Health


Greek parliament to probe 10 politicians over pharma scandal

Greece's parliament voted early Thursday following a marathon 20-hour session to investigate 10 senior politicians, including two former prime ministers, over allegations they were involved in a pharmaceutical bribery scandal. The allegations follow a judicial investigation into bribes Swiss drugmaker Novartis allegedly paid to boost the sales and prices of its products in Greece. Officials in the...
Prosecutors charge health company in Milwaukee jail death

Prosecutors charge health company in Milwaukee jail death

A company that provides health care for inmates at the Milwaukee County jail faces criminal charges because employees lied about checking on a man who died of dehydration, prosecutors said Wednesday. The Milwaukee District Attorney's Office charged Miami-based Armor Correctional Health Services Inc. with seven misdemeanor counts of intentionally falsifying health records. The company is the latest...
Google’s new AI can look into your eyes and predict heart attack risk

Google’s new AI can look into your eyes and predict heart attack risk

Researchers from Google and sibling company Verily Life Sciences have developed a new algorithm using artificial intelligence to predict the risk of heart attack, stroke and other major cardiovascular events. How does it work? Through the eyes. » RELATED: Google launches 10,000-person study to predict how and when people get sick Scientists studied data from 284,335 patients and found...
Springfield’s biggest employer to merge with East Coast health system

Springfield’s biggest employer to merge with East Coast health system

Mercy Health, which operates the Springfield Regional Medical Center and Mercy Health-Urbana Hospital in Champaign County, will merge with Bon Secours Health System, a Catholic health ministry serving residents across the East Coast. Mercy Health, headquartered in Cincinnati, is the largest employer in Springfield. It’s the largest health system in Ohio and among the top five employers...
It's OK to use nasal spray flu vaccine again, US panel says

It's OK to use nasal spray flu vaccine again, US panel says

It's OK for doctors to start using a kid-friendly nasal spray flu vaccine again, a federal panel said Wednesday. Two years ago, the advisory group pulled its recommendation for FluMist vaccine after research found it wasn't working against swine flu, the kind of flu that was making most people sick then. But the Advisory Committee of Immunization Practices voted 12-2 Wednesday to recommend the nasal...
US panel recommends new adult vaccine against hepatitis B

US panel recommends new adult vaccine against hepatitis B

A federal advisory panel on Wednesday recommended a new vaccine against hepatitis B. The vaccine, called Heplisav-B, was licensed for use in the U.S. in November and is the first new hepatitis B vaccine in 25 years. Hepatitis B vaccines have been in childhood shots for decades. But vaccination also is recommended for adults at high risk of infection, including people who inject drugs, health care...
Murphy reverses Christie, approves $7.5M for women's health

Murphy reverses Christie, approves $7.5M for women's health

New Jersey's new Democratic governor signed legislation Wednesday setting aside about $7.5 million for family-planning and women's health, reversing course on former Republican Gov. Chris Christie's handling of the issue. It's the first bill that Gov. Phil Murphy has signed into law since succeeding Christie, who vetoed the spending throughout his two terms. "Today we are saying in a clear voice...
Scientists in Germany improve malaria drug production

Scientists in Germany improve malaria drug production

Scientists in Germany who developed a new way to make a key malaria drug several years ago said Wednesday they have come up with a technique to make the process even more efficient, which should increase global access and reduce the cost. The new procedure refines a method developed in 2012 at the Max Planck Institute to use the waste product from the production of artemisinin, which is extracted...
Rite Aid could be acquired by grocery operator

Rite Aid could be acquired by grocery operator

Rite Aid could be bought by a private company that operates grocery chains like Safeway and Vons. Albertsons Cos., based in Idaho, said the company is planning to buy Rite Aid’s 2,500 stores, according to the Associated Press. The announcement comes at a time when rival pharmacy chains are also looking at mergers. Drug distributor AmeriSourceBergen is looking at buying Walgreens, and CVS and...
3 things to know about proposed Medicaid job conditions

3 things to know about proposed Medicaid job conditions

Ohio is seeking approval from the federal government to require more people with Medicaid to work. When Medicaid expanded, it added coverage for about 700,000 people in the state. Now, the Republican-majority Ohio General Assembly Ohio has required the state’s Department of Medicaid ask for approval to add job conditions for those covered through the expansion. RELATED: Dayton company&rsquo...
Women may be mistaking ovarian cancer symptoms for bloating, study says

Women may be mistaking ovarian cancer symptoms for bloating, study says

According to a new research, women may be suffering from ovarian cancer without even knowing it. A study completed by Target Ovarian Cancer (TOC) shared Monday found that instead of visiting a physician after feeling symptoms including bloating and fullness, women are more likely to simply change their diets. By just switching to eating probiotic yogurts or leaving out gluten from their...
Indonesia mobilizes to combat health-damaging forest fires

Indonesia mobilizes to combat health-damaging forest fires

Four Indonesian provinces have declared emergencies in anticipation of worsening forest fires that each year spread health-damaging haze across much of Southeast Asia. The National Disaster Mitigation Agency said Wednesday that emergency alerts in Riau and South Sumatra provinces on the island of Sumatra and West and Central Kalimantan on Borneo will make it easier to mobilize fire-fighting operations...
Should Medicaid come with work requirements? Ohio says yes

Should Medicaid come with work requirements? Ohio says yes

Ohio for the first time is seeking federal approval to create job requirements as a condition to qualify for Medicaid. Most Ohio residents enrolled through the expansion of Medicaid, the state-federal health insurance program for the poor, are already working or would be exempt because of things like their age, disability or care taking responsibilities. But an estimated 36,000 residents — 5...
Idaho lawmaker not sorry for yelling 'abortion is murder'

Idaho lawmaker not sorry for yelling 'abortion is murder'

A Republican Idaho state senator yelled "abortion is murder" at a group of students who were pushing for birth control legislation at the Statehouse and now faces an ethics complaint after a post from an unverified Twitter account told them to discuss "killing babies" with a Democratic lawmaker. Sen. Dan Foreman told The Associated Press on Tuesday that he has no plans to apologize...
Report: Opioids cost Midwest construction industry billions

Report: Opioids cost Midwest construction industry billions

Opioids — including heroin and fentanyl — killed nearly 1,000 construction workers in the Midwest at a cost of more than $5 billion to the region’s construction industry in 2015, according to estimates in a new report by the Midwest Economic Policy Institute. The report confirms a trend identified by Dayton Daily News data analysis in December that showed all types of laborers &mdash...
Carbs, fat, DNA? Weight loss is finicky, new study shows

Carbs, fat, DNA? Weight loss is finicky, new study shows

A precision nutrition approach to weight loss didn't hold up in a study testing low fat versus low carb depending on dieters' DNA profiles. Previous research has suggested that a person's insulin levels or certain genes could interact with different types of diets to influence weight loss. Stanford University researchers examined this idea with 600 overweight adults who underwent genetic and insulin...

Correction: Peanut Allergy Treatment story

In a story Feb. 20 about a preventive treatment for peanut allergies, The Associated Press erroneously reported the results of previous research based on comments by Dr. Andrew Bird. Bird said he misspoke and meant to say that tolerating one peanut reduces the risk of a reaction by 95 percent, not that it protects 95 percent of children allergic to peanuts. A corrected version of the story is below...
Trump plan: Less health insurance for lower premiums

Trump plan: Less health insurance for lower premiums

The Trump administration Tuesday spelled out a plan to lower the cost of health insurance: give consumers the option of buying less coverage in exchange for reduced premiums. The proposed regulations would expand an alternative to the comprehensive medical plans required under former President Barack Obama's health law. Individuals could buy so-called "short-term" policies for up to 12 months...
South Africa's new leader winning fans with morning exercise

South Africa's new leader winning fans with morning exercise

South Africa's new President Cyril Ramaphosa is winning some fans with his habit of early-morning jogs and walks in which he chats and takes selfies with the public. Ramaphosa, who took office last week after Jacob Zuma resigned, walked with a crowd for nearly six kilometers (3.7 miles) in the Cape Town area early Tuesday. He also jogged along the city's waterfront and stopped for selfies with passers-by...
UNICEF says Pakistan is riskiest country for newborns

UNICEF says Pakistan is riskiest country for newborns

The U.N. children's agency in a report released Tuesday singled out Pakistan as the riskiest country for newborns, saying that out of every 1,000 children born in Pakistan, 46 die at birth. "It's abysmal," said Dr. Ghazna Khalid, a leading obstetrician in Pakistan's northwestern Khyber Pukhtunkhwa Province. "We don't need front-line medical doctors. We have plenty of them. We need skilled...
Stuck in an opioids crisis, officials turn to acupuncture

Stuck in an opioids crisis, officials turn to acupuncture

Marine veteran Jeff Harris was among the first to sign up when the Providence VA hospital started offering acupuncture for chronic pain. "I don't like taking pain medication. I don't like the way it makes me feel," he said. Harris also didn't want to risk getting addicted to heavy-duty prescription painkillers. Although long derided as pseudoscience and still questioned by many medical experts...
'SNL' alum Quinn recovering from heart attack with humor

'SNL' alum Quinn recovering from heart attack with humor

"Saturday Night Live" alum Colin Quinn is exercising his wit days after a heart attack interrupted his busy touring schedule. The 58-year-old Quinn took to Twitter on Monday to let friends and foes alike know he's "starting a list of those who didn't 'check in' yet," five days after his Valentine's Day health emergency. The deep-thinking comic thanks the doctors and nurses at his...
Springfield nursing home cited 31 times on health inspections

Springfield nursing home cited 31 times on health inspections

A Springfield nursing facility accused of allowing a patient to overdose after accessing unsecured narcotics has a much higher number of health citations than the state average — a total of 31, according to a federal website. Eaglewood Care center also received a statement of deficiency from the Ohio Department of Health after a patient died there in May 2016 after staff, “failed to appropriately...
Investigation at Springfield nursing home: 3 things to know

Investigation at Springfield nursing home: 3 things to know

Two patients allegedly gained access to unsecured narcotics and one of them overdosed at a Springfield nursing home, according to state documents obtained by the Springfield News-Sun. Here are three things to know about the ongoing investigation. » RELATED: Springfield nursing home investigation: Patient ODs on unlocked pills 1. State alleges deficiencies stemming from December incident The...

Correction: Florida Shooting-Mental Health story

In a story Feb. 19, The Associated Press, relying on information in an American Psychiatric Association news release, erroneously reported that the American Osteopathic Association was among medical groups that issued a statement after the Parkland, Florida, school shooting calling for action, including labeling gun violence a national public health epidemic. The APA says it mistakenly included the...
CEO of health center on Good Sam campus says it’s here to stay

CEO of health center on Good Sam campus says it’s here to stay

Obscured by the monumental news that Good Samaritan Hospital will be closed by the end of the year is that a health center on the campus expects to remain operating for years to come. “We’re not a hospital, but we’re hoping the services we can offer will meet the needs of the community,” Five Rivers Health Centers CEO Gina McFarlane-El said. The community health center, across...
Few states let courts take guns from people deemed a threat

Few states let courts take guns from people deemed a threat

The warnings around Nikolas Cruz seemed to flash like neon signs: expelled from school, fighting with classmates, a fascination with weapons and hurting animals, disturbing images and comments posted to social media, previous mental health treatment. In Florida, that wasn't enough for relatives, authorities or his schools to request a judicial order barring him from possessing guns. Only five states...
Local organizations stepping up to improve Clark County oral health

Local organizations stepping up to improve Clark County oral health

In the wake of a dental crisis in Clark County, local organizations want to improve dental health throughout the community. FIRST REPORT: Health district to pursue fluoridation in Springfield, New Carlisle More than 32 percent of Clark County residents have had between one and five permanent teeth removed because of tooth decay or gum disease, according to the most recent Community Health Assessment...
Flu hospitalizations hit 10,000 in Ohio, more than 230 in Clark County

Flu hospitalizations hit 10,000 in Ohio, more than 230 in Clark County

More than 10,000 Ohioans have now landed in the hospital because of the flu this season, according to Ohio Department of Health data released Friday. That includes 232 people in Clark County. Also, the number of people reporting flu-like-illnesses to doctors continues to rise, trending up three weeks in a row and climbing more than 18 percent during the reporting week. TRENDING STORY: Springfield...
Harming everything from heart health to sperm count

Harming everything from heart health to sperm count

A person is placing more than their lung function at risk when they put a cigarette to their mouth. In fact, everything from a person’s heart health to a man’s sperm count can be altered by the nicotine circulated through their body. “The reason for this is simple,” said Mansi Amin, DO, an internal medicine physician with Oakwood Primary Care. “There are more than 7,000...
Trump appeals California judge's curb on birth control rules

Trump appeals California judge's curb on birth control rules

The U.S. Department of Justice is appealing a California judge's decision to temporarily block new Trump administration rules allowing more employers to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women. Lawyers filed the notice of appeal to the 9th District Court of Appeals on Friday, nearly two months after Oakland-based U.S. District Judge Haywood Gilliam blocked the changes to President Barack...
I tried the sensory-deprivation float at Gravity Spa in Beavercreek

I tried the sensory-deprivation float at Gravity Spa in Beavercreek

Upon entering the Gravity Spa in Beavercreek, you immediately get the sense you’re in a place of relaxation — and not just because of the comical sign in the window asking for quietness. You’ll see aquatic-inspired artwork, hear soothing instrumental music, and smell a faint scent of essential oils. The employees are either barefoot or in socks, greeting their regulars with a hug...
Springfield nursing home investigation: Patient ODs on unlocked pills

Springfield nursing home investigation: Patient ODs on unlocked pills

Two patients allegedly gained access to unsecured narcotics and one of them overdosed at a Springfield nursing home, according to state documents obtained by the Springfield News-Sun. The Ohio Department of Health filed a statement of deficiencies for Eaglewood Care Center, 2000 Villa Road in Springfield, after the alleged incident that occurred in December. TRENDING STORY: Second sex misconduct accusation...
Flu season shows signs of leveling off

Flu season shows signs of leveling off

This nasty flu season, which has been worsening for months, may finally be leveling off. Health officials on Friday said about 1 of every 13 visits to the doctor last week was for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That's no reason for health officials to celebrate yet: That level is among the highest in a decade. But it's no worse than last week, and flu activity had been increasing each...
Critics blast EPA for lowering Syngenta pesticide fine

Critics blast EPA for lowering Syngenta pesticide fine

Critics are blasting the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for dramatically lowering a fine on agribusiness company Syngenta for violations of pesticide regulations. Syngenta, under a settlement announced this week, will pay $150,000 for improperly using the pesticide chlorpyrifos at a seed corn field in Hawaii in 2016 and 2017. It will also spend at least $400,000 to train farmers, particularly...
Flu shot only 36 percent effective, making bad year worse

Flu shot only 36 percent effective, making bad year worse

The flu vaccine is doing a poor job protecting older Americans and others against the bug that's causing most illnesses. Preliminary figures released Thursday suggest the vaccine is 36 percent effective overall in preventing flu illness severe enough to send a patient to the doctor's office. There's only been one other time in the last decade when the flu vaccine did a worse job. Most illnesses this...

Ban on abortions due to Down syndrome challenged in lawsuit

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio filed a lawsuit Thursday challenging an Ohio law prohibiting doctors from performing abortions based on a diagnosis of Down syndrome, saying claims it is an anti-discrimination effort are a masquerade. The suit against the state Health Department, state medical board and county prosecutors charged with carrying out the 2017 law was filed in federal court...
Should Springfield fluoridate its drinking water?

Should Springfield fluoridate its drinking water?

Clark County ranks among the worst in Ohio for children’s dental health, but the Springfield community remains divided over whether it should fluoridate its drinking water to address it. Clark County health leaders and local dentists believe adding fluoride to the public water supply will reduce dental decay but a vocal group of residents believe it will be harmful to the community. About 67...
Springfield drug rehab center set to open $2.3M location in March

Springfield drug rehab center set to open $2.3M location in March

One of Springfield’s largest drug and alcohol rehabilitation centers will open a new, $2.3 million facility in March after several delays. McKinley Hall will move to the larger, three-story building on Lexington Avenue. It will allow the nonprofit to be a “one-stop shop,” CEO Wendy Doolittle said. Its services currently are divided between four locations. RELATED: Drug crisis in...
McDonald's moves cheeseburgers off Happy Meal menu

McDonald's moves cheeseburgers off Happy Meal menu

McDonald's is taking cheeseburgers and chocolate milk off its Happy Meal menu in an effort to cut down on the calories, sodium, saturated fat and sugar that kids consume at its restaurants. Diners can still ask specifically for cheeseburgers or chocolate milk with the kid's meal, but the fast-food company said that not listing them will reduce how often they're ordered. Since it removed soda from...
Report details harm to Cuba diplomats but offers no cause

Report details harm to Cuba diplomats but offers no cause

Doctors are releasing the first detailed medical reports about the hearing, vision, balance and brain symptoms suffered in what the State Department has called "health attacks" on U.S. diplomats in Cuba. Still missing: A clear diagnosis of just what happened to trigger their mysterious health problems. All together, the symptoms are similar to the brain dysfunction seen with concussions...
Woman who got attention by giving birth to 7 kids has died

Woman who got attention by giving birth to 7 kids has died

Patricia Frustaci, who made national headlines in 1985 when she gave birth to seven children but struggled with the financial and publicity fallout and with the heartache of seeing four babies perish, has died. She was 63. Frustaci, who suffered from pulmonary fibrosis, died Saturday at a San Diego hospital, her eldest son, Joseph Frustaci of San Diego, said Wednesday. Frustaci was an English teacher...

Gov't says health costs to keep growing faster than economy

U.S. health care spending will keep growing faster than the overall economy in the foreseeable future, squeezing public insurance programs and employers who provide coverage, the government said Wednesday. Annual projections from number crunchers at the Department of Health and Human Services cite an aging population and an uptick in prices for health care services and goods as factors behind the...
First blood test to help diagnose brain injuries gets US OK

First blood test to help diagnose brain injuries gets US OK

The first blood test to help doctors diagnose traumatic brain injuries has won U.S. government approval. The move means Banyan Biomarkers can commercialize its test, giving the company an early lead in the biotech industry's race to find a way to diagnose concussions. The test doesn't detect concussions and the approval won't immediately change how patients with suspected concussions or other brain...

Italy court sends right-to-die case to Constitutional Court

A court in Milan has asked Italy's Constitutional Court to rule in the case of a right-to-die advocate who brought a well-known DJ to an assisted suicide clinic in Switzerland to die after he was paralyzed in a car crash. Marco Capaldo said Wednesday he was grateful that the Constitutional Court might finally establish that Italians have a right to die. Capaldo, a lawmaker with the Radical party,...

Swiss govt seeks to bar minors from tanning salons

Switzerland's government says minors should be prohibited from using tanning salons because of the long-term risk that radiation from ultraviolet beds could cause skin cancer. The seven-member Federal Council took the position Wednesday as it invited public comment on a package of safety measures meant to protect the population from exposure to UV radiation and excessively loud noises. The proposals...
New $9M Urbana health center to open this spring

New $9M Urbana health center to open this spring

Construction is on track for a new $9 million outpatient center in Urbana by a Marysville medical group and a grand opening is likely by late April or early May. Memorial Health’s outpatient medical center will be located at 1958 E. U.S. 36 and will house urgent care, lab testing services, rotating physician specialists, expanded primary care and more. The roughly 30,000-square-foot facility...
Racino to race despite 450 horses quarantined in Warren County

Racino to race despite 450 horses quarantined in Warren County

About 450 horses stabled at the Warren County Fairgrounds are under a quarantine declared by the Ohio Department of Agriculture, but racing is on at the local racino. The quarantine is one of a handful around the state declared because horses have tested positive for Equine Herpes Virus (EHV), most of which have been traced to a horse brought into the state from Pennsylvania, according to officials...
Infertility 'breakthrough': Human eggs fully grown in lab for the first time

Infertility 'breakthrough': Human eggs fully grown in lab for the first time

A group of scientists are touting an infertility "breakthrough" after human eggs have been grown in a lab from their earliest stages to the point of potential fertilization for the first time. Researchers from the United Kingdom and the United States conducted the research, recently publishing their results in the scientific journal Molecular Human Reproduction.  Taking ovarian...
Dayton startup company working to curb hacking of medical devices

Dayton startup company working to curb hacking of medical devices

UPDATE @ 6:25 p.m.: Hannah Hays of Dayton has been in the hospital before, but she never realized the devices used to treat her could have been hacked.  "It's very scary, especially because being in the hospital is a very vulnerable time for someone," said Hays.  Dayton startup MediTechSafe is working to stop the growing danger of medical device hacking.  There were more...
4 bizarre ways people are trying to beat death and aging

4 bizarre ways people are trying to beat death and aging

Death −it's an inevitable reality. Humans have been coming to terms with that fact for centuries. There are various theories on living longer, religious beliefs and theories on the afterlife. However, no matter the belief system we ascribe to, we are still certain that death− whether it be an end or a transition − is coming for all of us. In spite of that, there are thousands...
Don’t lose to weight-loss promotions

Don’t lose to weight-loss promotions

Losing weight ranks as one of the top New Year’s resolutions every year. Many people want fast, easy ways to shed those extra pounds. Ads promoting diet pills, special powders or weight-loss patches are everywhere (television, internet, print, etc.). These products typically guarantee quick results with little or no effort needed. However, many are ineffective and can do more harm than good...
Beware: Mixing herbal products with medication could be dangerous

Beware: Mixing herbal products with medication could be dangerous

If you're currently taking medications for depression, HIV, heart disease, cancer or epilepsy, you should avoid combining herbal remedies with your treatment, a new scientific review suggests. The research, published last month in the "British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology", warns of major complications when common herbal supplements are taken in conjunction with cancer treatments...
Is 'souping' the new juicing? 5 things to know about this diet trend

Is 'souping' the new juicing? 5 things to know about this diet trend

Juicing was all the rage for a while, but for dieters looking for a new trend with similar discipline has emerged. "Souping" has the same general idea – substituting for traditional meals for a more liquid-based diet– is one of the latest trends to hit the diet statosphere. People who soup sometimes eat only soup for one or several days, or they may eat it for one meal a day...
5 things you're doing 'for your health' that aren't so healthy

5 things you're doing 'for your health' that aren't so healthy

It seems like there are new health trends popping up all the time. Some super food promising to make you live forever or some natural remedy guaranteed to make you look younger. We may roll our eyes with skepticism, suspecting that the claims are usually too good to be true. But there are actually a lot of normal things we readily do for our health, even though there is no real scientific evidence...
8 odd but effective ways to stop snoring 

8 odd but effective ways to stop snoring 

Lose any sleep from your own or your partner's snoring lately?  For many Americans, it's a lethargic yes. Snoring is a buzz kill, a sleep robber and maybe an indicator of serious health issues, including the obstructive sleep apnea that can lead to heart disease. Some 90 million American adults snore, according to sleepfoundation.org, and many could find relief with general health solutions....
Study: Heart attack care for women pales in comparison to men

Study: Heart attack care for women pales in comparison to men

A new study recently revealed that heart attack care is alarmingly unequal for women when compared to men. Researchers found that many women who have had the most serious type of heart attack − where the coronary artery is completely blocked − don't receive the same tests and treatment that men receive under similar circumstances. »RELATED: Women less likely than men to...
7 ways to cut back on sugar (and cut your cravings)

7 ways to cut back on sugar (and cut your cravings)

If you're drawn to sugary treats like a kid to the candy store, you are not alone. The average American consumes 19.5 teaspoons (82 grams) of sugar every day, which adds up to about 66 pounds of sugar per year, per person, according to the University of California San Francisco SugarScience website.  Meanwhile, the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting added...
9 ways to avoid the sick bug at your office 

9 ways to avoid the sick bug at your office 

The CDC says it's a widespread flu season and the prominent strain is more serious than usual. But even in a milder flu season, if you work outside the home, you're highly likely to pick up a bug at your workplace. Part of that's because nearly 60 percent of employees go to work when they're sick, according to a 2013 study by workplace consulting firm Kimberly-Clark Professional reported...
Is your marriage over? 7 signs it may be time to call it quits (and 5 signs to stay)

Is your marriage over? 7 signs it may be time to call it quits (and 5 signs to stay)

If all you read is the Ladies Home Journal column "Can This Marriage Be Saved?", you'd think the answer is always a roaring  yes. But that standby, a popular read since its launch in 1953, is selected by counselors of couples in situations they can salvage, especially with the help of therapists. Outside of LHJ's pages, many marriages do not last and should not last. Is yours one...
Obesity surgery safer than traditional treatments, study suggests

Obesity surgery safer than traditional treatments, study suggests

Having surgery to treat obesity may seem like a drastic option, but a new study suggests it may actually be a safer route than more traditional options. Researchers at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Clalit Research Institute in Israel, recently published their findings in the Journal of the American Medical Association. »RELATED: New anti-obesity drug could...

Get fit: 3 mistakes to avoid while exercising

One of the greatest benefits of exercise is that it enables you to be more in tune with your body. During a workout you learn how your body reacts to different types of activity. Uncomfortable responses associated with exercise such as muscle soreness are normal, while other situations can be an indication of a more serious problem. Over-training and poor exercise form are two of the most common scenarios...
Flu virus spread by breathing, study finds

Flu virus spread by breathing, study finds

Most people believe that the influenza virus is spread through the coughs and sneezes of infected people, but new research published Thursday suggests that the flu virus is spread more easily than previously thought. Medical professionals believe that the virus is spread most often by “droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk,” according to the Centers for Disease Control...
5 questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor

5 questions every woman in her 40s should ask her doctor

Women who are in their 40s are in many cases reaching a new stage in their lives. Your children may be more independent, and you might have a well-established career. It can also be a time of change, when it's easier to gain weight, and you may start to see the first signs of menopause. Being informed about the changes you may face during your 40s is an important way to protect your health for many...
Good Samaritan closing: Employees still in shock 

Good Samaritan closing: Employees still in shock 

A day after the announcement that Good Samaritan Hospital will shut its doors for good at the end of the year, employees said their still trying to come to grips with the initial shock.  Some didn't know anything about it prior to the announcement, while others say they'd heard behind-the scenes rumblings. But all of them said Thursday that there's no way to prepare for the way in which they...
Premier planning to redevelop Good Sam site once hospital closes

Premier planning to redevelop Good Sam site once hospital closes

Premier Health officials have told this news organization that they want to "transform" the soon-to-be former main campus of Good Samaritan Hospital once the facility closes at the end of the year. They don't know exactly what redevelopment will look like on the site once the buildings are razed, but they say it's a process they will be here to see through. "Unlike other Dayton-based...
5 questions every man in his 40s should ask his doctor

5 questions every man in his 40s should ask his doctor

Men are notorious for not wanting to go to the doctor unless they're desperate. But routine doctor's visits – especially when you hit your 40s and beyond – can help you be as healthy as possible. Getting regular care and screenings can help your doctor catch and treat issues while they're in their earliest stages. »RELATED: 4 health questions every man in his 30s should ask his doctor...
High-salt diet could cause dementia, study finds

High-salt diet could cause dementia, study finds

Consuming too much salt can be dangerous for your health. It can cause your blood pressure and cholesterol to skyrocket, but it might also cause memory loss, according to a new report.  Researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine in New York recently conducted an experiment, published in the Nature Neuroscience journal, to determine if salt was linked with memory loss. To do so, the researchers...
Pastor: Community ‘in shock’ after news about Good Samaritan closing

Pastor: Community ‘in shock’ after news about Good Samaritan closing

Hours after Good Samaritan Hospital officials announced Wednesday that the facility will close later this year, reaction about the community impact has been wide ranging. "It's devastating news, I was shocked" said Daryl Ward, pastor of Omega Baptist Church in Dayton.  His church is just down the street from Good Samaritan Hospital, and he’s had conversations with his parishioners...
Job outlook is promising for Good Samaritan employees, official says

Job outlook is promising for Good Samaritan employees, official says

After Wednesday’s announcement that Good Samaritan Hospital will shut its doors for good at the end of the year, many in the Miami Valley are wondering what will happen to the facility’s 1,600 employees. The hospital’s parent company, Premier Health, said its goal is to offer jobs to all those employees at its other facilities in the region.  RELATED: Local leaders &lsquo...
Is feeding a cold a real thing? 5 winter health myths debunked

Is feeding a cold a real thing? 5 winter health myths debunked

You've probably heard winter health myths for years and you may have even accepted some of them as fact. From being told to bundle up, so you don't catch a cold to your neighbor swearing he got the flu from his flu shot, these myths make the rounds every winter. Mom always warned you you'd get sick if you didn't bundle up before heading out in cold weather. Her advice wasn't exactly horrible, since...
4 drinks that could be sabotaging your weight loss efforts

4 drinks that could be sabotaging your weight loss efforts

When you're trying to lose weight, you may not give much thought to what you drink, but those calories definitely add up! These "liquid calories" can sabotage your weight-loss efforts, and you may not feel as full as if you'd eaten the same number of calories. Many drinks also provide little to no nutrients and are often loaded with sugar, which can further hamper your weight loss....
Lack of sunlight may cause winter weight gain, research suggests

Lack of sunlight may cause winter weight gain, research suggests

We often blame our added winter pounds on the holidays. All the gatherings of family and friends combined with good food, often take the toll on our waistlines. But if you're one of the many who laments adding a few pounds in December, it may not actually be entirely due to changes in your diet. In fact, new research suggests that a lack of sunlight may be causing some of that unwanted weight...

5 things to know if you’re trying to conceive

If you are trying to conceive, you may first want to make sure your diet is conception-promoting. Research suggests a connection between certain foods and nutrients and the probability of conception. And, it is not just women who have to watch what they eat — but also men. For men, different foods and nutrients can effect sperm count and production. For women, hormone levels and a healthy reproductive...
Are you hooked on sugar? 5 clues you might be addicted to sugar

Are you hooked on sugar? 5 clues you might be addicted to sugar

What was known to previous generations as a "sweet tooth" is known to ours as a widespread health threat. Too much dietary sugar causes or contributes to ailments and diseases from insomnia tonight to kidney failure down the road.  »RELATED: This is what 12 Diet Cokes a day can do to your body, according to Atlanta nutritionists One study from University of California San Francisco...
Trying to beat those sugar cravings? Go to sleep, says a new study

Trying to beat those sugar cravings? Go to sleep, says a new study

Cookies, and brownies and sodas, oh my! If those thoughts are often on your mind, you may need a little more sleep, according to a new study out of the United Kingdom. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition on Tuesday, found that sleeping longer hours may reduce cravings for sugary foods. »RELATED: Sugar can fuel cancerous cells, study says A small group of 21...
Concerned about E. coli? Here’s how to keep your food safe from the bacteria

Concerned about E. coli? Here’s how to keep your food safe from the bacteria

After the recent E. coli outbreak,  which killed at least two and sickened dozens of others, many are wondering what are the E. Coli symptoms and how to avoid from ever suffering from them. »RELATED: How to tell if someone around you is sick using subtle cues The following is what you need to know about E. coli and how to protect your food and yourself: E. coli is a group of bacteria...
Public health officials show off $4M clinic renovation at Reibold Building

Public health officials show off $4M clinic renovation at Reibold Building

Officials with the clinic at Public Health Dayton & Montgomery County held an open house for the upgraded third floor Tuesday where they will now offer several new services after a $4 million renovation.  Five years after a water pipe break forced several services to relocate in the Reibold Building, 117 S. Main St., the clinic has permanently moved to the third floor. The renovation resulted...
Ibuprofen use linked to male infertility, study finds

Ibuprofen use linked to male infertility, study finds

Ibuprofen is one of the most common over-the-counter pain relievers used worldwide, and researchers have long warned users about the risk of heart attack and stroke associated with the drug. But scientists now believe that ibuprofen, commonly sold under brand names such as Motrin or Advil, could potentially result in male infertility. The new findings come from researchers...
It's official: Coffee is good for you, according to new research

It's official: Coffee is good for you, according to new research

Dozens of studies have shown the striking health benefits of coffee. Regardless, many in the general public continue to believe coffee consumption is something to cut back on, not something that has positive implications for those struggling with liver disease, Type 2 diabetes, and heart disease, among others. "There's over 19,000 studies done on coffee and health. And it's very well-researched...
What's the best way to lose weight with minimal effort?

What's the best way to lose weight with minimal effort?

It's the annual concerted promise  Americans make —vowing to shed some pounds.  If you're one of the many who are trying to lose weight, but struggling, you're probably wondering how you can best do so with the minimum effort. Exercising for hours per day may not sound ideal, or even practical.  »RELATED: Want to lose more weight? Ditch your diet for a couple of weeks...
Attention, adults: 9 ways to fight cabin fever (each under $15)

Attention, adults: 9 ways to fight cabin fever (each under $15)

Argh, winter!  Sick of the snow, ceaseless rain, being in the house − and the whining (from you not the babies)? Sounds like cabin fever, which adults suffer from more than the little ones. While it's not as serious as seasonal affective disorder, it's important to make every attempt to shake off this mind-numbing boredom or that feeling of being trapped. Just know, it can be done...
If your New Year’s resolution is to fix those arms…

If your New Year’s resolution is to fix those arms…

The Tricep Kickback is an exercise that strengthens and tones the back of the upper arm. Responsible for extension of the elbow joint, the triceps allow the arms to straighten. Most everyday activities do not use the triceps to a significant degree, making it important to add exercises to work this area. Starting Position: Grasp a dumbbell with a neutral grip (palm facing toward you) and lean forward...
The truth about the Quick Weight Loss program

The truth about the Quick Weight Loss program

Quick Weight Loss became popular around 2009, when radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh began promoting the program after losing about 80 pounds on the diet. »RELATED: These are the best diets for 2018 Although Quick Weight Loss Centers have yet to expand outside of the metro Atlanta area, the program can be joined online from anywhere in the United States. Even with celebrity endorsements, it&rsquo...
These are the best diets for 2018

These are the best diets for 2018

With so many diets and fitness fads, it can be difficult to determine which might be best for you. However, a new ranking might make the decision a little easier. U.S. News & World Report recently released its list of the best diets, including ones specifically for weight loss. For their eighth annual round-up, the publication’s editors and reporters looked into medical journals and government...
'Raw water' is the latest health craze, but is it safe?

'Raw water' is the latest health craze, but is it safe?

"Raw water", it's the latest bizarre health craze and people are willing to pay a pretty penny to get their hands on it. A December article in The New York Times brought the trend of drinking "unfiltered, untreated, un-sterilized spring water" into the national consciousness. In San Francisco, the report explained, the co-up Rainbow Grocery was selling 2.5 gallons of the stuff...
Want to join Oprah? Here are 5 things to know about Weight Watchers

Want to join Oprah? Here are 5 things to know about Weight Watchers

If you've made a New Year's resolution to lose weight, you'll have a huge number of weight-loss plans to choose from, including Weight Watchers.  Many diets can be somewhat restrictive and hard to follow in the long-term, forcing you to forgo or severely limit entire food categories, like carbs. Weight Watchers, however, has built its success on making no food off-limits. And with Oprah...
Otterbein starting $13 million face-lift, planned community in 2018

Otterbein starting $13 million face-lift, planned community in 2018

Next year, a $13 million face-lift of the building at the center of Otterbein Senior Lifestyle Choices’ main campus in Warren County and construction on the first phase of Otterbein’s Union Village planned community are to begin. On the west side of Ohio 741, Otterbein is expected to begin renovation of the campus center building, a two-phase project expected to leave it with a new facade...
Do you drink too much? Here’s what a new study says

Do you drink too much? Here’s what a new study says

Texas A&M University researchers, concerned as always for your health, say that anything more than 15 drinks a week for men and eight drinks for women is excessive. »RELATED: Even one drink per day can increase your risk of cancer, study warns That doesn’t mean you should save up for the weekend – they say anything more than two drinks per sitting for men and one drink per sitting...
5 ways to stick with your New Year's fitness resolutions

5 ways to stick with your New Year's fitness resolutions

Many people make fitness-related New Year's resolutions, only to see them fall by the wayside. It's why gyms are packed in January, but back to normal by April. How can you keep the momentum going throughout the year to achieve your goal of better health and/or weight loss? It's easy to start off the New Year full of energy and grand plans, but starting small will give you a greater chance of...
7 small, doable and meaningful New Year's resolutions you can start today

7 small, doable and meaningful New Year's resolutions you can start today

Looking for a New Year's resolution? If you want one that will actually improve your health, don't overwhelm yourself, advised employee assistance program expert Mark J. Sagor. "Successfully changing eating, activity or smoking behaviors requires steady and sustained effort and the vagaries of motivation, and the persistence of habit frequently derail the process," he noted at the CompEAP...
What is selfitis? 5 things to know about the obsessive selfie disorder

What is selfitis? 5 things to know about the obsessive selfie disorder

The term "selfitis" may have started off as a hoax back in 2014, but now psychologists have warned it's a genuine mental health issue. Researchers form the Nottingham Trent University in the United Kingdom and Thiagarajar School of Management in India actually investigated the social media phenomenon, leading them to create a "Selfitis Behavior Scale." Now, individuals...
Don't ever eat raw cookie dough, FDA warns

Don't ever eat raw cookie dough, FDA warns

If you just can't resist eating the last bits of raw cookie dough from the bowl while baking, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has a message for you: don't. As holiday bakers took to kitchens nationwide last week, the FDA reminded people to refrain from eating raw cookie dough or face the possibility of getting sick. The warning comes after the FDA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention...
Use it or lose it: 9 things to buy now with your FSA health account money

Use it or lose it: 9 things to buy now with your FSA health account money

If you have a flexible spending account, you're saving money on some of your health care expenses, which is definitely a good thing. The account allows you to save pretax dollars in an account that you can use for assorted medical expenses. The only drawback is that in many cases, you have to "use it or lose it," since most FSAs require that you spend the money in your account by the end...
Ohio flu activity elevated to highest level; ‘perfect time to get your flu shot’

Ohio flu activity elevated to highest level; ‘perfect time to get your flu shot’

As schools and offices close for the holidays and families and friends gather to celebrate, they may find an unwelcome guest among them— influenza. Flu activity in Ohio has now been elevated to the highest level, “widespread,” the Ohio Department of Health said Monday. “Widespread just means that we are seeing it in all pockets of the state,” Ohio Department of Health...
6 reasons why you're not losing weight – even though you're trying

6 reasons why you're not losing weight – even though you're trying

How many friends or colleagues have said to you they're trying to lose weight in the past week? Or perhaps you're that friend or co-worker. We often tell others – and ourselves – that we're aiming to shed a few pounds, but we don't see the results we'd like. If this describes you, you're certainly not alone. The latest statistics from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention...
The bigger the pecs: Women definitely prefer buff men, study shows

The bigger the pecs: Women definitely prefer buff men, study shows

Well men, if you need more encouragement to hit the gym, here it is. A new scientific study suggests that women definitely prefer stronger men. The research, published this week in Royal Society journal Proceedings B, had 160 women rate faceless images of male bodies. Unanimously, the women chose those that appeared physically stronger, with bigger pecs and larger arms. "We weren't surprised...
Being stubborn may help you live longer, new study suggests

Being stubborn may help you live longer, new study suggests

Stubbornness may actually be a trait that helps people live longer, a new study suggests. Published this week in the academic journal "International Psychogeriatrics", the study examined the mental and physical health of elderly Italians living in a remote village nestled between the Mediterranean Sea and mountains. The researchers behind the study, who hail from the University of Rome...
Springfield nurse practitioner’s license suspended amid state probe

Springfield nurse practitioner’s license suspended amid state probe

A nurse practitioner accused of running a pain management clinic without a license is no longer allowed to work as a nurse. The Ohio Nursing Board has suspended Douglas L. Shrewsbury’s licenses to work as a registered nurse, a certified nurse practitioner and his certificate to prescribe, according to the nursing board’s website. Shrewsbury was under investigation for allegedly operating...
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