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Newborn syphilis cases in US reach highest level in 20 years

The number of U.S. babies born infected with syphilis has reached the highest level in 20 years. It is still rare for babies to get syphilis from their infected mothers, but figures released Tuesday show more than 900 cases were reported last year. That's more than double the number in 2013. Most cases were in the Southeast and Southwest. The last time the number was that high or higher was in the...
Russian Pussy Riot activist conscious after poisoning

Russian Pussy Riot activist conscious after poisoning

A member of the Russian protest group Pussy Riot said Tuesday he's recovering after two weeks in intensive care for a suspected poisoning while a fellow activist suggested he could have been targeted for looking into the killings of Russian journalists in Africa. Pyotr Verzilov has been at Berlin's Charite hospital since arriving from Moscow, where he had been previously treated. Verzilov tweeted...
Antibiotics for appendicitis? Surgery often not needed

Antibiotics for appendicitis? Surgery often not needed

When emergency tests showed the telltale right-sided pain in Heather VanDusen's abdomen was appendicitis, she figured she'd be quickly wheeled into surgery. But doctors offered her the option of antibiotics instead. A new study from Finland shows her choice is a reasonable alternative for most patients with appendicitis. Five years after treatment with antibiotics, almost two-thirds of patients hadn't...
What's yogurt? Industry wants greater liberty to use term

What's yogurt? Industry wants greater liberty to use term

If low-fat yogurt is blended with fatty ingredients like coconut or chocolate, is it still low-fat? Is it even yogurt? The U.S. government has rules about what can be called "yogurt," and the dairy industry says it's not clear what the answers are. Now it's hopeful it will finally get to use the term with greater liberty, with the Trump administration in the process of updating the yogurt...
Thai police hand over 100 kilos of marijuana for research

Thai police hand over 100 kilos of marijuana for research

Thai police on Tuesday handed over around 100 kilograms (220 pounds) of seized marijuana for medical research, as officials seek to produce pot-based medication. Sophon Mekthon, chairman of the Government Pharmaceutical Organization, said researchers chose high-quality marijuana from police to conduct medical research, selecting from batches of seized imported marijuana and taking some local strains...

WHO warns of 'perfect storm' for Ebola in eastern Congo

Insecurity, public defiance about vaccinations and political jockeying could create a "perfect storm" leading Congo's latest Ebola outbreak to spread, the emergencies chief for the World Health Organization said Tuesday. Dr. Peter Salama said the response to the deadly hemorrhagic fever is at a "critical juncture" in eastern North Kivu province, where the outbreak was declared...
Doctors use 3D printer to save baby's life

Doctors use 3D printer to save baby's life

At Children's Hospital of Atlanta, a baby boy is breathing a lot easier, thanks to a life-saving procedure involving a 3D printing machine. Eight-month-old Amir is sleeping peacefully and breathing easy now, something he couldn't do when he was born. "He was just a baby that, he would always cry," said his mom, Linda Long. "So we knew something was wrong with him, but we didn't...
California urges Trump to drop plan for weaker fuel standard

California urges Trump to drop plan for weaker fuel standard

California officials demanded Monday that the Trump administration back off a plan to weaken national fuel economy standards aimed at reducing car emissions and saving people money at the pump, saying the proposed rollback would damage people's health and exacerbate climate change. Looming over the administration's proposal is the possibility that the state, which has become a key leader on climate...
Frozen embryos mistakenly destroyed at Seattle hospital 

Frozen embryos mistakenly destroyed at Seattle hospital 

Dozens of women hoping to have children are dealing with heartbreaking loss after their frozen embryos were mistakenly destroyed at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. >> Read more trending news  Tina Mankowski, director of strategic communications for UW Medicine, confirmed that 31 patients were affected and that the destruction happened in...
Implant, intense rehab help 3 paralyzed for years take steps

Implant, intense rehab help 3 paralyzed for years take steps

Three people whose legs were paralyzed for years can stand and take steps again thanks to an electrical implant that zaps the injured spinal cord — along with months of intense rehab, researchers reported Monday. The milestone, reported by two teams of scientists working separately, isn't a cure. The patients walk only with assistance — holding onto a rolling walker or with other help...

UK opens long-awaited inquiry into tainted blood scandal

A long-awaited inquiry has opened in Britain into how contaminated blood was used to treat thousands of people in the 1970s and '80s, killing at least 2,400. Thousands of British public health patients — many of them hemophiliacs — were infected with HIV or Hepatitis C through tainted blood, much of it coming from donors including prison inmates. Authorities studied the infections, but...
Which personality type are you? New study reveals 4 core groupings

Which personality type are you? New study reveals 4 core groupings

You may be familiar with Myers-Briggs’ 16 different personality types, but new research published this week in the journal Nature Human Behavior shows there are four distinct personality clusters most individuals around the globe adhere to best. Psychologists and engineers at Northwestern University in Illinois sought to “develop an alternative approach to the identification...
Swiss reject bids to improve food quality, protect farmers

Swiss reject bids to improve food quality, protect farmers

Swiss voters on Sunday roundly rejected two proposals aimed at protecting Swiss farmers and ensuring that food from both domestic and foreign producers is healthier, more environmentally sound and animal-friendly. About 61.3 percent of voters rejected the "Fair-Food Initiative," which would have required the government to promote environmentally sound, animal-friendly and fairly produced...
UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

Drinking too much alcohol killed more than 3 million people in 2016, mostly men, the World Health Organization said. The U.N. health agency also warned that current policy responses are not sufficient to reverse trends predicting an increase in consumption over the next 10 years. In a new report Friday, the agency said that about 237 million men and 46 million women faced alcohol problems, with the...
Italy extends time for vaccine proof for young school kids

Italy extends time for vaccine proof for young school kids

Italian parents have more time before having to produce proof to schools that their children have received 10 mandatory vaccinations. The Italian Senate has extended until March a requirement that families provide vaccination documentation so their children can attend nursery school or kindergarten. The certification requirement was supposed to have kicked in before the school year started in September...
Springfield’s Rocking Horse gets $50,000 to help kids impacted by drugs

Springfield’s Rocking Horse gets $50,000 to help kids impacted by drugs

A Springfield medical health center will receive new money to help local kids who have lost a parent to drugs. CVS Health distributed a $50,000 grant to Rocking Horse Community Health Center Friday morning that will be used to help Clark County children who have been impacted the most by the opioid epidemic. The money will also go to help children whose parents are addicted to drugs. “We are...

Congo reports Ebola death close to busy Ugandan border

A Congolese woman who refused an Ebola vaccination and then disappeared has died of the virus near the heavily traveled border with Uganda, which is preparing to begin vaccinations as needed. The confirmed Ebola death announced by local authorities highlights the challenges health workers are facing in a region of northeastern Congo that had never experienced an outbreak of the hemorrhagic fever before...
Hurricane Safety: 6 scary, infectious illnesses you can catch from floodwater

Hurricane Safety: 6 scary, infectious illnesses you can catch from floodwater

Hurricanes can leave behind tons of damage, including flooding. But did you know that treading through the wrong kind of water can cause illnesses or even death? Floodwaters and standing water are often contaminated, posing several risks, such as infectious diseases, chemical hazards and injuries. Here are six sicknesses you should beware of in the aftermath: Drinking or eating...

UN: Excessive drinking killed over 3 million people in 2016

Drinking too much alcohol killed more than 3 million people in 2016, mostly men, the World Health Organization said. The U.N. health agency also warned that current policy responses are not sufficient to reverse trends predicting an increase in consumption over the next 10 years. In a new report Friday, the WHO said that about 237 million men and 46 million women faced alcohol problems, with the highest...
Groups say Medicare discounts threatened in opioids bill

Groups say Medicare discounts threatened in opioids bill

Consumer and health care groups are scrambling to block what they say is a move by the pharmaceutical industry to commandeer must-pass opioids epidemic legislation as a vehicle for rolling back drugmaker discounts to Medicare beneficiaries with high prescription costs. Republicans said Friday nothing has been decided in behind-the-scenes discussions. But Henry Connelly, a spokesman for House Democratic...
Food researcher defends work after resigning from Cornell

Food researcher defends work after resigning from Cornell

A prominent food researcher is defending his work a day after Cornell University said he engaged in academic misconduct and was removed from all teaching and research positions. Brian Wansink says he never committed fraud and that the issues identified by the university's investigation were relatively minor. Among the issues Cornell cited Thursday were "misreporting of research data" and...
Tutu urges regulated euthanasia after campaigner's arrest

Tutu urges regulated euthanasia after campaigner's arrest

Terminally ill people should have the right to a "dignified assisted death," former South African archbishop Desmond Tutu said Friday, following a murder charge against a local campaigner for the legalization of euthanasia. Lawmakers "should engage, enable and appropriately regulate" the choice of how and when to die for people who are close to death, the 86-year-old Nobel laureate...
California makes people ask for straws, sodas with kid meals

California makes people ask for straws, sodas with kid meals

If you want a straw with your drink or a soda with a kids' meal at a California restaurant, you'll need to ask for them starting next year. A law signed Thursday by Gov. Jerry Brown makes California the first state to bar full-service restaurants from automatically giving out single-use plastic straws. Another law he approved requires milk or water to be the default drink sold with kids' meals at...
Arizona to open first US medicinal marijuana kitchen in Tempe

Arizona to open first US medicinal marijuana kitchen in Tempe

The first full-service cannabis kitchen will open in Arizona on Oct. 5, KSAZ reported. >> Read more trending news  The Mint Dispensary is launching the kitchen in Tempe, and Arizona residents with a medicinal marijuana card will be able to buy a meal customized with a dose of cannabis, KNXV reported. The breakfasts, lunches and dinners will be prepared by chef Carylann Principal...
Floodwaters inundate lake at NC power plant, raising alarm

Floodwaters inundate lake at NC power plant, raising alarm

Duke Energy activated a high-level emergency alert at a retired coal-fired power plant in North Carolina as floodwaters from the nearby Cape Fear River overtopped an earthen dike there and inundated a large lake, raising concerns of a potential breach. The dam containing Sutton Lake appeared stable and Duke officials were monitoring it with helicopters and drones, Duke spokeswoman Paige Sheehan said...
Cornell review finds academic misconduct by food researcher

Cornell review finds academic misconduct by food researcher

A prominent Cornell University food researcher resigned after an investigation found he committed academic misconduct, including misreporting data, the school announced Thursday. Brian Wansink has been removed from all teaching and research positions and will retire at the end of the school year next June, Cornell said in a statement. Wansink had previously helped update the U.S. dietary guidelines...
Colorado meatpacker recalls ground beef after E. coli death

Colorado meatpacker recalls ground beef after E. coli death

A Colorado meatpacker is recalling more than 132,000 pounds (60,000 kilograms) of ground beef after a suspected E. coli outbreak killed one person and sickened 17, officials said. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said Wednesday the beef was produced and packaged at Cargill Meat Solutions in Fort Morgan on June 21 and shipped to retailers nationwide. The products include 3-, 10- and 20-pound (1.3-...

Food research articles retracted by leading medical journal

A leading medical journal has retracted six food research articles by a Cornell University marketing professor, saying the results can't be verified. The papers under question include a 2005 study that said people eat more when served food in large bowls and a 2013 article that said hungry grocery shoppers buy foods with more calories but not more food. They appeared in journals published by the JAMA...
Judge throws out lawsuit by ex-wrestlers over concussions

Judge throws out lawsuit by ex-wrestlers over concussions

A federal judge in Connecticut has dismissed a lawsuit by 60 former professional wrestlers, many of them stars in the 1980s and 1990s, who claimed World Wrestling Entertainment failed to protect them from repeated head trauma including concussions that led to long-term brain damage. U.S. District Judge Vanessa Bryant in Hartford threw out the lawsuit Monday, saying many of the claims were frivolous...
‘Skeeter syndrome’ can cause allergic reaction in children

‘Skeeter syndrome’ can cause allergic reaction in children

Mosquitoes not only are annoying, but they also can make you sick.  >> Read more trending news  “Skeeter syndrome” is not just a clever name. It’s a description for an allergic reaction to proteins in mosquito saliva that can cause problems, particularly for children, Health Magazine reported. That red and itchy swelling that can be painful is sometimes...
Monsanto asks judge to throw out $289M award in cancer suit

Monsanto asks judge to throw out $289M award in cancer suit

Agribusiness company Monsanto has asked a San Francisco judge to throw out a jury's $289 million award to a former school groundskeeper who said the company's Roundup weed killer left him dying of cancer. DeWayne Johnson failed to prove that Roundup or similar herbicides caused his non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and presented no evidence that Monsanto executives were malicious in marketing Roundup, attorneys...

Biopharmaceutical company fined for misleading investors

A Colorado-based biopharmaceutical company has been penalized more than $20 million for misleading investors about the efficacy of a lung cancer drug under development before raising $300 million in a public stock offering. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission brought the complaint against Clovis Oncology Inc., of Boulder, and two company executives — CEO Patrick Mahaffy and former chief...

Administration sends states $1B in grants to battle opioids

The Trump administration is awarding more than $1 billion in grants to help states confront the opioid epidemic, with most of the money going to expand access to treatment and recovery services. Officials say more than $900 million comes from a grant program Congress approved this spring as part of a budget bill. Lawmakers are working on another bipartisan bill to address the opioid problem and hope...
Official: More possible victims of California doctor found

Official: More possible victims of California doctor found

Investigators have identified three more possible victims after a California surgeon and his girlfriend were charged with drugging and raping two intoxicated women, prosecutors said Wednesday. Michelle Van Der Linden, a spokeswoman for the Orange County district attorney's office, said prosecutors have received numerous calls since Tuesday, when the initial charges were announced against Dr. Grant...

Rumors, conflict challenge Ebola response in eastern Congo

The latest Ebola outbreak in Congo presents complex challenges as the virus spreads for the first time in an area where long-running conflict is hampering aid efforts, the regional Africa chief for the International Federation of the Red Cross said Wednesday. Red Cross teams have resorted to training civil protection volunteers who enter "no-go areas" to carry out safe and dignified burials...
California: Drugmaker paid doctors to overprescribe Humira

California: Drugmaker paid doctors to overprescribe Humira

Pharmaceutical giant AbbVie illegally plied doctors with cash, gifts and services to prescribe one of the world's best-selling drugs, Humira, despite its potentially deadly complications, a California official said in a lawsuit filed Tuesday. The lawsuit by the state's insurance commissioner accuses the company of a far-reaching kickback scheme that led doctors to write more prescriptions for the...

Burkina Faso arrests 30 over illegal female circumcisions

Burkina Faso authorities have jailed more than 30 adults after they carried out botched female genital mutilation on nearly 60 infants and girls who have been hospitalized. Viviane Ursule Sanou, head of the National Secretariat against Circumcision, said Tuesday the banned procedure was carried out on girls and young women ranging from 10 months to 24 years old in the capital, Ouagadougou, Kaya in...
South African court says marijuana use in private is legal

South African court says marijuana use in private is legal

South Africa's top court says adults can use marijuana in private. The Constitutional Court on Tuesday upheld a provincial court's ruling in a case involving Gareth Prince, who advocates the decriminalization of the drug. Prince says cannabis should be regulated in the same way as alcohol and tobacco. Government authorities have said cannabis is harmful and should be illegal. The top court says an...
Are household disinfectants making kids overweight? Study finds possible link

Are household disinfectants making kids overweight? Study finds possible link

Obesity affects nearly 1 in 6 children in the United States, according to new data from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s State of Obesity report. And new findings from the Canadian Medical Association Journal reveal there may be more contributing to that stat than overeating. Overweight children are approximately five times more likely to be obese or overweight as adults, increasing...

GOP, Dems unite behind Senate bill fighting addictive drugs

Republicans and Democrats joined forces to speed legislation combating the misuse of opioids and other addictive drugs through Senate passage Monday, a rare campaign-season show of unity against a growing and deadly health care crisis. The measure passed by a 99-1 vote Monday evening. Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, voted against it. It takes wide aim at the problem, including increasing scrutiny of arriving...
Coca-Cannabis? Coke analyzing cannabis in wellness drinks

Coca-Cannabis? Coke analyzing cannabis in wellness drinks

The Coca-Cola Company said Monday it is "closely watching" the expanding use of a cannabis element in drinks, another sign cannabis and cannabis-infused products are getting more acceptance in mainstream culture and a harder look from long-established pillars of American business. The statement came after reports the beverage giant was in talks with a Canadian cannabis company to create...

Watchdog: EPA asbestos protection for schoolchildren lagging

The Environmental Protection Agency is shifting money away from a congressionally mandated program meant to get harmful asbestos out of schools, even though the threat of contamination remains, the agency's internal watchdog said on Monday. Asbestos, which builders used for decades as insulation and as a fire-resistant material, can cause lung diseases, cancer and other health problems. Under a 1986...
Mormon leaders call for new medical-marijuana plan in months

Mormon leaders call for new medical-marijuana plan in months

Mormon church leaders are calling for Utah lawmakers to pass medical-marijuana legislation by the end of the year even as they urge people to vote against a ballot measure that would legalize medical marijuana in the state. Church leaders say they oppose the ballot measure because they believe it could allow recreational users get marijuana in Utah if it passes in November, but they still want patients...
2 million US teens are vaping marijuana

2 million US teens are vaping marijuana

A school-based survey shows nearly 1 in 11 U.S. students have used marijuana in electronic cigarettes, heightening health concerns about the new popularity of vaping among teens. E-cigarettes typically contain nicotine, but many of the battery-powered devices can vaporize other substances, including marijuana. Results published Monday mean 2.1 million middle and high school students have used them...
Watchdog slams safeguards for foster kids on psych drugs

Watchdog slams safeguards for foster kids on psych drugs

Thousands of foster children may be getting powerful psychiatric drugs prescribed to them without basic safeguards, says a federal watchdog agency that found a failure to care for youngsters whose lives have already been disrupted. A report released Monday by the Health and Human Services inspector general's office found that about 1 in 3 foster kids from a sample of states were prescribed psychiatric...

Doctors group recommends support for transgender children

A doctors group took a stand in support of transgender children Monday, offering advice in what it called "a rapidly evolving" field. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommended support for kids who change their names or hairstyles to affirm their chosen gender identity. The group said children are more likely to have better physical and mental health with such support. The policy describes...

FEMA chief: Too much blame around on Puerto Rico deaths

The Trump administration's disaster relief chief said Sunday that "the numbers are all over the place" from studies on the death toll in Puerto Rico from last year's Hurricane Maria, keeping the issue in focus after President Donald Trump questioned the widely accepted count. "There's just too much blame going around," said the Federal Emergency Management Agency's Brock Long,...
Former Colorado nuke site opens to public as wildlife refuge

Former Colorado nuke site opens to public as wildlife refuge

Cyclists and hikers explored a newly opened wildlife refuge at the site of a former nuclear weapons plant in Colorado on Saturday, while a protester in a gas mask brought signs warning about the dangers of plutonium. With no fanfare, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service opened the gates of Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge on the perimeter of a government factory that made plutonium triggers for...
Do you think Ohio should put air conditioners in schools? One local lawmaker thinks so

Do you think Ohio should put air conditioners in schools? One local lawmaker thinks so

State Rep. Niraj Antani, R-Miamisburg, has requested an estimate to install air conditioners into every Ohio school, according to a release.  In reaction to Tuesday’s early dismissals across the Miami Valley due to extreme heat, Antani sent a letter to State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria expressing his concern for the lack of air conditioning in schools. “Today, a number of school...
Deadly salmonella outbreak linked to kosher chicken

Deadly salmonella outbreak linked to kosher chicken

Salmonella has sickened 17 people in four states and one person has died, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Eight people reportedly were so sick that they had to be hospitalized.  The illnesses have been linked to kosher chicken, officials said. Several people reported getting sick after eating Empire-brand kosher chicken. Empire is the largest producer...
Why whooping cough is making a comeback

Why whooping cough is making a comeback

After a week with a dry cough, Karen Andes’ son started experiencing middle-of-the-night coughing fits so severe, he couldn’t talk. He returned home from his first trip to the urgent care clinic in mid-July with an inhaler and a five-day course of steroids. The coughing fits didn’t abate, and after a few days, the Decatur, Georgia, teenager jumped out of bed and got his...
Here’s what data say about who is dying from overdoses in Clark County

Here’s what data say about who is dying from overdoses in Clark County

Clark County set a new record while ranking third in the state for drug deaths in 2017 by the Ohio Department of Health, according to preliminary data from the state agency when adjusted for age. The health department found 96 Clark County residents died of an unintentional drug-related overdose in 2017. When adjusted for age, the department gave Clark County a score of 81. Only Montgomery County...
5 things every parent should know about immunization

5 things every parent should know about immunization

Within the first few months of your child's life, your pediatrician will likely start talking to you about immunizations. Even if your house is stocked with hand sanitizer and antibacterial soap, it's important to know what options are out there to keep your kid safe from diseases that could have harmful consequences. With all of the talk out there about the pros and cons of getting...
What age should you stop breastfeeding your baby?

What age should you stop breastfeeding your baby?

It's motherhood 101: Breast is best for your new bundle of joy. However, there are few hard and fast rules on when to wean your little one from breastfeeding. August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month, so it’s the opportune time to take a look at some of the benefits for nursing mothers and their babies.  Breastfeeding comes with advantages for both moms and infants, according to...
5 things every parent should know about immunization

5 things every parent should know about immunization

Within the first few months of your child's life, your pediatrician will likely start talking to you about immunizations. Even if your house is stocked with hand sanitizer and antibacterial soap, it's important to know what options are out there to keep your kid safe from diseases that could have harmful consequences. TheWorld Health Organization defines immunization as the process that makes a person...
Could your child be gifted? Here's what you need to know 

Could your child be gifted? Here's what you need to know 

Just about every parent has heard their child say something that seems advanced for his age. Or seen her show off an impressive new skill and wondered, "Is my child is gifted?" Of course, each child has special talents and interests, but giftedness is usually identified in specific ways. What does it mean to be gifted and what traits could indicate that your child falls into this category?...
Clark County drug deaths are down in 2018, but drug use likely similar

Clark County drug deaths are down in 2018, but drug use likely similar

MORE: Addicts, families share stories at Springfield recovery banquet Fewer drug-related deaths have been recorded in Clark County this year, but health officials and law enforcement warn that doesn’t mean fewer people are using drugs. Narcan and other life-saving measures have played a significant role in reducing deaths, said Wendy Doolittle, Chief Executive Director of McKinley Hall, a drug...
Back-to-school selfies may spread super lice, expert says

Back-to-school selfies may spread super lice, expert says

Parents may want to add super lice remedies to the back-to-school shopping list. A 2013 study in the Journal of Medical Entomology found that in North America, most head lice has evolved into a new, more powerful strain that is immune to traditional lice treatments, hence the name “super lice.” Canada had been experiencing an alarming rise in cases, and there have been multiple outbreaks...
When should my child take those much-anticipated first steps?

When should my child take those much-anticipated first steps?

Your child's first steps are a time of great anticipation and excitement, but you might also wonder if he or she is taking too long to reach this important milestone. Most babies start to take their first steps when they're between 9-12 months old, and most are walking well at around the 14- to 15-month mark, according to BabyCenter. The important part to remember is "most," since like...
Look who's talking: When should your baby start talking? 

Look who's talking: When should your baby start talking? 

Parents look forward to their kids saying their first words, eagerly listening for that first "Mama" or "Dada" or even something random. If you have friends telling you that their child had already started to chatter at a certain age, you may start to wonder if your child will ever talk. Those first sounds represent your child's attempts to interact with her environment, and it...
7 tips to help soothe your teething child

7 tips to help soothe your teething child

Those first few baby teeth look awfully cute, but as they're working their way through your child's gums, they can cause a good bit of discomfort. Naturally, you'll want to make your baby as comfortable as possible. Give your baby something cold – like a pacifier, teething ring, spoon or clean wet washcloth that's been placed in the fridge – to help relieve the pain, WebMD experts suggest...
Man's limbs amputated after dog's lick likely caused bacterial infection

Man's limbs amputated after dog's lick likely caused bacterial infection

A Wisconsin man's limbs were amputated after doctors said he contracted a bacterial infection – likely from a dog's lick. According to WITI, Greg Manteufel, 48, of West Bend, believed he had the flu when he went to the emergency room in late June. But doctors later determined that capnocytophaga, a type of bacteria found in dog saliva, had caused the infection that left him bruised, dropped...
Alzheimer's trial drug shows promise, lifts hopes of local families

Alzheimer's trial drug shows promise, lifts hopes of local families

More than 5.7 million Americans are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease, including 30,000 in the Miami Valley. A new clinical trial has many feeling hopeful, especially with the number diagnosed expected to jump to 15 million over the next two decades. Eighteen months after patients took a drug called Ban 2401, many said they saw a dramatic improvement. John Loveless and his wife, Jennifer, life...
9 healthy, delicious school lunch ideas your kids will love

9 healthy, delicious school lunch ideas your kids will love

You want to pack a healthy, appealing lunch for your kids every day. Problem is, it’s easy to fall into a lunch rut. Who hasn’t eaten the same turkey sandwich every day for a week? Experts say planning ahead and getting your kids involved in the process can go a long way in preparing a healthy, balanced — and enticing— school lunch. Here are six tips and nine recipes (see box)...
Hot Cheetos, Takis under fire after mom blames spicy snacks for daughter's gallbladder surgery

Hot Cheetos, Takis under fire after mom blames spicy snacks for daughter's gallbladder surgery

A health warning tonight for parents: Doctors say popular spicy snacks are making many kids sick. A doctor at LeBohneur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, told WHBQ that more kids have been checking in with stomach pain. They believe the spicy snacks are the main contributor, and they are encouraging parents to know what their kids are eating. “There's a YouTube...
8 warning signs that your child could have a speech delay

8 warning signs that your child could have a speech delay

Your child's first few words represent an exciting milestone, so if there’s the slightest delay in those first words or their evolution into sentences, it may alarm any doting parent. Parents often wonder if their child has a speech delay, especially if other children seem to be speaking at an earlier age. Most children eventually catch up, but if you can detect any potential issues early, you...
What’s that red spot? Things to know about rashes and your child

What’s that red spot? Things to know about rashes and your child

Childhood rashes are extremely common and in most cases, they're not serious. It can be worrying though to see hives, welts or other types of rash on your child's skin and you may be confused about what's causing the issue. The following guide will help you understand the causes of rashes and to know when you should be concerned enough to call the pediatrician: Rashes can be caused by a lot of different...
Frequent teen technology use linked to ADHD symptoms, study finds

Frequent teen technology use linked to ADHD symptoms, study finds

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is one of the most common neurodevelopmental disorders of childhood, affecting millions of American children annually, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While the causes and risk factors of the disorder are unknown, researchers are studying how brain injury, exposure to lead and other environmental factors during...
Does your child have a food allergy? Here's how to tell

Does your child have a food allergy? Here's how to tell

Food allergies are a growing problem, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and in the cases of children, an allergic reaction to something as simple as sandwich could potentially be life-threatening. About 4-6 percent of children in the U.S. have food allergies, and it's important to know whether your child is among this group. The most common food allergies in children...
Man dies after eating raw oysters at Florida restaurant, report says

Man dies after eating raw oysters at Florida restaurant, report says

A man died from a Vibrio vulnificus bacterial infection after eating raw oysters at a Florida restaurant, health officials say. The 71-year-old man reportedly died two days after eating the raw oysters in a Sarasota restaurant. Health officials have not said which restaurant. "We have an individual that consumed some raw oysters and to the best of our knowledge had no exposure to salt water...
5 signs your relationship is hurting your mental health

5 signs your relationship is hurting your mental health

Everyone in a relationship knows how easy it is to accuse a partner of something they didn't do. It's their fault, you tell them, whether the spat is about towels on the bathroom floor, an angry mother-in-law or a missed restaurant reservation. Sometimes you know you're wrong the second these words leave your mouth; other times you recognize your mistake in the days to come. But the same people often...
What is autism? Things to know about the disorder

What is autism? Things to know about the disorder

Autism is a disorder that has been around since the 1940s, but still has an air of mystery around it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 1 in 59 children in the United States has autism. But with a list of different symptoms and causes, it can be hard to know what you should look for and how to tell if your child might be showing early signs. To help you, here's an overview...
Grandma was right: Why it's good for your health to be outdoors

Grandma was right: Why it's good for your health to be outdoors

Sure, there are treadmills at climate-controlled gyms and Nintendo's Wii is still going strong with indoor workouts like Zumba Fitness 2. And yet, old-fashioned advice to "go outside and play" is still the best for your health, according to researchers the world over. In one study published by the NCBI, researchers found a decrease in both heart rate and cortisol...
Back-to-school selfies may spread super lice, expert says

Back-to-school selfies may spread super lice, expert says

Parents may want to add super lice remedies to the back-to-school shopping list. A 2013 study in the Journal of Medical Entomology found that in North America, most head lice has evolved into a new, more powerful strain that is immune to traditional lice treatments, hence the name “super lice.” » RELATED: Back-to-school sales starting early as first day approaches...
Baby sleep: 7 tips for surviving the first few months

Baby sleep: 7 tips for surviving the first few months

The first few months of motherhood can make you feel like you're the unwitting victim of a sleep-deprivation experiment. The common advice is to sleep when the baby's sleeping, but that only works if your idea of getting rest is sleeping for two hours at a time and giving up all your other responsibilities. When you're getting up at nighttime to feed your baby, Today's Parent recommends that...
9 infant illnesses to watch for (and when to worry)

9 infant illnesses to watch for (and when to worry)

The first couple of years of children's lives are full of discoveries for their parents. You'll learn about their personalities, their favorite foods and what makes their faces light up. However, that time can also be a little unsettling due to some common ailments that infants often encounter within the first few years of their lives. Hand, Foot and Mouth DiseaseHand, foot and mouth disease starts...
6 things your child should know before starting kindergarten

6 things your child should know before starting kindergarten

Your child will learn a wealth of information in kindergarten, and you can help ensure that he or she knows what's needed to get off to a good start.  If you're like most parents, you probably wonder how much and exactly what your child needs to know in order to feel at ease and be ready to learn. Your child should know some basics that will help kindergarten start more comfortably and easily...
Coffee drinker? You’re more likely to live longer, study finds

Coffee drinker? You’re more likely to live longer, study finds

The list of health benefits of drinking coffee continues to grow longer. A new study published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine revealed that coffee drinkers have a lower risk of death compared to non-coffee drinkers. To understand whether heavy coffee consumption is linked to an increased risk of mortality, researchers from Maryland and Illinois assessed demographic, lifestyle...
7 ways to put bed-wetting to rest for your child

7 ways to put bed-wetting to rest for your child

Bed-wetting is no fun for your child, who's waking up with soaked sheets, or for you, the parent. This problem is common, with about 5 million children in the U.S. wetting the bed, according to HealthyChildren.org. About 20 percent of five-year-olds, 10 percent of seven-year-olds and 5 percent of 10-year-olds wet the bed. If your child is wetting the bed, he or she will probably outgrow it, but...
What is juuling? 5 things to know about concerning teen trend

What is juuling? 5 things to know about concerning teen trend

A popular product in the e-cigarette market is getting kids addicted to nicotine fast, some health experts say. The Juul, a small vape device that resembles a flash drive, can be charged in a laptop USB port. Juul uses an “intelligent heating mechanism that creates an aerosol and is engineered to minimize combustion,” according to the company’s website. Only adults ages 21 or older...
Is your child's teeth grinding normal?

Is your child's teeth grinding normal?

Teeth grinding – which is also known as bruxism – is very common in children, especially among toddlers and preschoolers. If you hear your child doing this at night, or if they have symptoms of teeth grinding, here's what you need to know about whether this habit is anything to be concerned about: About 20-30 percent of kids grind their teeth or clench their jaws. They usually outgrow...
Childhood asthma: What you need to know

Childhood asthma: What you need to know

For parents of children who have asthma, it's scary to see your child have trouble breathing. You'll want to learn what you can about this chronic condition so you can recognize the symptoms and help your child manage his or her asthma. About 6 million children in the U.S. have asthma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It's a chronic condition that causes the...
Cincinnati Children’s jumps to No. 2 spot in nation, is first in Ohio

Cincinnati Children’s jumps to No. 2 spot in nation, is first in Ohio

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center ranks second in the nation and first in Ohio. For the last seven years, the hospital — which also operates the Cincinnati Children’s Liberty Campus in Liberty Twp. in Butler County — ranked third in the nation among all Honor Roll hospitals in U.S. News and World Report’s Best Children’s Hospitals ranking. “This...
Not a hoax: There is a tick that causes red meat allergies 

Not a hoax: There is a tick that causes red meat allergies 

Burger lovers, rib grillers, Taco Tuesday fans−listen up. The Center for Disease Control's May 2018 report that diseases transmitted by fleas, mosquitoes and ticks have tripled in recent years was bad enough, but this is even worse. One type of tick bite causes a red meat allergy. The actual ailment is galactose-alpha, or alpha-gal. It's transmitted by the Lone Star Tick, or amblyomma...
What is selfitis? 5 things to know about the obsessive selfie disorder 

What is selfitis? 5 things to know about the obsessive selfie disorder 

The term "selfitis" may have started off as a hoax back in 2014, but now psychologists have warned it's a genuine mental health issue. Researchers form the Nottingham Trent University in the United Kingdom and Thiagarajar School of Management in India actually investigated the social media phenomenon, leading them to create a "Selfitis Behavior Scale." Now, individuals...
Here’s how to identify (and get rid of) venomous spiders in your home

Here’s how to identify (and get rid of) venomous spiders in your home

Most people aren't too happy when they encounter a spider, and that's especially true if the creepy-crawly you come across happens to be venomous. Although it's understandable to be anxious about venomous spiders, it’s important to know the difference between a harmless spider and a dangerous one. Here are some important tips from experts on dealing with venomous spiders and what to do if you...
Stung by a jellyfish on vacation? Here’s what you should do

Stung by a jellyfish on vacation? Here’s what you should do

Contrary to popular belief, you really shouldn’t pee on a jellyfish sting. Jellyfish stings are on the rise in Florida, according to The Weather Channel. More than 600 people were treated for jellyfish stings over the weekend along Florida’s central Atlantic coast, according to lifeguards on the beaches. Here’s what you need to do if you suspect you’ve been stung by a jellyfish...
An hour-by-hour, easy guide to improving your energy all day long

An hour-by-hour, easy guide to improving your energy all day long

Is “just −so −tired” your constant state of being? Batteries drained? All out of oomph? Exhausted? There are so many ways to describe that blah, no energy feeling that can strike throughout the day. And while sometimes the explanation is obvious (binge-watching an entire season of Santa Clarita Diet last night may not have been the best idea), other energy sappers...
How to sleep more soundly in the summer swelter

How to sleep more soundly in the summer swelter

The rewards for getting proper shut eye (averaging at least 6 hours per night) range from boosted immunity and reduced stress to lower risk of obesity and the ever-important ability to function at work and while driving. These benefits don't alter in the slightest when summer rolls around. But when Atlanta summer temps start ranging from "sweltering" to "Inferno conditions," the...
Birth control pill recall: Taytulla packaging error could lead to unintended pregnancy

Birth control pill recall: Taytulla packaging error could lead to unintended pregnancy

Drugmaker Allergan has issued a recall for a popular birth control pill over a packaging error that could lead to unintended pregnancy. According to a news release Tuesday, Allergan is recalling one lot of Taytulla birth control pills because capsules were placed in the wrong order. The recalled products are from lot No. 5620706 and have a May 2019 expiration date. "Allergan recently identified...
Stream and dream: How to binge-watch Netflix and still get sleep

Stream and dream: How to binge-watch Netflix and still get sleep

Scientists and your average insomniac have long known that factors from stress to overly hot bedrooms to a partner's snoring can cause poor sleep. Now, there's another item for the list, one that goes in the "life is unfair" column − because it turns out that binge-watching Netflix (your source of joy, stress reduction and water cooler conversations) can cause poor sleep...
Sweet dreams: How to conquer your nightmares 

Sweet dreams: How to conquer your nightmares 

You're asleep, right? You can hardly be expected to control your actions, much less your thoughts. But if bad dreams are ruining your sleep (and affecting your waking moments), you can work to eliminate or minimize them, according to psychologists and sleep experts. "One way of thinking about dreams is that they're part of the same problem-solving processes that we use during the day time,"...
Aimovig: New migraine prevention drug approved by FDA

Aimovig: New migraine prevention drug approved by FDA

If you suffer from chronic migraines, relief is here. According to The Associated Press, the Food and Drug Administration last week approved Aimovig, a monthly shot that aims to reduce migraines. The drug, developed by Amgen Inc. and Novartis AG, is "injected monthly just under the skin using a pen-like device," the AP reported. Its price tag: $6,900 annually before insurance. But how...
New autism research could predict whether children as young as 3 months old are at risk

New autism research could predict whether children as young as 3 months old are at risk

A groundbreaking study is being done at Boston Children's Hospital that researchers say could potentially predict whether a child as young as 3 months old is at-risk for developing autism. Right now, most children can't receive a reliable diagnosis until they are at least 1 year old.  Chase Minicucci and his mother, Hillary Steele Minicucci, regularly go to Boston Children&rsquo...
Major depression diagnoses on the rise in the U.S., study finds

Major depression diagnoses on the rise in the U.S., study finds

Over the past five years, diagnoses of major depression in the United States have risen by at least 33 percent. That’s according to a new report from the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, for which analysts assessed the BCBS Health Index built from billions of claims for more than 41 million commercially insured Americans annually. >> Read more trending news  The index...
Drowning doesn't look like what you think. How to recognize the signs

Drowning doesn't look like what you think. How to recognize the signs

No yelling, no waving. Just a silent gasping for air and 20 to 60 seconds later, submersion. And someone has drowned, maybe in plain site. "Drowning is not the violent, splashing call for help that most people expect," noted Coast Guard retiree and trained rescue swimmer Mario Vittone in an article that appeared on the Army blog. "To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic...
WATCH: Pollen cloud springs from tree in sneeze-worthy viral video

WATCH: Pollen cloud springs from tree in sneeze-worthy viral video

Look away, allergy sufferers: This viral video from New Jersey might bring you to tears. On Monday, Facebook user Jennifer Henderson shared a clip of a backhoe tapping a tree in Millville – and the enormous pollen cloud that followed. >> Read more trending news  "When my husband said the pollen's bad, I probably should've taken his word for it. Crazy!" Henderson wrote...
Ohio among states battling sudden rise in Hepatitis A cases

Ohio among states battling sudden rise in Hepatitis A cases

The number of Hepatitis A cases in Ohio and neighboring states has spiked since January, the Ohio Department of Health is reporting. The are currently 31 cases in the state, the highest since 2015, the Greene County Public Health said in a release Tuesday. In comparison, there were four cases during the same period in 2017, two in 2016 and five in 2015, according to the release.  Hepatitis...
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