Health


Americans told to toss romaine lettuce over E. coli fears

U.S. health officials on Friday told consumers to throw away any store-bought romaine lettuce they have in their kitchens and warned restaurants not to serve it amid an E. coli outbreak that has sickened more than 50 people in several states. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention expanded its warning about tainted romaine from Arizona, saying information from new illnesses led it to...
Immunotherapy plus chemo doubles lung cancer survival, study says

Immunotherapy plus chemo doubles lung cancer survival, study says

Chemotherapy and radiation are common treatments for lung cancer. However, immunotherapy may be able to help double a patient’s survival, according to a new report. Researchers from New York University’s Perlmutter Cancer Center recently conducted a study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, to determine which treatments were most effective for those newly diagnosed...
Ohio gets $26M federal grant to target opioid crisis

Ohio gets $26M federal grant to target opioid crisis

Ohio received $26 million in federal funding to assist with the state’s opioid crisis response. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the second round of opioid state targeted response grants were released this week. The federal government awarded $485 million that was divided among the states and territories for efforts to prevent misuse of opioids in the first place, to expand...

UN health agency: Hungarian scientist exposed to Ebola

The World Health Organization says it has coordinated shipment of an experimental Ebola vaccine and drugs to treat a laboratory scientist in Hungary who was exposed to the potentially deadly disease earlier this month. The U.N. health agency said in an emailed statement on Friday that Hungarian officials asked for help last week after a scientist working in a normally secure laboratory had an "...
UK Supreme Court declines appeal from parents of ill toddler

UK Supreme Court declines appeal from parents of ill toddler

Britain's Supreme Court declined Friday to hear an appeal from a mother and father who want to take their terminally ill toddler to Italy for treatment instead of allowing a hospital to remove him from life support. The decision is another setback for the parents of 23-month-old Alfie Evans, who have been engaged in a protracted legal fight with Alder Hey Children's Hospital over their son's care...
LA Fitness apologizes for racial profiling incident at New Jersey club

LA Fitness apologizes for racial profiling incident at New Jersey club

LA Fitness issued an apology after two black patrons were wrongly accused of not paying at a New Jersey club and were asked to leave, CNN reported. Tshyrad Oates posted videos of the encounter, which occurred Sunday in Secaucus, New Jersey, on Facebook. Oates said he had a guest pass and his friend was a current member. Oates said in his Facebook post that a manager told them they were banned...
'Dance Moms' star Miller has cancer, underwent spine surgery

'Dance Moms' star Miller has cancer, underwent spine surgery

Former "Dance Moms" reality TV star Abby Lee Miller has been diagnosed with cancer. Doctor Hooman Melamed tells People.com she contracted what they thought was a rare spinal infection and nearly died this week. The doctor says Miller went to a California emergency room, where her condition deteriorated and she became "paralyzed from the neck down." He says Miller underwent spinal...
This month is your chance to start a more active lifestyle. Here’s how.

This month is your chance to start a more active lifestyle. Here’s how.

Keeping your heart healthy takes more than just a balanced diet and a few super foods. Exercise is just as important, and the American Heart Association is urging Americans to get out and get active in the month of April. AHA’s Move More Month encourages more Americans to get out and walk their way to better health. » TRENDING: What you should know about a crash in Springfield which left...
Some GOP officials urge charges for women who get abortions

Some GOP officials urge charges for women who get abortions

Anti-abortion rhetoric is intensifying ahead of midterm elections as officials in Republican-dominant states push legislation that would punish both doctors and patients, even though such laws are likely unconstitutional. In Idaho, Republicans competing in a crowded field for governor have made it a major campaign issue ahead of the May 15 primary. One candidate promised to back a long-shot effort...
US experts back marijuana-based drug for childhood seizures

US experts back marijuana-based drug for childhood seizures

A medicine made from the marijuana plant moved one step closer to U.S. approval Thursday after federal health advisers endorsed it for the treatment of severe seizures in children with epilepsy. If the Food and Drug Administration follows the group's recommendation, GW Pharmaceuticals' syrup would become the first drug derived from the cannabis plant to win federal approval in the U.S. The 13-member...
UN health agency: Dengue vaccine shouldn't be used widely

UN health agency: Dengue vaccine shouldn't be used widely

The World Health Organization says the first-ever vaccine for dengue needs to be dealt with in "a much safer way," meaning that the shot should mostly be given to people who have previously been infected with the disease. In November, the vaccine's manufacturer, Sanofi Pasteur, said people who had never been sickened by dengue before were at risk of developing a more serious disease after...
New data: Americans filling far fewer opioid prescriptions

New data: Americans filling far fewer opioid prescriptions

The number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers filled in the U.S. fell dramatically last year, showing their biggest drop in 25 years and continuing a decline amid increasing legal restrictions and public awareness of the dangers of addiction, new data show. Health data firm IQVIA's Institute for Human Data Science released a report Thursday showing an 8.9 percent average drop nationwide in the...
Warming, not cooling, donated livers may improve transplants

Warming, not cooling, donated livers may improve transplants

Surgeons pack donated organs on ice while racing them to transplant patients but it may be time for a warmer approach. British researchers said Wednesday that keeping at least some livers at body temperature instead may work better. The livers keep functioning until they're transplanted thanks to a machine that pumps them full of blood and nutrients. It's a life-support system for the organs, and...
Spouses can boost early detection for melanoma patients

Spouses can boost early detection for melanoma patients

There's an extra bonus to marriage for melanoma patients: They tend to be diagnosed in earlier more treatable stages than patients who are unmarried, widowed or divorced, a new study says. Spouses may be apt to notice suspicious moles on their partners that could signal melanoma, the most dangerous type skin cancer. More importantly, they may also be more inclined to nag their partners to get those...
Parenting of the future: Many embryos, each with DNA profile

Parenting of the future: Many embryos, each with DNA profile

So you want to have a baby. Would you like a dark-haired girl with a high risk of someday getting colon cancer, but a good chance of above-average music ability? Or would you prefer a girl with a good prospect for high SAT scores and a good shot at being athletic, but who also is likely to run an above-average risk of bipolar disorder and lupus as an adult? How about a boy with a good shot at having...

Citing opioid crisis, feds seek rule change for drugmakers

Drugmakers would be required to identify a legitimate need for controlled substances to justify their production under a proposed rule change intended to rein in the diversion of drugs for illicit purposes, the Drug Enforcement Administration announced Tuesday. According to the DEA, current regulations were issued in 1971 but need to be updated to reflect the nation's opioid abuse crisis and changes...
‘Being LGBTQ is not an illness’: Record number of states banning conversion therapy

‘Being LGBTQ is not an illness’: Record number of states banning conversion therapy

A record number of jurisdictions this year are taking aim at conversion therapy for minors: an attempt to change someone's sexual orientation or gender identity through tactics as obvious as hypnosis or as subtle as inducing shame.  Almost 50 bills have been introduced in 24 states targeting conversion therapy, which has been discredited by dozens of medical associations and child-welfare institutions...
Dem senator: Trump VA pick vows not to privatize vets care

Dem senator: Trump VA pick vows not to privatize vets care

President Donald Trump's pick to be Veterans Affairs secretary is promising not to privatize the agency, a key Democratic senator said Tuesday, taking a stance on a politically charged issue that his predecessor says led to his firing. The confirmation hearing of Ronny Jackson, Trump's White House doctor and a Navy rear admiral chosen to speed up improvements to the VA, is scheduled for next week...
Man with 3 faces: Frenchman gets 2nd face transplant

Man with 3 faces: Frenchman gets 2nd face transplant

In a medical first, a French surgeon says he has performed a second face transplant on the same patient — who is now doing well and even spent a recent weekend in Brittany. Dr. Laurent Lantieri of the Georges Pompidou Hospital in Paris first transplanted a new face onto Jerome Hamon in 2010, when Hamon was in his mid-30s. But after getting ill in 2015, Hamon was given drugs that interfered with...
US regulators float ideas for boosting medical device safety

US regulators float ideas for boosting medical device safety

U.S. health officials on Tuesday proposed steps to improve the government's system for overseeing medical devices, which has been criticized for years for failing to catch problems with risky implants and medical instruments. The plan from the Food and Drug Administration includes few immediate changes, but lists a number of ideas and proposals with the goal of improving safeguards on pacemakers,...
The disturbing reason behind the spike in organ donations

The disturbing reason behind the spike in organ donations

It doesn't take an in-depth reading of the letters that recipients of organ transplants write to the families of deceased donors to realize the deep connection between an ailing person's salvation and another family's grief. But a new study has added a new wrinkle to this already emotional issue of life and death: A rise in organ transplants is linked to a similar rise in drug overdose deaths across...
Marijuana-based drug gets positive review from US agency

Marijuana-based drug gets positive review from US agency

A closely watched medicine made from the marijuana plant reduces seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy and warrants approval in the United States, health officials said Tuesday. British drugmaker GW Pharmaceuticals is seeking permission to sell its purified form of an ingredient found in cannabis — one that doesn't get users high — as a medication for rare, hard-to-treat seizures...
Springfield’s Rocking Horse center adds pharmacy program

Springfield’s Rocking Horse center adds pharmacy program

The Rocking Horse Community Health Center in Springfield is expanding its services to house the city’s first pharmacy residency program. Once Cedarville pharmacy student, Josh Willoughby graduates in May, he’ll spend one year at Rocking Horse gathering information on patients and designing individual treatment plans to manage their medications. “Pharmacy is an integral part of health...
Medical marijuana push spreads to Utah, Oklahoma

Medical marijuana push spreads to Utah, Oklahoma

The push for legalized marijuana has moved into Utah and Oklahoma, two of the most conservative states in the country, further underscoring how quickly feelings about marijuana are changing in the United States. If the two measures pass, Utah and Oklahoma will join 30 other states that have legalized some form of medical marijuana, according to the pro-pot National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana...
Counterfeit cosmetics seized in LA contained lead, feces

Counterfeit cosmetics seized in LA contained lead, feces

Los Angeles police say $700,000 worth of counterfeit cosmetics seized from vendors in downtown's fashion district have tested positive for bacteria, lead and traces of animal feces. Officials said Monday that the investigation began after customers complained of rashes and other skin irritations from using the knockoff mascaras, lipsticks and eye shadows. The seized products include bogus versions...
Organs from drug overdoses could help transplant shortage

Organs from drug overdoses could help transplant shortage

Fatal drug overdoses are increasing organ donations, and researchers reported Monday that people who receive those transplants generally fare as well as patients given organs from more traditional donors. The findings could encourage more use of organs from overdose victims. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University found those transplants have jumped nearly 24-fold since 2000. That was before overdoses...
UK court rules against parents who want treatment for son

UK court rules against parents who want treatment for son

Britain's Court of Appeal ruled Monday against the parents of a terminally ill toddler who sought permission to take him to Italy for medical treatment that lower U.K. courts blocked in favor of suspending life support. The parents of 23-month-old Alfie Evans have been engaged in a protracted legal fight with Alder Hey Children's Hospital over his care. They asked the Court of Appeal to overturn earlier...
Immune therapy scores big win against lung cancer in study

Immune therapy scores big win against lung cancer in study

For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It's the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers. In the study, Merck's Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared...

Hundreds of Romanian health workers protest wage cuts

Romanian health workers are protesting pay cuts following government promises to hike salaries in the health care sector amid a general tax and wage overhaul. Some 200 medics, nurses and other health workers protested Monday at the regional Emergency Hospital in the southern city of Craiova, threatening to strike if the situation was not resolved. In the capital of Bucharest, health workers protested...
Trump builds on Obama opioid policy

Trump builds on Obama opioid policy

Deep within President Donald Trump's plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction. It's a rare instance in which Trump isn't trying to dismantle Obama administration policies, and where fractious Republicans and Democrats in Congress have come together. Trump declared last month that...
Vatican: Parents, hospital must talk in UK sick toddler case

Vatican: Parents, hospital must talk in UK sick toddler case

Pope Francis offered prayers after his traditional Sunday blessing in St. Peter's Square for Alfie Evans, a terminally ill British toddler whose parents are locked with hospital officials in a legal battle over his care. The pontiff said such situations are "very painful and complex" as he prayed for Alfie and others who are suffering serious infirmities. He expressed hope that they "...
Russians protest garbage dumps blighting Moscow region

Russians protest garbage dumps blighting Moscow region

Large protests have taken place in nine cities and towns in the Moscow region over pollution from landfills and against government plans to build a garbage incinerator. Public dismay with refuse disposal around the Russian capital increased sharply in March after scores of children in the town of Volokolamsk were sickened with symptoms of gas poisoning linked to a landfill. On Saturday, several hundred...
AP investigation: Doctors keep licenses despite sex abuse

AP investigation: Doctors keep licenses despite sex abuse

An Associated Press investigation finds that even as Hollywood moguls, elite journalists and politicians have been pushed out of their jobs or resigned amid allegations of sexual misconduct, the world of medicine is more forgiving. Even when doctors are disciplined, their punishment often consists of a short suspension paired with therapy that treats sexually abusive behavior as a symptom of an illness...
Fish oil capsules don't help dry eye symptoms, study finds

Fish oil capsules don't help dry eye symptoms, study finds

Many doctors recommend them, but fish oil supplements failed to help people with dry eye when put to a scientific test. About 14 percent of U.S. adults have dry eye, which causes pain and vision problems. It's more common in women and with age, and is related to inflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids in fish oil may reduce inflammation, so doctors thought they might help more than the artificial tears...
7 great sources of protein that aren't meat or animal products

7 great sources of protein that aren't meat or animal products

"You're vegetarian? How do you get your protein?" It's a question vegetarians (and vegans) are asked over and over again. While meat and other animal products are common sources of protein for much of the population, there are countless protein options for those on a plant-based diet, too. » RELATED: These protein powders are toxic to your health, study says Scientific evidence...
Healing process after breast cancer surgery could cause cancer to spread in mice, study says

Healing process after breast cancer surgery could cause cancer to spread in mice, study says

While mastectomies and lumpectomies are common treatments used to remove cancer cells, the disease could return within months. Doctors may now understand why, according to a new report.  Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology conducted a study, published in Science Translational Medicine on Tuesday, to explore factors that may contribute to cancer...
How to manage your spring allergies

How to manage your spring allergies

Spring is in the air, literally.  Over the next few days, many parts of the country may experience high pollen levels. Dr. Castellaw with the Baptist Medical Group said, “This is probably one of the worst allergy seasons that we have seen in years.” Castellaw said the signs are clear to see and even easier to feel. “If the drainage from your nose and things that you're coughing...
Brazil yellow fever vaccination campaign far short of goal

Brazil yellow fever vaccination campaign far short of goal

Brazil's yellow fever vaccination efforts have fallen significantly short of their goal, the Health Ministry acknowledged this week, and an official said Friday that more than 16 million people in the targeted population still need to be immunized. In January, the ministry launched a campaign to vaccinate more than 23 million people in three states affected by the largest outbreak of the mosquito-borne...
Policy on bullying eyed after 12-year-old hangs himself

Policy on bullying eyed after 12-year-old hangs himself

Andy Leach was a silly 12-year-old boy with a contagious smile before relentless bullying pushed him to kill himself, his father says. "Everybody really enjoyed to be around Andy," and he had much to look forward to — he loved being a Boy Scout and hoped to play saxophone in the high school band, Matthew Leach told The Associated Press. "So when we found out he was being bullied...
Canadian pharmacy fined $34 million for illegal imports

Canadian pharmacy fined $34 million for illegal imports

An online pharmacy that bills itself as Canada's largest was fined $34 million Friday for importing counterfeit cancer drugs and other unapproved pharmaceuticals into the United States, a sentence that one advocacy group called too light for such a heinous crime. Canada Drugs has filled millions of prescriptions by offering itself as a safe alternative for patients to save money on expensive drugs...
Study: Night owls have 10 percent higher mortality risk

Study: Night owls have 10 percent higher mortality risk

Being a night owl can be hazardous to your health, according to a new study. A study that was published Thursday in Chronobiology International revealed that people who identified themselves as “definite evening types” had a 10 percent higher risk of “all-cause mortality” than morning people, CNN reported. The study used data from 433,268 adults in the United Kingdom...
When to say when: Study says limit alcohol to 1 drink a day

When to say when: Study says limit alcohol to 1 drink a day

Here's some sobering news: A large international study says adults should average no more than one alcoholic drink per day, and that means drinking guidelines in many countries may be far too loose. The study found that people who down more than seven drinks a week can expect to die sooner than those who drink less. "What this is saying is, if you're really concerned about your longevity, don't...
The Latest: Radioactive material washed off 3 firefighters

The Latest: Radioactive material washed off 3 firefighters

The Latest on the rupture of a barrel with radioactive material at a site that includes the Idaho National Laboratory (all times local): 5:05 p.m. Federal officials say three firefighters got a small amount of radioactive material on their skin and were taken to medical facilities as a precaution after a barrel containing radioactive sludge ruptured at an Idaho Nuclear site. The U.S. Department of...
Radioactive sludge barrel ruptures at Idaho nuclear site

Radioactive sludge barrel ruptures at Idaho nuclear site

A barrel containing radioactive sludge ruptured at an Idaho nuclear facility, federal officials said Thursday, resulting in no injuries and no risk to the public but possibly slowing progress in shipping waste out of the state. The U.S. Department of Energy said the 55-gallon (208-liter) barrel ruptured late Wednesday at the 890-square-mile (2,305-square-kilometer) site that includes the Idaho National...
5 centenarians share strange secrets to longevity

5 centenarians share strange secrets to longevity

What is the secret to longevity? This question taunts all of humanity.  Although we have yet to discover a fountain of youth, centenarians – individuals who live to be over 100-years-old – can potentially give us clues on to how to live longer, healthier and happier lives. By taking a closer look at their lifestyles, genetics and social dynamics, some scientists are trying to...
$1 million federal grant will help study of transgender kids

$1 million federal grant will help study of transgender kids

The first large-scale, national study of transgender children, including some as young as 3, is poised to expand thanks to a five-year, $1 million grant awarded Thursday by the National Science Foundation to the professor leading the project. University of Washington psychologist Kristina Olson, 36, was named winner of the NSF's annual Alan T. Waterman Award, the government's highest honor for scientists...
E. coli outbreak includes Ohio: Here’s what we know

E. coli outbreak includes Ohio: Here’s what we know

Public health investigators are looking into an E. coli outbreak with 17 cases recorded so far from the strain in seven states, including one case in Ohio. The Ohio case involved a 24-year-old woman in Mahoning County who was hospitalized but has since been released, according to Ohio Department of Public Health. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control said as of April 9, six of the 17 people were...

Estonia offers free genetic testing in nationwide experiment

Estonia has started offering residents free genetic profiling in a nationwide experiment aimed at minimizing risks for typical diseases and encouraging a healthier lifestyle through personalized data reports. Lili Milani, a researcher with the Estonian Genome Center at the University of Tartu, said Thursday the scheme kicked off in March and will initially cover some 100,000 volunteers in the Baltic...
Death of loved one during pregnancy may affect child's mental health, study says

Death of loved one during pregnancy may affect child's mental health, study says

Grieving the death of a loved one can affect an entire family, including babies. In fact, losing a relative during pregnancy may affect the mental health of a child later in life, according to a new report. Researchers from Stanford University recently conducted a study, published in the American Economic Review, to determine the effect a family member’s death may have on...
Breast cancer patients may help boost survival chances by building muscle, study says

Breast cancer patients may help boost survival chances by building muscle, study says

Chemotherapy and radiation are common treatments for breast cancer. However, building muscle may also help boost chances of survival, according to a new report.  Researchers from Kaiser Permanente recently conducted a study, published in JAMA Oncology, to determine the association between muscle quality and the disease.  To do so, they examined 3,241 women from Kaiser...
Add this common snack to your diet to help avoid heart attacks, study suggests

Add this common snack to your diet to help avoid heart attacks, study suggests

Looking for ways to improve your heart health? Munching on nuts and seeds could lower your cardiovascular disease risk, according to a new report. Researchers from Loma Linda University in California recently conducted a study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, to determine which foods may contribute to heart disease risk, which can lead to high blood pressure, cardiac arrest...
Pasta could help you lose weight, study says

Pasta could help you lose weight, study says

Do you avoid pasta when attempting to drop pounds? Don’t do away with the dish just yet, because it has been linked to weight loss, according to a new report. Researchers from St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada, recently conducted a study, published in the BMJ Open journal, to determine how the Italian staple affects our health. To do so, they took a look at 30 trials that...
Avoid the pain, get the gains: 5 most common exercise-related injuries

Avoid the pain, get the gains: 5 most common exercise-related injuries

For those that take their workouts seriously, be sure to add one more fitness goal to the list: avoiding exercise injuries.  Not only does getting hurt in the gym or on the trail cut back on how much time you spend getting fit,  it's also painful and treatment can be costly. Personal trainer Justin Price, M.A. told Men's Fitness that there are two main reasons for workout-related...
Why mothers shouldn’t rush into another pregnancy

Why mothers shouldn’t rush into another pregnancy

It only takes between eight and 10 weeks after giving birth for a woman to be able to conceive another child, but that doesn’t mean it’s always the best thing for her body. While there’s no set rule as to how soon a woman should get pregnant again, a local doctor encourages women to consider giving their body enough time to physically and emotionally heal from the previous birth...
Americans binge 17 billion drinks a year, CDC estimates

Americans binge 17 billion drinks a year, CDC estimates

College students have a reputation for binge drinking, but it’s not just them. Americans drink massive amounts of alcoholic beverages, according to a new report.  Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a study, published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, to determine how much booze United States citizens down. ...
How barbershops can help trim high blood pressure in black men

How barbershops can help trim high blood pressure in black men

Black men hoping to lower their high blood pressure may want to pay their favorite barber a visit — and bring a pharmacist along. That’s according to new findings from the Smidt Heart Institute published Monday in the New England Journal of Medicine, for which a team of scientists studied 319 African-American men at high risk of heart attack and stroke recruited from...
The exercise that will tighten your abs and help with posture, balance

The exercise that will tighten your abs and help with posture, balance

Stability Ball Knee Tucks strengthen many muscle groups, including the abdominals, low back, legs and arms. Along with the larger muscles responsible for basic movement, many smaller stabilizing muscles are also targeted. Adding stability exercises to your workout has significant benefits, very importantly, helping to improve posture and balance. Execution: Place a small- to medium-size stability...
Allergic reaction to granola bar kills 12-year-old girl, family says

Allergic reaction to granola bar kills 12-year-old girl, family says

A Georgia family is in mourning after an allergic reaction to peanuts led to the death of a 12-year-old girl. Amanda Huynh had been hospitalized before for allergic reactions to peanuts, but it's still surreal for her brother that she's gone. "She meant a lot, to me, and i feel like she means a lot to the community," said her brother, Dillon Huynh. The honor roll student at Lee...
Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

Heart attack sufferers more likely to survive if doctor is away, study says

If you are recovering from cardiac arrest, doctors are essential to the healing process, right? According to a new report, you’re more likely to survive if your cardiologist is away. Researchers from Harvard University recently conducted a study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, to determine the possibility of survival for people who suffer heart attacks...
What is the DASH diet? Heart-healthy diet may also reduce risk of depression

What is the DASH diet? Heart-healthy diet may also reduce risk of depression

People who eat fruits, vegetables and whole grains may experience lower rates of depression over time. That’s according to new preliminary research published Sunday in the journal American Academy of Neurology, for which scientists examined 964 participants with an average age of 81 for symptoms of depression. Participants in the study were monitored for symptoms and asked to fill out questionnaires...
Patient blindsided by $17,850 urine test that insurer said was worth $100

Patient blindsided by $17,850 urine test that insurer said was worth $100

After Elizabeth Moreno had back surgery in late 2015, her surgeon prescribed an opioid painkiller and a follow-up drug test that seemed routine — until the lab slapped her with a bill for thousands of dollars. A Houston lab tested her urine sample for a constellation of legal and illicit drugs, many of which, Moreno said, she had never heard of, let alone taken. “I was totally confused...
Drinking this type of tea could ruin your teeth, study says

Drinking this type of tea could ruin your teeth, study says

Do you love sipping tea? Beware of the fruity flavors, because they could be bad for your teeth, according to a new report.  Researchers from King's College London Dental Institute recently conducted a study, published in British Dental Journal, to determine how certain foods and drinks can affect tooth wear.  To do so, researchers examined a previous study that compared...
Hundreds join annual heart walk at Upper Valley Mall

Hundreds join annual heart walk at Upper Valley Mall

More than 300 people, mostly in red, participated in the annual Clark and Champaign Counties Heart Walk today at the Upper Valley Mall. The local walk joins efforts by the American Heart Association to fight heart disease and stroke. The annual event also featured vendor booths and a health fair, and was sponsored by Springfield Regional Medical Center.
Springfielders could be among Ohioans self-diagnosing illnesses online

Springfielders could be among Ohioans self-diagnosing illnesses online

Has a sudden pain in your side or a splotch on your skin that wasn’t there yesterday ever sent you running to WebMD or Google instead of your primary care provider? If so, you may be one of the increasing number of Ohioans turning to the internet to diagnose what ails you. According to a survey of 3,000 adults conducted by Tinker Law Firm, almost 38 percent of Ohioans surveyed admitted they...
Racino to race despite 450 horses quarantined in Warren County

Racino to race despite 450 horses quarantined in Warren County

About 450 horses stabled at the Warren County Fairgrounds are under a quarantine declared by the Ohio Department of Agriculture, but racing is on at the local racino. The quarantine is one of a handful around the state declared because horses have tested positive for Equine Herpes Virus (EHV), most of which have been traced to a horse brought into the state from Pennsylvania, according to officials...
Infertility 'breakthrough': Human eggs fully grown in lab for the first time

Infertility 'breakthrough': Human eggs fully grown in lab for the first time

A group of scientists are touting an infertility "breakthrough" after human eggs have been grown in a lab from their earliest stages to the point of potential fertilization for the first time. Researchers from the United Kingdom and the United States conducted the research, recently publishing their results in the scientific journal Molecular Human Reproduction.  Taking ovarian...
Dayton startup company working to curb hacking of medical devices

Dayton startup company working to curb hacking of medical devices

UPDATE @ 6:25 p.m.: Hannah Hays of Dayton has been in the hospital before, but she never realized the devices used to treat her could have been hacked.  "It's very scary, especially because being in the hospital is a very vulnerable time for someone," said Hays.  Dayton startup MediTechSafe is working to stop the growing danger of medical device hacking.  There were more...
4 bizarre ways people are trying to beat death and aging

4 bizarre ways people are trying to beat death and aging

Death −it's an inevitable reality. Humans have been coming to terms with that fact for centuries. There are various theories on living longer, religious beliefs and theories on the afterlife. However, no matter the belief system we ascribe to, we are still certain that death− whether it be an end or a transition − is coming for all of us. In spite of that, there are thousands...
Don’t lose to weight-loss promotions

Don’t lose to weight-loss promotions

Losing weight ranks as one of the top New Year’s resolutions every year. Many people want fast, easy ways to shed those extra pounds. Ads promoting diet pills, special powders or weight-loss patches are everywhere (television, internet, print, etc.). These products typically guarantee quick results with little or no effort needed. However, many are ineffective and can do more harm than good...
Beware: Mixing herbal products with medication could be dangerous

Beware: Mixing herbal products with medication could be dangerous

If you're currently taking medications for depression, HIV, heart disease, cancer or epilepsy, you should avoid combining herbal remedies with your treatment, a new scientific review suggests. The research, published last month in the "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology", warns of major complications when common herbal supplements are taken in conjunction with cancer treatments...
Is 'souping' the new juicing? 5 things to know about this diet trend

Is 'souping' the new juicing? 5 things to know about this diet trend

Juicing was all the rage for a while, but for dieters looking for a new trend with similar discipline has emerged. "Souping" has the same general idea – substituting for traditional meals for a more liquid-based diet– is one of the latest trends to hit the diet statosphere. People who soup sometimes eat only soup for one or several days, or they may eat it for one meal a day...
5 things you're doing 'for your health' that aren't so healthy

5 things you're doing 'for your health' that aren't so healthy

It seems like there are new health trends popping up all the time. Some super food promising to make you live forever or some natural remedy guaranteed to make you look younger. We may roll our eyes with skepticism, suspecting that the claims are usually too good to be true. But there are actually a lot of normal things we readily do for our health, even though there is no real scientific evidence...
8 odd but effective ways to stop snoring 

8 odd but effective ways to stop snoring 

Lose any sleep from your own or your partner's snoring lately?  For many Americans, it's a lethargic yes. Snoring is a buzz kill, a sleep robber and maybe an indicator of serious health issues, including the obstructive sleep apnea that can lead to heart disease. Some 90 million American adults snore, according to sleepfoundation.org, and many could find relief with general health solutions....
Study: Heart attack care for women pales in comparison to men

Study: Heart attack care for women pales in comparison to men

A new study recently revealed that heart attack care is alarmingly unequal for women when compared to men. Researchers found that many women who have had the most serious type of heart attack − where the coronary artery is completely blocked − don't receive the same tests and treatment that men receive under similar circumstances. »RELATED: Women less likely than men to...
7 ways to cut back on sugar (and cut your cravings)

7 ways to cut back on sugar (and cut your cravings)

If you're drawn to sugary treats like a kid to the candy store, you are not alone. The average American consumes 19.5 teaspoons (82 grams) of sugar every day, which adds up to about 66 pounds of sugar per year, per person, according to the University of California San Francisco SugarScience website.  Meanwhile, the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting added...
9 ways to avoid the sick bug at your office 

9 ways to avoid the sick bug at your office 

The CDC says it's a widespread flu season and the prominent strain is more serious than usual. But even in a milder flu season, if you work outside the home, you're highly likely to pick up a bug at your workplace. Part of that's because nearly 60 percent of employees go to work when they're sick, according to a 2013 study by workplace consulting firm Kimberly-Clark Professional reported...
Is your marriage over? 7 signs it may be time to call it quits (and 5 signs to stay)

Is your marriage over? 7 signs it may be time to call it quits (and 5 signs to stay)

If all you read is the Ladies Home Journal column "Can This Marriage Be Saved?", you'd think the answer is always a roaring  yes. But that standby, a popular read since its launch in 1953, is selected by counselors of couples in situations they can salvage, especially with the help of therapists. Outside of LHJ's pages, many marriages do not last and should not last. Is yours one...
Obesity surgery safer than traditional treatments, study suggests

Obesity surgery safer than traditional treatments, study suggests

Having surgery to treat obesity may seem like a drastic option, but a new study suggests it may actually be a safer route than more traditional options. Researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Clalit Research Institute in Israel, recently published their findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association. »RELATED: New anti-obesity drug could...

Get fit: 3 mistakes to avoid while exercising

One of the greatest benefits of exercise is that it enables you to be more in tune with your body. During a workout you learn how your body reacts to different types of activity. Uncomfortable responses associated with exercise such as muscle soreness are normal, while other situations can be an indication of a more serious problem. Over-training and poor exercise form are two of the most common scenarios...
Flu virus spread by breathing, study finds

Flu virus spread by breathing, study finds

Most people believe that the influenza virus is spread through the coughs and sneezes of infected people, but new research published Thursday suggests that the flu virus is spread more easily than previously thought. Medical professionals believe that the virus is spread most often by “droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk,” according to the Centers for Disease Control...
5 questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor

5 questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor

Women who are in their 40s are in many cases reaching a new stage in their lives. Your children may be more independent, and you might have a well-established career. It can also be a time of change, when it's easier to gain weight, and you may start to see the first signs of menopause. Being informed about the changes you may face during your 40s is an important way to protect your health for many...
Good Samaritan closing: Employees still in shock 

Good Samaritan closing: Employees still in shock 

A day after the announcement that Good Samaritan Hospital will shut its doors for good at the end of the year, employees said their still trying to come to grips with the initial shock.  Some didn't know anything about it prior to the announcement, while others say they'd heard behind-the scenes rumblings. But all of them said Thursday that there's no way to prepare for the way in which they...
Premier planning to redevelop Good Sam site once hospital closes

Premier planning to redevelop Good Sam site once hospital closes

Premier Health officials have told this news organization that they want to "transform" the soon-to-be former main campus of Good Samaritan Hospital once the facility closes at the end of the year. They don't know exactly what redevelopment will look like on the site once the buildings are razed, but they say it's a process they will be here to see through. "Unlike other Dayton-based...
5 questions every man in his 40s should ask his doctor

5 questions every man in his 40s should ask his doctor

Men are notorious for not wanting to go to the doctor unless they're desperate. But routine doctor's visits – especially when you hit your 40s and beyond – can help you be as healthy as possible. Getting regular care and screenings can help your doctor catch and treat issues while they're in their earliest stages. »RELATED: 4 health questions every man in his 30s should ask his doctor...
High-salt diet could cause dementia, study finds

High-salt diet could cause dementia, study finds

Consuming too much salt can be dangerous for your health. It can cause your blood pressure and cholesterol to skyrocket, but it might also cause memory loss, according to a new report.  Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine in New York recently conducted an experiment, published in the Nature Neuroscience journal, to determine if salt was linked with memory loss. To do so, the researchers...
Pastor: Community ‘in shock’ after news about Good Samaritan closing

Pastor: Community ‘in shock’ after news about Good Samaritan closing

Hours after Good Samaritan Hospital officials announced Wednesday that the facility will close later this year, reaction about the community impact has been wide ranging. "It's devastating news, I was shocked" said Daryl Ward, pastor of Omega Baptist Church in Dayton.  His church is just down the street from Good Samaritan Hospital, and he’s had conversations with his parishioners...
Job outlook is promising for Good Samaritan employees, official says

Job outlook is promising for Good Samaritan employees, official says

After Wednesday’s announcement that Good Samaritan Hospital will shut its doors for good at the end of the year, many in the Miami Valley are wondering what will happen to the facility’s 1,600 employees. The hospital’s parent company, Premier Health, said its goal is to offer jobs to all those employees at its other facilities in the region.  RELATED: Local leaders &lsquo...
Is feeding a cold a real thing? 5 winter health myths debunked

Is feeding a cold a real thing? 5 winter health myths debunked

You've probably heard winter health myths for years and you may have even accepted some of them as fact. From being told to bundle up, so you don't catch a cold to your neighbor swearing he got the flu from his flu shot, these myths make the rounds every winter. Mom always warned you you'd get sick if you didn't bundle up before heading out in cold weather. Her advice wasn't exactly horrible, since...
4 drinks that could be sabotaging your weight loss efforts

4 drinks that could be sabotaging your weight loss efforts

When you're trying to lose weight, you may not give much thought to what you drink, but those calories definitely add up! These "liquid calories" can sabotage your weight-loss efforts, and you may not feel as full as if you'd eaten the same number of calories. Many drinks also provide little to no nutrients and are often loaded with sugar, which can further hamper your weight loss....
Lack of sunlight may cause winter weight gain, research suggests

Lack of sunlight may cause winter weight gain, research suggests

We often blame our added winter pounds on the holidays. All the gatherings of family and friends combined with good food, often take the toll on our waistlines. But if you're one of the many who laments adding a few pounds in December, it may not actually be entirely due to changes in your diet. In fact, new research suggests that a lack of sunlight may be causing some of that unwanted weight...

5 things to know if you’re trying to conceive

If you are trying to conceive, you may first want to make sure your diet is conception-promoting. Research suggests a connection between certain foods and nutrients and the probability of conception. And, it is not just women who have to watch what they eat — but also men. For men, different foods and nutrients can effect sperm count and production. For women, hormone levels and a healthy reproductive...
Are you hooked on sugar? 5 clues you might be addicted to sugar

Are you hooked on sugar? 5 clues you might be addicted to sugar

What was known to previous generations as a "sweet tooth" is known to ours as a widespread health threat. Too much dietary sugar causes or contributes to ailments and diseases from insomnia tonight to kidney failure down the road.  »RELATED: This is what 12 Diet Cokes a day can do to your body, according to Atlanta nutritionists One study from University of California San Francisco...
Trying to beat those sugar cravings? Go to sleep, says a new study

Trying to beat those sugar cravings? Go to sleep, says a new study

Cookies, and brownies and sodas, oh my! If those thoughts are often on your mind, you may need a little more sleep, according to a new study out of the United Kingdom. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition on Tuesday, found that sleeping longer hours may reduce cravings for sugary foods. »RELATED: Sugar can fuel cancerous cells, study says A small group of 21...
Concerned about E. coli? Here’s how to keep your food safe from the bacteria

Concerned about E. coli? Here’s how to keep your food safe from the bacteria

After the recent E. coli outbreak,  which killed at least two and sickened dozens of others, many are wondering what are the E. Coli symptoms and how to avoid from ever suffering from them. »RELATED: How to tell if someone around you is sick using subtle cues The following is what you need to know about E. coli and how to protect your food and yourself: E. coli is a group of bacteria...
Public health officials show off $4M clinic renovation at Reibold Building

Public health officials show off $4M clinic renovation at Reibold Building

Officials with the clinic at Public Health Dayton & Montgomery County held an open house for the upgraded third floor Tuesday where they will now offer several new services after a $4 million renovation.  Five years after a water pipe break forced several services to relocate in the Reibold Building, 117 S. Main St., the clinic has permanently moved to the third floor. The renovation resulted...
Ibuprofen use linked to male infertility, study finds

Ibuprofen use linked to male infertility, study finds

Ibuprofen is one of the most common over-the-counter pain relievers used worldwide, and researchers have long warned users about the risk of heart attack and stroke associated with the drug. But scientists now believe that ibuprofen, commonly sold under brand names such as Motrin or Advil, could potentially result in male infertility. The new findings come from researchers...
It's official: Coffee is good for you, according to new research

It's official: Coffee is good for you, according to new research

Dozens of studies have shown the striking health benefits of coffee. Regardless, many in the general public continue to believe coffee consumption is something to cut back on, not something that has positive implications for those struggling with liver disease, Type 2 diabetes, and heart disease, among others. "There's over 19,000 studies done on coffee and health. And it's very well-researched...
What's the best way to lose weight with minimal effort?

What's the best way to lose weight with minimal effort?

It's the annual concerted promise  Americans make —vowing to shed some pounds.  If you're one of the many who are trying to lose weight, but struggling, you're probably wondering how you can best do so with the minimum effort. Exercising for hours per day may not sound ideal, or even practical.  »RELATED: Want to lose more weight? Ditch your diet for a couple of weeks...
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