hadn't been much change the previous two years, but it's been clear there's been a general decline and the new figures show it's continuing, said K. Michael Cummings of the tobacco research program at Medical University...
Studies show groundwater holding own against drilling boom

Studies show groundwater holding own against drilling boom

New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. Energy companies have drilled more than 11,000 wells since arriving en masse in 2008, making Pennsylvania the nation's No. 2 gas-producing state after Texas. Residents who live near the gas wells, along...

GOP, Dem governors back benefits for pre-existing conditions

A bipartisan group of governors is speaking out against a Trump administration decision that could narrow access to health insurance benefits for those with pre-existing conditions. Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich (KAY'-sik), Democratic Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper and the governors of Alaska, Pennsylvania, Nevada, North Carolina, Montana, Washington and Maryland issued a joint statement Monday...
World Health Organization declares gaming disorder official condition, publishes diagnosis criteria

World Health Organization declares gaming disorder official condition, publishes diagnosis criteria

Parents may think their children are addicted to video games. now The World Health Organization has declared it a new mental health condition.  Specifically, the WHO has listed gaming disorder as a condition in the 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases, CNN reported. The WHO announcedlast year that it was going to include the disorder in the latest edition. Dr. Vladimir...
Critics scoff at UK govt claim of Brexit spending dividend

Critics scoff at UK govt claim of Brexit spending dividend

British Prime Minister Theresa May unveiled details Monday of a plan to boost health care funding by 3.4 percent a year, saying a "Brexit dividend" of cost savings would partly pay for the increase. Opponents welcomed the extra spending, but said claims that Britain would get an economic lift from leaving the European Union were false. May said in a speech that the cash-strapped National...
Rendell, ex-Pennsylvania governor, says he has Parkinson's

Rendell, ex-Pennsylvania governor, says he has Parkinson's

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell said Monday that he was diagnosed 3½ years ago with Parkinson's disease, but said he believes that treatment has stopped the progression of the disease and he has maintained his quality of life. The 74-year-old Rendell made the announcement at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia with officials and doctors from the University of Pennsylvania as part of a...

Epileptic boy's case sparks UK review of medical pot laws

British Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says Britain must quickly review its policies on medical marijuana use in light of the case of a 12-year-old boy whose mother says he needs cannabis oil to prevent dangerous seizures. British officials intervened over the weekend to allow the boy to use cannabis oil even though it is banned in Britain. His mother said his life was in danger and clinicians said...
Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

Obsessive video gamers know how to anticipate dangers in virtual worlds. The World Health Organization says they now should be on guard for a danger in the real world: spending too much time playing. In its latest revision to a disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a mental health condition. The statement confirmed...
UK PM vows big funding increase for National Health Service

UK PM vows big funding increase for National Health Service

British Prime Minister Theresa May has announced a significant funding increase for the country's beleaguered National Health Service. The prime minister said the NHS will receive an additional 384 million pounds ($510 million) per week once Britain leaves the European Union next March. She linked the increased funding to Brexit in a column published in the Mail on Sunday. May says "As we leave...
Mother of sick boy seeks legalization of medical marijuana

Mother of sick boy seeks legalization of medical marijuana

The mother of an epileptic boy at the center of a debate over medical marijuana in the U.K. is calling for an urgent meeting with ministers to discuss liberalizing British policy. Charlotte Caldwell said Sunday she also wants assurances from the government that her 12-year-old son Billy will be able to keep receiving cannabis oil once a 20-day emergency supply approved by the government runs out....
Pope: Abortion is 'white glove' equivalent to Nazi crimes

Pope: Abortion is 'white glove' equivalent to Nazi crimes

Pope Francis denounced abortion on Saturday as the "white glove" equivalent of the Nazi-era eugenics program and urged families to accept the children that God gives them. Francis spoke off-the-cuff to a meeting of an Italian family association, ditching his prepared remarks to speak from the heart about families and the trials they undergo. He lamented how some couples choose not to have...
UK changes course, allows epileptic boy to use cannabis oil

UK changes course, allows epileptic boy to use cannabis oil

The British government changed course Saturday in a case concerning cannabis oil, saying an epileptic boy can be treated with it after his mother said he needed it to survive severe seizures. Home Secretary Sajid Javid said he has agreed to urgently issue a license to allow Billy Caldwell, a 12-year-old from Northern Ireland, to be treated with the oil. He said his decision was based on advice from...
California moves to clear coffee of cancer-risk stigma

California moves to clear coffee of cancer-risk stigma

California officials, having concluded coffee drinking is not a risky pastime, are proposing a regulation that will essentially tell consumers of America's favorite beverage they can drink up without fear. The unprecedented action Friday by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment to propose a regulation to clear coffee of the stigma that it could pose a toxic risk followed a review of...

State appeals court reinstates California's right-to-die law

A state appeals court has reinstated — at least for now — California's law allowing terminally ill people to end their lives. The Fourth District Court of Appeals in Riverside issued an immediate stay Friday putting the End of Life Option back into effect. The court also gave opponents of its decision until July 2 to file objections. The law allows adults to obtain a prescription for life-ending...
California moves to declare coffee safe from cancer risk

California moves to declare coffee safe from cancer risk

California officials bucked a recent court ruling Friday and offered reassurance to concerned coffee drinkers that their fix won't give them cancer. The unprecedented action by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment to propose a regulation to essentially clear coffee of the stigma that it could pose a toxic risk followed a review of more than 1,000 studies published this week by the...
Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes charged with criminal fraud

Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes charged with criminal fraud

Federal prosecutors indicted Elizabeth Holmes on criminal fraud charges for allegedly defrauding investors, doctors and the public as the head of the once-heralded blood-testing startup Theranos. Federal prosecutors also brought charges against the company's former second-in-command. Holmes, who was once considered a wunderkind of Silicon Valley, and her former Chief Operating Officer Ramesh Balwani...

Ex-hospice supervisor pleads guilty in $60M fraud scheme

A former hospice nursing supervisor in North Texas has pleaded guilty to her role in a $60 million health care fraud scheme that prosecutors allege involved overdosing patients for profit. Jessica Love pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit health care fraud as part of an agreement filed Monday. Love worked as a registered nurse case manager and regional director for Frisco-based Novus Health Services...
NIH ends alcohol study, citing funding, credibility problems

NIH ends alcohol study, citing funding, credibility problems

The U.S. government is shutting down a study that was supposed to show if a single drink a day could prevent heart attacks, saying ethical problems with how the research was planned and funded undermine its credibility. The National Institutes of Health used money from the alcohol industry to help pay for a study that ultimately was expected to cost $100 million. It's legal for NIH to use industry...

Texas heart transplant program resumed after suspension

A Houston hospital announced Friday that it has reactivated its renowned heart transplant program after a two-week suspension of all medical procedures following the deaths this year of several patients. Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center's decision to temporarily halt its program came after a series of joint reports by the Houston Chronicle and ProPublica revealing the departure of several top physicians...

Portugal approves use of marijuana-based medicines

Portugal's parliament has given final legislative approval for the use of marijuana-based medicines, which are already permitted in other European countries. An initial parliamentary debate five months ago considered a provision allowing patients to grow and use marijuana, but that possibility was struck down when the bill passed through a committee stage and was not included in the final vote Friday...

Germany wants EU-wide safety system for truck 'blind spots'

Germany's transport minister wants trucks fitted with compulsory 'blind spot' safety systems to prevent pedestrians and cyclists from being killed by careless drivers. Properly arranged mirrors normally ensure that truck drivers can see all areas in front of and beside their vehicles. But a series of fatal accidents in recent months has strengthened calls from road safety activists for more stringent...
New Delhi orders construction halt as pollution levels soar

New Delhi orders construction halt as pollution levels soar

New Delhi officials have ordered a two-day halt to construction in an attempt to reduce choking pollution that has cloaked the city in smog and dust. The government's Central Pollution Control Board rated the city's air quality Friday as "severe" — the worst possible category — for the fourth day in a row. New Delhi's level of PM2.5, tiny particulate matter that can dangerously...
Doctor pens book on her role in revealing Flint water crisis

Doctor pens book on her role in revealing Flint water crisis

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha had hard evidence that thousands of people in Flint had been exposed to toxic lead in their drinking water. The pediatrician and public health expert figured city and state officials would share her shock and join her in alerting residents. They did not. Hanna-Attisha — who recounts the water crisis in a book that goes on sale Tuesday— had science on her side but...

FDA clears 1st generic film strip of addiction drug Suboxone

U.S. regulators have approved the first generic version of an under-the-tongue film for treating opioid addiction. The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved a generic version of Suboxone, a film strip that dissolves under the tongue. Used daily, it reduces withdrawal symptoms, cravings for opioids and the high from abusing them. The medication combines buprenorphine and naloxone. It's...
Not a hoax: There is a tick that causes red meat allergies 

Not a hoax: There is a tick that causes red meat allergies 

Burger lovers, rib grillers, Taco Tuesday fans−listen up. The Center for Disease Control's May 2018 report that diseases transmitted by fleas, mosquitoes and ticks have tripled in recent years was bad enough, but this is even worse. One type of tick bite causes an allergy to red meat. The actual ailment is galactose-alpha, or alpha-gal. It's transmitted by the Lone Star Tick,...
US renews call for Cuba to probe cause of health 'attacks'

US renews call for Cuba to probe cause of health 'attacks'

The United States on Thursday renewed calls for the Cuban government to determine the source of health "attacks" on U.S. diplomats in Cuba that have affected some two dozen people. Cuba again denied any involvement or knowledge of any such attacks. At a senior-level meeting with Cuban officials in Washington, the State Department said it had again raised the issue, which has prompted a significant...
Fewer US teens smoking, doing drugs ... and drinking milk

Fewer US teens smoking, doing drugs ... and drinking milk

Fewer U.S. teens are smoking, having sex and doing drugs these days. Oh, and they're drinking less milk, too. Less than one-third of high school students drink a glass of milk a day, according to a large government survey released Thursday. About two decades ago, it was nearly half. Last year's survey asked about 100 questions on a wide range of health topics, including smoking, drugs and diet. Researchers...
UK lifts immigration cap for medical workers amid shortages

UK lifts immigration cap for medical workers amid shortages

Britain said Thursday it will lift a cap on the number of visas granted to foreign doctors and nurses to help ease staffing shortfalls in the country's National Health Service. Prime Minister Theresa May's spokesman said the government would remove non-European Union doctors and nurses from a cap on the number of skilled-worker visas that can be issued each year. The cap currently restricts Tier Two...
Why a major paper on the Mediterranean diet was just retracted and replaced

Why a major paper on the Mediterranean diet was just retracted and replaced

Fads in nutrition come and go, but one diet in particular has been widely heralded for its benefits to health — the "Mediterranean diet," rich with vegetables, fruits, fish, nuts and olive oil. For decades, researchers have shown that people in Mediterranean countries seem to show lower rates of heart disease. And in 2013, one landmark study gave the strongest proof yet in one of the...
Ivana Trump promotes Italian weight-loss diet system

Ivana Trump promotes Italian weight-loss diet system

Ivana Trump, the former wife of President Donald Trump who once appeared with him in a commercial for Pizza Hut, wants America to lose some weight. The businesswoman on Wednesday launched a promotional campaign for an Italian weight-loss diet system that offers packaged meals of specially made pastas, soups and drinks. "Health is the most important thing we have, let's keep it that way,"...
Science Says: What happens when researchers make mistakes

Science Says: What happens when researchers make mistakes

Everyone makes mistakes, but when scientists do, the remedy goes far beyond saying you're sorry. Two fresh examples show how some journals and universities react when the need arises to set the record straight. On Wednesday, the New England Journal of Medicine retracted and republished a landmark study on the Mediterranean diet, and issued an unprecedented five other corrections after an obscure report...
Stung by a jellyfish on vacation? Here’s what you should do

Stung by a jellyfish on vacation? Here’s what you should do

Contrary to popular belief, you really shouldn’t pee on a jellyfish sting. Jellyfish stings are on the rise in Florida, according to The Weather Channel. More than 600 people were treated for jellyfish stings over the weekend along Florida’s central Atlantic coast, according to lifeguards on the beaches. Here’s what you need to do if you suspect you’ve been stung by a jellyfish...
How do you count deaths from a hurricane?

How do you count deaths from a hurricane?

How many people died in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria? It's a question that has been debated since the powerful storm slammed into the island and devastated the U.S. territory last year. It's also raised questions about how officials go about the challenging task of counting deaths and deciding what criteria to use. Someone who is killed by a storm-toppled tree, yes. But someone electrocuted by...
Puerto Rico issues new data on Hurricane Maria deaths

Puerto Rico issues new data on Hurricane Maria deaths

Eight days after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, Efrain Perez felt a pain in his chest. Doctors near his small town sent him to Puerto Rico's main hospital for emergency surgery for an aortic aneurysm. But when the ambulance pulled into the parking lot in the capital, San Juan, after a more than two-hour drive, a doctor ran out to stop it. "He said, 'Don't bring him in here, I can't care...
Frustrated AMA adopts sweeping policies to cut gun violence

Frustrated AMA adopts sweeping policies to cut gun violence

With frustration mounting over lawmakers' inaction on gun control, the American Medical Association on Tuesday pressed for a ban on assault weapons and came out against arming teachers as a way to fight what it calls a public health crisis. At its annual policymaking meeting, the nation's largest physicians group bowed to unprecedented demands from doctor-members to take a stronger stand on gun violence...
Massachusetts sues opioid maker, executives over drug crisis

Massachusetts sues opioid maker, executives over drug crisis

Massachusetts sued the maker of prescription opioid painkiller OxyContin and its executives on Tuesday, accusing the company of spinning a "web of illegal deceit" to fuel the deadly drug abuse crisis while boosting profits. Purdue Pharma is already defending lawsuits from several states and local governments, but Massachusetts is the first state to personally name the company's executives...
House aims at campaign-season bills battling opioid abuse

House aims at campaign-season bills battling opioid abuse

The House dove Tuesday into a two-week vote-a-thon on dozens of bills aimed at opioid abuse, as lawmakers try to tackle a crisis that's killing tens of thousands a year and to score a popular win they can tout for the midterm elections. A handful of the measures are contentious, including one Republican bill that would create new criminal penalties for making or trafficking certain synthetic drugs...
Warren County seeking $800K grant that could alter its opioid response

Warren County seeking $800K grant that could alter its opioid response

Warren County hopes to join Montgomery, Preble and Darke counties as beneficiaries of new federal grants designed to help fight the opioid epidemic. Warren County is applying for a $800,000 federal grant to study first responder relationships and processes when children are involved in drug-overdose calls. The commissioners agreed to make the application after a debate about whether the county should...

Salmonella linked to pre-cut melon sickens 60 in Midwest

Health officials say a salmonella outbreak linked to pre-cut melon has sickened 60 people in five Midwestern states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Caito Foods LLC on Friday recalled pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe and fruit medleys containing at least one of those melons that were produced at its facility in Indianapolis. It says the five states where people were...
Justice Department move on health law has risks for GOP

Justice Department move on health law has risks for GOP

The Trump administration's decision to stop defending in court the Obama health law's popular protections for consumers with pre-existing conditions could prove risky for Republicans in the midterm elections — and nudge premiums even higher. The Justice Department said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, beginning with the unpopular...
Celebrity suicides highlight troubling trend in midlife

Celebrity suicides highlight troubling trend in midlife

The deaths of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade highlight a troubling trend — rising suicides among middle-aged Americans. Mental health problems, often undiagnosed, are usually involved and experts say knowing warning signs and who is at risk can help stop a crisis from becoming a tragedy. Bourdain, 61, and Spade, 55, died three days and a continent apart this...
An hour-by-hour, easy guide to improving your energy all day long

An hour-by-hour, easy guide to improving your energy all day long

Is “just −so −tired” your constant state of being? Batteries drained? All out of oomph? Exhausted? There are so many ways to describe that blah, no energy feeling that can strike throughout the day. And while sometimes the explanation is obvious (binge-watching an entire season of Santa Clarita Diet last night may not have been the best idea), other energy sappers...
How to sleep more soundly in the summer swelter

How to sleep more soundly in the summer swelter

The rewards for getting proper shut eye (averaging at least 6 hours per night) range from boosted immunity and reduced stress to lower risk of obesity and the ever-important ability to function at work and while driving. These benefits don't alter in the slightest when summer rolls around. But when Atlanta summer temps start ranging from "sweltering" to "Inferno conditions," the...
Birth control pill recall: Taytulla packaging error could lead to unintended pregnancy

Birth control pill recall: Taytulla packaging error could lead to unintended pregnancy

Drugmaker Allergan has issued a recall for a popular birth control pill over a packaging error that could lead to unintended pregnancy. According to a news release Tuesday, Allergan is recalling one lot of Taytulla birth control pills because capsules were placed in the wrong order. The recalled products are from lot No. 5620706 and have a May 2019 expiration date. "Allergan recently identified...
Stream and dream: How to binge-watch Netflix and still get sleep

Stream and dream: How to binge-watch Netflix and still get sleep

Scientists and your average insomniac have long known that factors from stress to overly hot bedrooms to a partner's snoring can cause poor sleep. Now, there's another item for the list, one that goes in the "life is unfair" column − because it turns out that binge-watching Netflix (your source of joy, stress reduction and water cooler conversations) can cause poor sleep...
Sweet dreams: How to conquer your nightmares 

Sweet dreams: How to conquer your nightmares 

You're asleep, right? You can hardly be expected to control your actions, much less your thoughts. But if bad dreams are ruining your sleep (and affecting your waking moments), you can work to eliminate or minimize them, according to psychologists and sleep experts. "One way of thinking about dreams is that they're part of the same problem-solving processes that we use during the day time,"...
Aimovig: New migraine prevention drug approved by FDA

Aimovig: New migraine prevention drug approved by FDA

If you suffer from chronic migraines, relief is here. According to The Associated Press, the Food and Drug Administration last week approved Aimovig, a monthly shot that aims to reduce migraines. The drug, developed by Amgen Inc. and Novartis AG, is "injected monthly just under the skin using a pen-like device," the AP reported. Its price tag: $6,900 annually before insurance. But how...
New autism research could predict whether children as young as 3 months old are at risk

New autism research could predict whether children as young as 3 months old are at risk

A groundbreaking study is being done at Boston Children's Hospital that researchers say could potentially predict whether a child as young as 3 months old is at-risk for developing autism. Right now, most children can't receive a reliable diagnosis until they are at least 1 year old.  Chase Minicucci and his mother, Hillary Steele Minicucci, regularly go to Boston Children&rsquo...
Major depression diagnoses on the rise in the U.S., study finds

Major depression diagnoses on the rise in the U.S., study finds

Over the past five years, diagnoses of major depression in the United States have risen by at least 33 percent. That’s according to a new report from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, for which analysts assessed the BCBS Health Index built from billions of claims for more than 41 million commercially insured Americans annually. >> Read more trending news  The index...
Drowning doesn't look like what you think. How to recognize the signs

Drowning doesn't look like what you think. How to recognize the signs

No yelling, no waving. Just a silent gasping for air and 20 to 60 seconds later, submersion. And someone has drowned, maybe in plain site. "Drowning is not the violent, splashing call for help that most people expect," noted Coast Guard retiree and trained rescue swimmer Mario Vittone in an article that appeared on the Army blog. "To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic...
WATCH: Pollen cloud springs from tree in sneeze-worthy viral video

WATCH: Pollen cloud springs from tree in sneeze-worthy viral video

Look away, allergy sufferers: This viral video from New Jersey might bring you to tears. On Monday, Facebook user Jennifer Henderson shared a clip of a backhoe tapping a tree in Millville – and the enormous pollen cloud that followed. >> Read more trending news  "When my husband said the pollen's bad, I probably should've taken his word for it. Crazy!" Henderson wrote...
Ohio among states battling sudden rise in Hepatitis A cases

Ohio among states battling sudden rise in Hepatitis A cases

The number of Hepatitis A cases in Ohio and neighboring states has spiked since January, the Ohio Department of Health is reporting. The are currently 31 cases in the state, the highest since 2015, the Greene County Public Health said in a release Tuesday. In comparison, there were four cases during the same period in 2017, two in 2016 and five in 2015, according to the release.  Hepatitis...
‘Being LGBTQ is not an illness’: Record number of states banning conversion therapy

‘Being LGBTQ is not an illness’: Record number of states banning conversion therapy

A record number of jurisdictions this year are taking aim at conversion therapy for minors: an attempt to change someone's sexual orientation or gender identity through tactics as obvious as hypnosis or as subtle as inducing shame.  Almost 50 bills have been introduced in 24 states targeting conversion therapy, which has been discredited by dozens of medical associations and child-welfare institutions...
5 centenarians share strange secrets to longevity

5 centenarians share strange secrets to longevity

What is the secret to longevity? This question taunts all of humanity.  Although we have yet to discover a fountain of youth, centenarians – individuals who live to be over 100-years-old – can potentially give us clues on to how to live longer, healthier and happier lives. By taking a closer look at their lifestyles, genetics and social dynamics, some scientists are trying to...
Death of loved one during pregnancy may affect child's mental health, study says

Death of loved one during pregnancy may affect child's mental health, study says

Grieving the death of a loved one can affect an entire family, including babies. In fact, losing a relative during pregnancy may affect the mental health of a child later in life, according to a new report. Researchers from Stanford University recently conducted a study, published in the American Economic Review, to determine the effect a family member’s death may have on...
Breast cancer patients may help boost survival chances by building muscle, study says

Breast cancer patients may help boost survival chances by building muscle, study says

Chemotherapy and radiation are common treatments for breast cancer. However, building muscle may also help boost chances of survival, according to a new report.  Researchers from Kaiser Permanente recently conducted a study, published in JAMA Oncology, to determine the association between muscle quality and the disease.  To do so, they examined 3,241 women from Kaiser...
Add this common snack to your diet to help avoid heart attacks, study suggests

Add this common snack to your diet to help avoid heart attacks, study suggests

Looking for ways to improve your heart health? Munching on nuts and seeds could lower your cardiovascular disease risk, according to a new report. Researchers from Loma Linda University in California recently conducted a study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, to determine which foods may contribute to heart disease risk, which can lead to high blood pressure, cardiac arrest...
Pasta could help you lose weight, study says

Pasta could help you lose weight, study says

Do you avoid pasta when attempting to drop pounds? Don’t do away with the dish just yet, because it has been linked to weight loss, according to a new report. Researchers from St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada, recently conducted a study, published in the BMJ Open journal, to determine how the Italian staple affects our health. To do so, they took a look at 30 trials that...
Avoid the pain, get the gains: 5 most common exercise-related injuries

Avoid the pain, get the gains: 5 most common exercise-related injuries

For those that take their workouts seriously, be sure to add one more fitness goal to the list: avoiding exercise injuries.  Not only does getting hurt in the gym or on the trail cut back on how much time you spend getting fit,  it's also painful and treatment can be costly. Personal trainer Justin Price, M.A. told Men's Fitness that there are two main reasons for workout-related...
Why mothers shouldn’t rush into another pregnancy

Why mothers shouldn’t rush into another pregnancy

It only takes between eight and 10 weeks after giving birth for a woman to be able to conceive another child, but that doesn’t mean it’s always the best thing for her body. While there’s no set rule as to how soon a woman should get pregnant again, a local doctor encourages women to consider giving their body enough time to physically and emotionally heal from the previous birth...
Americans binge 17 billion drinks a year, CDC estimates

Americans binge 17 billion drinks a year, CDC estimates

College students have a reputation for binge drinking, but it’s not just them. Americans drink massive amounts of alcoholic beverages, according to a new report.  Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a study, published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, to determine how much booze United States citizens down. ...
How barbershops can help trim high blood pressure in black men

How barbershops can help trim high blood pressure in black men

Black men hoping to lower their high blood pressure may want to pay their favorite barber a visit — and bring a pharmacist along. That’s according to new findings from the Smidt Heart Institute published Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine, for which a team of scientists studied 319 African-American men at high risk of heart attack and stroke recruited from...
The exercise that will tighten your abs and help with posture, balance

The exercise that will tighten your abs and help with posture, balance

Stability Ball Knee Tucks strengthen many muscle groups, including the abdominals, low back, legs and arms. Along with the larger muscles responsible for basic movement, many smaller stabilizing muscles are also targeted. Adding stability exercises to your workout has significant benefits, very importantly, helping to improve posture and balance. Execution: Place a small- to medium-size stability...
Allergic reaction to granola bar kills 12-year-old girl, family says

Allergic reaction to granola bar kills 12-year-old girl, family says

A Georgia family is in mourning after an allergic reaction to peanuts led to the death of a 12-year-old girl. Amanda Huynh had been hospitalized before for allergic reactions to peanuts, but it's still surreal for her brother that she's gone. "She meant a lot, to me, and i feel like she means a lot to the community," said her brother, Dillon Huynh. The honor roll student at Lee...
Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

If you are recovering from cardiac arrest, doctors are essential to the healing process, right? According to a new report, you’re more likely to survive if your cardiologist is away. Researchers from Harvard University recently conducted a study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, to determine the possibility of survival for people who suffer heart attacks...
What is the DASH diet? Heart-healthy diet may also reduce risk of depression

What is the DASH diet? Heart-healthy diet may also reduce risk of depression

People who eat fruits, vegetables and whole grains may experience lower rates of depression over time. That’s according to new preliminary research published Sunday in the journal American Academy of Neurology, for which scientists examined 964 participants with an average age of 81 for symptoms of depression. Participants in the study were monitored for symptoms and asked to fill out questionnaires...
Patient blindsided by $17,850 urine test that insurer said was worth $100

Patient blindsided by $17,850 urine test that insurer said was worth $100

After Elizabeth Moreno had back surgery in late 2015, her surgeon prescribed an opioid painkiller and a follow-up drug test that seemed routine — until the lab slapped her with a bill for thousands of dollars. A Houston lab tested her urine sample for a constellation of legal and illicit drugs, many of which, Moreno said, she had never heard of, let alone taken. “I was totally confused...
Drinking this type of tea could ruin your teeth, study says

Drinking this type of tea could ruin your teeth, study says

Do you love sipping tea? Beware of the fruity flavors, because they could be bad for your teeth, according to a new report.  Researchers from King's College London Dental Institute recently conducted a study, published in British Dental Journal, to determine how certain foods and drinks can affect tooth wear.  To do so, researchers examined a previous study that compared...
Hundreds join annual heart walk at Upper Valley Mall

Hundreds join annual heart walk at Upper Valley Mall

More than 300 people, mostly in red, participated in the annual Clark and Champaign Counties Heart Walk today at the Upper Valley Mall. The local walk joins efforts by the American Heart Association to fight heart disease and stroke. The annual event also featured vendor booths and a health fair, and was sponsored by Springfield Regional Medical Center.
Springfielders could be among Ohioans self-diagnosing illnesses online

Springfielders could be among Ohioans self-diagnosing illnesses online

Has a sudden pain in your side or a splotch on your skin that wasn’t there yesterday ever sent you running to WebMD or Google instead of your primary care provider? If so, you may be one of the increasing number of Ohioans turning to the internet to diagnose what ails you. According to a survey of 3,000 adults conducted by Tinker Law Firm, almost 38 percent of Ohioans surveyed admitted they...
Racino to race despite 450 horses quarantined in Warren County

Racino to race despite 450 horses quarantined in Warren County

About 450 horses stabled at the Warren County Fairgrounds are under a quarantine declared by the Ohio Department of Agriculture, but racing is on at the local racino. The quarantine is one of a handful around the state declared because horses have tested positive for Equine Herpes Virus (EHV), most of which have been traced to a horse brought into the state from Pennsylvania, according to officials...
Infertility 'breakthrough': Human eggs fully grown in lab for the first time

Infertility 'breakthrough': Human eggs fully grown in lab for the first time

A group of scientists are touting an infertility "breakthrough" after human eggs have been grown in a lab from their earliest stages to the point of potential fertilization for the first time. Researchers from the United Kingdom and the United States conducted the research, recently publishing their results in the scientific journal Molecular Human Reproduction.  Taking ovarian...
Dayton startup company working to curb hacking of medical devices

Dayton startup company working to curb hacking of medical devices

UPDATE @ 6:25 p.m.: Hannah Hays of Dayton has been in the hospital before, but she never realized the devices used to treat her could have been hacked.  "It's very scary, especially because being in the hospital is a very vulnerable time for someone," said Hays.  Dayton startup MediTechSafe is working to stop the growing danger of medical device hacking.  There were more...
4 bizarre ways people are trying to beat death and aging

4 bizarre ways people are trying to beat death and aging

Death −it's an inevitable reality. Humans have been coming to terms with that fact for centuries. There are various theories on living longer, religious beliefs and theories on the afterlife. However, no matter the belief system we ascribe to, we are still certain that death− whether it be an end or a transition − is coming for all of us. In spite of that, there are thousands...
Don’t lose to weight-loss promotions

Don’t lose to weight-loss promotions

Losing weight ranks as one of the top New Year’s resolutions every year. Many people want fast, easy ways to shed those extra pounds. Ads promoting diet pills, special powders or weight-loss patches are everywhere (television, internet, print, etc.). These products typically guarantee quick results with little or no effort needed. However, many are ineffective and can do more harm than good...
Beware: Mixing herbal products with medication could be dangerous

Beware: Mixing herbal products with medication could be dangerous

If you're currently taking medications for depression, HIV, heart disease, cancer or epilepsy, you should avoid combining herbal remedies with your treatment, a new scientific review suggests. The research, published last month in the "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology", warns of major complications when common herbal supplements are taken in conjunction with cancer treatments...
Is 'souping' the new juicing? 5 things to know about this diet trend

Is 'souping' the new juicing? 5 things to know about this diet trend

Juicing was all the rage for a while, but for dieters looking for a new trend with similar discipline has emerged. "Souping" has the same general idea – substituting for traditional meals for a more liquid-based diet– is one of the latest trends to hit the diet statosphere. People who soup sometimes eat only soup for one or several days, or they may eat it for one meal a day...
5 things you're doing 'for your health' that aren't so healthy

5 things you're doing 'for your health' that aren't so healthy

It seems like there are new health trends popping up all the time. Some super food promising to make you live forever or some natural remedy guaranteed to make you look younger. We may roll our eyes with skepticism, suspecting that the claims are usually too good to be true. But there are actually a lot of normal things we readily do for our health, even though there is no real scientific evidence...
8 odd but effective ways to stop snoring 

8 odd but effective ways to stop snoring 

Lose any sleep from your own or your partner's snoring lately?  For many Americans, it's a lethargic yes. Snoring is a buzz kill, a sleep robber and maybe an indicator of serious health issues, including the obstructive sleep apnea that can lead to heart disease. Some 90 million American adults snore, according to sleepfoundation.org, and many could find relief with general health solutions....
Study: Heart attack care for women pales in comparison to men

Study: Heart attack care for women pales in comparison to men

A new study recently revealed that heart attack care is alarmingly unequal for women when compared to men. Researchers found that many women who have had the most serious type of heart attack − where the coronary artery is completely blocked − don't receive the same tests and treatment that men receive under similar circumstances. »RELATED: Women less likely than men to...
7 ways to cut back on sugar (and cut your cravings)

7 ways to cut back on sugar (and cut your cravings)

If you're drawn to sugary treats like a kid to the candy store, you are not alone. The average American consumes 19.5 teaspoons (82 grams) of sugar every day, which adds up to about 66 pounds of sugar per year, per person, according to the University of California San Francisco SugarScience website.  Meanwhile, the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting added...
9 ways to avoid the sick bug at your office 

9 ways to avoid the sick bug at your office 

The CDC says it's a widespread flu season and the prominent strain is more serious than usual. But even in a milder flu season, if you work outside the home, you're highly likely to pick up a bug at your workplace. Part of that's because nearly 60 percent of employees go to work when they're sick, according to a 2013 study by workplace consulting firm Kimberly-Clark Professional reported...
Is your marriage over? 7 signs it may be time to call it quits (and 5 signs to stay)

Is your marriage over? 7 signs it may be time to call it quits (and 5 signs to stay)

If all you read is the Ladies Home Journal column "Can This Marriage Be Saved?", you'd think the answer is always a roaring  yes. But that standby, a popular read since its launch in 1953, is selected by counselors of couples in situations they can salvage, especially with the help of therapists. Outside of LHJ's pages, many marriages do not last and should not last. Is yours one...
Obesity surgery safer than traditional treatments, study suggests

Obesity surgery safer than traditional treatments, study suggests

Having surgery to treat obesity may seem like a drastic option, but a new study suggests it may actually be a safer route than more traditional options. Researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Clalit Research Institute in Israel, recently published their findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association. »RELATED: New anti-obesity drug could...

Get fit: 3 mistakes to avoid while exercising

One of the greatest benefits of exercise is that it enables you to be more in tune with your body. During a workout you learn how your body reacts to different types of activity. Uncomfortable responses associated with exercise such as muscle soreness are normal, while other situations can be an indication of a more serious problem. Over-training and poor exercise form are two of the most common scenarios...
Flu virus spread by breathing, study finds

Flu virus spread by breathing, study finds

Most people believe that the influenza virus is spread through the coughs and sneezes of infected people, but new research published Thursday suggests that the flu virus is spread more easily than previously thought. Medical professionals believe that the virus is spread most often by “droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk,” according to the Centers for Disease Control...
5 questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor

5 questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor

Women who are in their 40s are in many cases reaching a new stage in their lives. Your children may be more independent, and you might have a well-established career. It can also be a time of change, when it's easier to gain weight, and you may start to see the first signs of menopause. Being informed about the changes you may face during your 40s is an important way to protect your health for many...
Good Samaritan closing: Employees still in shock 

Good Samaritan closing: Employees still in shock 

A day after the announcement that Good Samaritan Hospital will shut its doors for good at the end of the year, employees said their still trying to come to grips with the initial shock.  Some didn't know anything about it prior to the announcement, while others say they'd heard behind-the scenes rumblings. But all of them said Thursday that there's no way to prepare for the way in which they...
Premier planning to redevelop Good Sam site once hospital closes

Premier planning to redevelop Good Sam site once hospital closes

Premier Health officials have told this news organization that they want to "transform" the soon-to-be former main campus of Good Samaritan Hospital once the facility closes at the end of the year. They don't know exactly what redevelopment will look like on the site once the buildings are razed, but they say it's a process they will be here to see through. "Unlike other Dayton-based...
5 questions every man in his 40s should ask his doctor

5 questions every man in his 40s should ask his doctor

Men are notorious for not wanting to go to the doctor unless they're desperate. But routine doctor's visits – especially when you hit your 40s and beyond – can help you be as healthy as possible. Getting regular care and screenings can help your doctor catch and treat issues while they're in their earliest stages. »RELATED: 4 health questions every man in his 30s should ask his doctor...
High-salt diet could cause dementia, study finds

High-salt diet could cause dementia, study finds

Consuming too much salt can be dangerous for your health. It can cause your blood pressure and cholesterol to skyrocket, but it might also cause memory loss, according to a new report.  Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine in New York recently conducted an experiment, published in the Nature Neuroscience journal, to determine if salt was linked with memory loss. To do so, the researchers...
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