Health


Low-carb diets can help keep the weight off, study says

There are several diets that promote weight loss, including low-carb plans. Now experts have more evidence to prove they work, according to a new report.  Researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital recently conducted a small study, published in the British Medical Journal, to determine the link between weight loss maintenance and carbohydrates.  For the first...
These jobs have the highest suicide rates in the country, CDC says

These jobs have the highest suicide rates in the country, CDC says

Jobs can be stressful, but there are some that cause more of a mental strain than others, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency recently conducted a study to determine the occupational groups with the highest suicide rates. To do so, they examined data from 17 states that participated in the 2012 and 2015 National Violent Death Reporting...

Florida sues Walgreens, CVS over opioid sales

Florida is suing the nation's two largest drugstore chains, Walgreens and CVS, alleging they added to the state and national opioid crisis by overselling painkillers and not taking precautions to stop illegal sales. Attorney General Pam Bondi announced late Friday that she has added the companies to a state-court lawsuit filed last spring against Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and several...
Woman accuses University of Colorado Hospital of removing 2 healthy kidneys

Woman accuses University of Colorado Hospital of removing 2 healthy kidneys

A 73-year-old Colorado grandmother is considering legal action after doctors at the University of Colorado Hospital removed both of her healthy kidneys in May, KDVR reported. >> Read more trending news  Linda Woolley, of Englewood, said doctors told her surgery was necessary because she likely had kidney cancer, the television station reported. However, KDVR obtained a copy of...

Criminal case as pollution surges in Russian river

Russian investigators have opened a criminal case after finding pollution levels in a local river far exceeded norms, with ethyl alcohol levels charted at 5,400 times the acceptable limit. This was just one of several indicators reported Friday by the North-Western Transport Investigation Department that the Novaya river in St. Petersburg is over-polluted. Investigators found high levels of butyl...
Minnesota mom convicted of murder now helps raise mental health awareness

Minnesota mom convicted of murder now helps raise mental health awareness

Fifteen years after tossing her twins off a bridge into the Mississippi River, a Minnesota woman is using her story to raise awareness about mental illness, KARE reported. >> Read more trending news  Naomi Gaines was 24 when she threw her 14-month-old sons, Sincere Understanding Allah and Supreme Knowledge Allah, into the river near St. Paul on July 4, 2003, and then jumped into the...
New Mexico author sues hospital for reviving her 

New Mexico author sues hospital for reviving her 

A lawsuit filed on behalf of a New Mexico author alleges that a Santa Fe hospital revived the woman in violation of her “do not resuscitate” directive while she was in the facility’s care in 2016, the Albuquerque Journal reported. >> Read more trending news  The lawsuit filed in New Mexico state district court against Santa Fe's Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical...

New Mexico woman sues hospital for resuscitating her

A New Mexico woman who was brought back to life is suing the hospital for violating her rights. The Albuquerque Journal reports lawyers for Jamie Sams filed a lawsuit this week in New Mexico state district court against Santa Fe's Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center. The lawsuit filed on behalf Sams, a writer known for books on spirituality, says the hospital and a doctor who was treating...

Texas hospital system accused of holding patients illegally

A Texas corporation that runs behavioral health hospitals is accused of illegally holding four patients, two of whom were voluntary patients who were allegedly prohibited from leaving. SAS Healthcare Inc. was indicted Wednesday on nine counts of violating the Texas Mental Health Code, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. The indictment alleges the corporation known as Sundance Behavioral Healthcare...
Jennie-O recalling ground turkey in salmonella outbreak

Jennie-O recalling ground turkey in salmonella outbreak

Jennie-O Turkey recalled ground turkey in a salmonella outbreak, and regulators say additional products from other companies could be named as their investigation continues. The recall was the first — not counting pet food — tied to a widespread and ongoing outbreak that has resulted in one death and 164 reported illnesses in 35 states. Jennie-O's parent company, Austin, Minnesota-based...
North Korea running low on TB meds, experts fear epidemic

North Korea running low on TB meds, experts fear epidemic

The withdrawal of a major international aid organization threatens to leave tens of thousands of tuberculosis patients in North Korea without the medication they need and could spiral into a severe crisis if it is not addressed soon, according to health experts familiar with the situation in the North. The dwindling stockpile of crucial medications follows the abrupt departure of the Global Fund to...
Batkid Miles Scott is healthy and thriving now cancer-free

Batkid Miles Scott is healthy and thriving now cancer-free

San Francisco's beloved Batkid is cancer-free and thriving. On the five-year anniversary of the day that then-5-year-old Miles Scott captured the hearts of millions by saving the day in San Francisco as "Batkid" — his Make-A-Wish Foundation dream accomplished at last — the fifth-grader is healthy and active. The Greater Bay Area chapter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation provided...
Meditation helps vets with post-traumatic stress disorder

Meditation helps vets with post-traumatic stress disorder

Meditation worked as well as traditional therapy for military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder in a small experiment sponsored by the Department of Defense. One method preferred by the Department of Veterans Affairs is exposure therapy, but it doesn't work for everyone and many can't handle what it requires: purposely recalling traumatic events and confronting emotions. Meditation could...

Nurse's kidney donation triggers bi-state transplant chain

A nurse's decision to donate a kidney to a patient triggered a series of events that led to three people getting new organs at two Kansas City-area hospitals. Christa Jordan, a nurse at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, wanted to donate to her friend and patient, Dayshanae Hosman, who has a genetic condition called Alagille syndrome and went on dialysis in April, the Kansas City...
Corrected study: Building, mining have high suicide rates

Corrected study: Building, mining have high suicide rates

U.S. health officials say the workers with the highest suicide rates have construction, mining and drilling jobs. That was the finding of a report correcting an earlier study that mistakenly said farmers, lumberjacks and fishermen killed themselves most often. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a corrected study Thursday. CDC officials said the 2016 study 's mistakes included...

The Latest: Environmentalist blasts new pesticide guidelines

The Latest on California's recommended new restrictions on a widely used pesticide blamed for harming the brains of babies.(all times local): 11:15 a.m. An environmental group is blasting new recommendations by California regulators to curb a widely used pesticide blamed for harming the brains of babies. The Pesticide Action Network says the state's recommended rules for chlorpyrifos (klohr-PY'-rih-fohs)...
Smoke spreading from California fires sparks health concerns

Smoke spreading from California fires sparks health concerns

Smoke masks. Eye drops. No outdoor exercise. This is how Californians are trying to cope with wildfires choking the state, but experts say an increase in serious health problems may be almost inevitable for vulnerable residents as the disasters become more commonplace. Research suggests children, the elderly and those with existing health problems are most at risk. Short-term exposure to wildfire...
Experts seek ways to boost extreme wildfire survival rates

Experts seek ways to boost extreme wildfire survival rates

Creating fire buffers between housing and dry brush, burying spark-prone power lines and lighting more controlled burns to keep vegetation in check could give people a better chance of surviving wildfires, according to experts searching for ways to reduce growing death tolls from blazes in California and across the U.S. West. Western wildfires have grown ever more lethal, a grim reality driven by...
FDA to crack down on menthol cigarettes, flavored vapes

FDA to crack down on menthol cigarettes, flavored vapes

In a major new effort to curb smoking, a top U.S. health official pledged Thursday to try to ban menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars and tighten rules governing the sale of most flavored versions of electronic cigarettes. The proposed restrictions were aimed mainly at reducing smoking in kids: About half of teens who smoke cigarettes choose menthols, and flavored e-cigarettes have been blamed for...
Twins separated by surgery are healing, sticking together

Twins separated by surgery are healing, sticking together

Medical staff say that conjoined twins from Bhutan who were separated at an Australian hospital last week have been healing well, showing their cheeky side, and have become impossible to keep apart. Joe Crameri, the head of pediatric surgery at Melbourne's Royal Children's Hospital, told reporters Thursday there have been a few bumps along the road but that the 15-month-old girls, Nima and Dawa, are...
Farm animals may soon get new features through gene editing

Farm animals may soon get new features through gene editing

Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty. A company wants to alter farm animals by adding and subtracting genetic traits in a lab. It sounds like science fiction, but Recombinetics sees opportunity for its technology in the livestock industry. But first, it needs to convince regulators that gene-edited animals are no different than conventionally...

Draft EPA study finds newer nonstick compound may be harmful

Long-term exposure to a chemical compound currently used for making nonstick coatings appears to be dangerous, even in minute amounts, according to draft findings released Wednesday by the Environmental Protection Agency. It was the first time EPA weighed in on newer, supposedly safer versions of an increasingly scrutinized family of stick- and stain-resistant compounds. Older versions of the compound...

Food safety officials stress safe handling of raw turkey

Food safety officials are stressing the importance of proper handling and cooking practices amid a nationwide outbreak of drug-resistant Salmonella found in raw turkey, with Thanksgiving approaching. The Centers for Disease Control last week said the number of reported illnesses has nearly doubled since July to 164. Minnesota has the most cases at 16. There's been one reported death , in California...
Man whose wife died after collapse at hospital gets apology

Man whose wife died after collapse at hospital gets apology

A man whose wife collapsed outside a locked hospital emergency room door and later died has received a face-to-face apology from the chief executive of the hospital's parent company. Patrick Wardell, CEO of Cambridge Health Alliance, told Peter DeMarco during a two-hour meeting at the headquarters of The Boston Globe on Tuesday that he was "very sorry" for what happened. "I can understand...
What is seasonal affective disorder?

What is seasonal affective disorder?

People who get more than just blue in the winter months may find they have seasonal affective disorder, or SAD. Before self-diagnosing, it’s important to research the disorder and speak with a health care provider. Here are some things to know about SAD. >> Read more trending news  What is it?  According to the National Institutes of Health, SAD, also called seasonal...
US officials report a record number of tick diseases

US officials report a record number of tick diseases

U.S. health officials say a record number of tick-borne diseases were reported last year. The 2017 tally of more than 59,000 cases is a 22 percent increase from the previous year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released the numbers Wednesday. Lyme disease accounted for nearly three-quarters of the illnesses. That's about 43,000 cases. Traditionally about 30,000 cases of Lyme disease...
Overweight? You might be getting paid less, study says

Overweight? You might be getting paid less, study says

A new study from researchers at LinkedIn suggests workers who are overweight get paid less than their slimmer counterparts. The findings are part of a survey involving 4,000 workers in the United Kingdom.  Survey respondents who classified as obese reported earning an average £1,940 ($2,512) less per year than those with healthy BMIs, according to the study. Twenty-five percent...
Spanking children is harmful and ineffective, pediatricians group warns

Spanking children is harmful and ineffective, pediatricians group warns

To spank or not to spank? A group of pediatricians is against it, according to a new report. Researchers from the American Academy of Pediatrics recently released a new policy statement, published in the Pediatrics journal, to recommend “healthy forms of discipline” to parents.  The new statement comes 20 years after the 1998 recommendation, which encouraged...
Cancer expected to surpass heart disease as leading cause of death in US, study says

Cancer expected to surpass heart disease as leading cause of death in US, study says

Cancer will soon be the leading cause of death in the United States, according to a new report.  Researchers recently conducted a study, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine journal, to explore data that suggests cancer will surpass heart disease as the leading cause of death in America. To do so, they examined the death records of more than 32 million adults, aged...
Next generation of biotech food heading for grocery stores

Next generation of biotech food heading for grocery stores

The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are expected to begin selling. It's a different technology than today's controversial "genetically modified"...
Juul halts store sales of some flavored e-cigarettes

Juul halts store sales of some flavored e-cigarettes

The nation's leading e-cigarette maker is halting store sales of some flavors to deter use by kids. The move by Juul Labs Inc. comes ahead of an expected U.S. government crackdown on underage sales of flavored e-cigarettes. Juul said it stopped filling store orders Tuesday for mango, fruit, creme and cucumber pods and will resume sales only to retailers that scan IDs and take other steps to verify...

Mayo Clinic receives record $200M gift from Michigan donor

A corporate strategist from Michigan has given Mayo Clinic its largest gift ever — $200 million. The Rochester-based medical center announced Tuesday that its School of Medicine will be named for the philanthropist, Jay Alix, of Birmingham, Michigan. He also has been named to the Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees. Alix said his interest in Mayo began in the 1980s when he studied its business model...

WHO official predicts 6 more months battling Ebola in Congo

The emergencies chief for the World Health Organization predicted Tuesday that Congo's Ebola outbreak will last at least another six months, saying that informal health facilities have become "major drivers" of the current, deadly transmission. Dr. Peter Salama said that makeshift "tradi-modern" health centers — offering both traditional and modern treatment — were...

More US kids get paralyzing illness, cause is still unknown

More children have been diagnosed with a mysterious paralyzing illness in recent weeks, and U.S. health officials said Tuesday that they still aren't sure what's causing it. This year's count could surpass the tallies seen in similar outbreaks in 2014 and 2016, officials said. Fortunately, the disease remains rare: This year, there have been 90 cases spread among 27 states, the Centers for Disease...
No accounting for these tastes: Artificial flavors a mystery

No accounting for these tastes: Artificial flavors a mystery

Six artificial flavors are being ordered out of the food supply in a dispute over their safety, but good luck to anyone who wants to know which cookies, candies or drinks they're in. The dispute highlights the complex rules that govern what goes in our food, how much the public knows about it, and a mysterious class of ingredients that has evolved over decades largely outside of public view. On food...
More leeway for states to expand inpatient mental health

More leeway for states to expand inpatient mental health

The Trump administration Tuesday allowed states to provide more inpatient treatment for people with serious mental illness by tapping Medicaid, a potentially far-reaching move to address issues from homelessness to violence. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar made the announcement Tuesday in a speech to state Medicaid directors, a group that represents Republican and Democratic officials...
Texas grandma drops 100 pounds by walking

Texas grandma drops 100 pounds by walking

A Texas grandmother was told to lose weight because her health was threatened. Six years later, she is 100 pounds lighter and is feeling great. >> Read more trending news  “Some grandmothers play bingo," Greta Ross, 61, told WFAA. "But, this grandmother goes to the gym." Ross, from Irving, said she used to weigh 237 pounds. She refused medication from doctors but...
AP Interview: US VP's wife champions art therapy in Japan

AP Interview: US VP's wife champions art therapy in Japan

Karen Pence, the U.S. vice president's wife, announced Tuesday a $54,000 U.S. grant to a teacher at Tsukuba University in Japan for the study of art therapy, a little-known mental health profession she has championed under the Trump administration. Pence was in Japan while accompanying her husband, Mike Pence, on a trip through Asia for a series of meetings, including a Southeast Asian summit in Singapore...
Amid drug crisis, spiritual first responders hit the streets

Amid drug crisis, spiritual first responders hit the streets

Sidewalk prayers near shoot-up spots. Sunday sermons in the back of a bar. Pleas to struggling souls to surrender to God. Funerals for members of their flock who didn't make it. Clergy members have become spiritual first responders in the opioid crisis, often leaving the pulpit to minister on the streets. They can be reverends, rabbis, priests or pastors. Though their faiths differ, they invariably...
More women in poor countries use contraception, says report

More women in poor countries use contraception, says report

More women and girls in poor countries are using modern contraception, signifying progress in efforts to involve women in family planning, according to a report released Monday. The number of women and girls using contraceptives in 69 of the world's poorest countries surpassed 317 million in 2018, representing 46 million more users than in 2012, said the report by Family Planning 2020, a U.N.-backed...
New exercise guidelines: Move more, sit less, start younger

New exercise guidelines: Move more, sit less, start younger

Move more, sit less and get kids active as young as age 3, say new federal guidelines that stress that any amount and any type of exercise helps health. The advice is the first update since the government's physical activity guidelines came out a decade ago. Since then, the list of benefits of exercise has grown, and there's more evidence to back things that were of unknown value before, such as short...
Ohio impacted by salmonella outbreak: What you really need to know

Ohio impacted by salmonella outbreak: What you really need to know

Just as Thanksgiving nears, more than 70 new cases of salmonella have been linked to raw turkey products, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While the outbreak was first announced in July, more cases have popped up in recent months. Approximately 164 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Reading have been reported from 35 states, as of early November. One...
High blood pressure by this age raises heart attack risk, study says

High blood pressure by this age raises heart attack risk, study says

High blood pressure can increase your risk of heart disease. But if you have the condition at a young age, your chances may be even higher. Researchers from Duke University recently conducted a study, published in JAMA, to explore hypertension in younger adults based on new blood pressure levels set by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. In 2017...
This is when your body burns the most calories, study says

This is when your body burns the most calories, study says

There are plenty of ways to burn calories. One of the ways to burn more could be linked to the time of day your workout happens. Researchers from Harvard Medical School recently conducted a small study, published in Current Biology journal, to determine how circadian rhythms, which control the body’s sleep cycles, influence calorie burning. To do so, they examined adults...
Heart meeting features fish oil, vitamin D, cholesterol news

Heart meeting features fish oil, vitamin D, cholesterol news

Fish oil, vitamin D, novel drugs, new cholesterol guidelines: News from an American Heart Association conference over the weekend reveals a lot about what works and what does not for preventing heart attacks and other problems. Dietary supplements missed the mark, but a prescription-strength fish oil showed promise. A drug not only helped people with diabetes control blood sugar and lose weight, but...
Big studies give mixed news on fish oil, vitamin D

Big studies give mixed news on fish oil, vitamin D

Taking fish oil or vitamin D? Big studies give long-awaited answers on who does and does not benefit from these popular nutrients. Fish oil taken by healthy people, at a dose found in many supplements, showed no clear ability to lower heart or cancer risks. Same for vitamin D. But higher amounts of a purified, prescription fish oil slashed heart problems and heart-related deaths among people with...

Congo ministry says Ebola outbreak worst in nation's history

Congo's latest Ebola outbreak is the worst in the country's recorded history with 319 confirmed and probable cases, the health ministry said. The deadly virus has killed about 198 people since the outbreak was declared Aug. 1 in the volatile east, the ministry said. Those dead include 163 confirmed Ebola cases, with 35 probable deaths. Nearly 100 people have survived Ebola. This is Congo's 10th outbreak...
Utah latest state to legalize medical pot, expand Medicaid

Utah latest state to legalize medical pot, expand Medicaid

Voters in conservative Utah have decided to join the growing number of states legalizing medical marijuana and expanding Medicaid to cover tens of thousands more low-income residents, two issues that had long stalled out with conservative state lawmakers. Utah will be on the list of more than 30 states allowing patients legal access to medical marijuana after the plan maintained a vote lead in in...
FDA warns some EpiPen labels could delay use during emergency

FDA warns some EpiPen labels could delay use during emergency

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning that the labels on some EpiPen and EpiPen Jr. auto-injectors – including authorized generic versions – might prevent the device from easily sliding out of their carrier tubes. A letter to health care professionals from Pfizer, the manufacturer of the Mylan EpiPen, said the sticker on the auto-injector unit “may have been...
Duncan Hines recalls some cake mixes over salmonella risk

Duncan Hines recalls some cake mixes over salmonella risk

Duncan Hines announced it is recalling several varieties of cake mix due to potential threat of salmonella contamination. The company said the Centers for Disease and Control Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a potential salmonella outbreak that may be linked to Duncan Hines Classic White cake mix. Duncan Hines said it has voluntarily recalled...
It takes a team to navigate cancer journey

It takes a team to navigate cancer journey

After more than two years, Janet Holman can still rattle off the monumental dates of her breast cancer journey. On Aug. 8, 2016, she noticed a large bump on her chest. On Aug. 29, 2016, Thomas A. Heck, MD, performed an ultrasound-guided biopsy. Dr. Heck is the surgical director of the breast center at Miami Valley Hospital North and a certified physician with MD Anderson Cancer Network®, a program...
Acute flaccid myelitis: Mom traveling to D.C. to fight polio-like illness

Acute flaccid myelitis: Mom traveling to D.C. to fight polio-like illness

A devastating disease is infecting children across the country. A mother from Washington state says there's more to be done to fight AFM, which causes debilitating paralysis in children. She is leading a group of moms to get Congress involved. "The CDC gave it a name in 2014," said Heather Werdal of Bremerton. "AFM stands for acute flaccid myelitis," she said. The...
Midterm elections: How to avoid stress before, after Election Day

Midterm elections: How to avoid stress before, after Election Day

No matter who you want to win and whether you’re watching all the coverage alone or with hundreds of political allies, the midterm elections can be stressful. But there is a secret strategy for avoiding some or all of the attendant anxiety pre- and post-Election Day.  Here are a few tips from two Atlanta-area women who help people reduce stress and seek wellness as part of their...
Powerful new drug Dsuvia sparks fears amid opioid epidemic

Powerful new drug Dsuvia sparks fears amid opioid epidemic

A new drug approved by the FDA has caught the attention of those on the front lines of fighting the opioid epidemic. Dsuvia, made by a 13-year-old California-based company, AcelRx Pharmaceuticals, is a powerful opioid that is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine and stronger than fentanyl. It’s “very scary,” said Alpharetta, Georgia, resident Dawn Camarda, who formed...
Common diabetes medication may protect against blindness, study says

Common diabetes medication may protect against blindness, study says

While a common diabetes medication can help lower blood sugar levels, it may also be able to protect against blindness, according to a new report. Researchers from health institutions in Taiwan conducted a study, recently presented at an American Academy of Ophthalmology conference, to determine the relationship between metformin, a common diabetes medication, and age-related macular degeneration...
Eating this snack right before bed may help with weight loss, study says

Eating this snack right before bed may help with weight loss, study says

Do you have a go-to midnight snack? Consider having a quick bite before bed, because one dairy product may help you maintain your overall health, according to a new report.  Researchers from Florida State University recently conducted a small study, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, to explore how eating whole food proteins such as cottage cheese before bed can affect...
Common blood pressure medication linked to greater lung cancer risk, study says

Common blood pressure medication linked to greater lung cancer risk, study says

While hypertension medication can help lower blood pressure levels, it might also increase your risk of lung cancer, according to a new report.  Researchers from McGill University in Canada recently conducted a study, published in The British Medical Journal, to determine the link between lung cancer and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor...
This type of weather could increase your heart attack risk, study says

This type of weather could increase your heart attack risk, study says

There are several factors that could increase your heart risk, including a poor diet and obesity. However, the weather may also contribute to that risk, according to a new report.  Researchers from Lund University in Sweden recently conducted a study, published in JAMA Cardiology, to determine the association between different weather conditions and the incidence of cardiac...
Acute flaccid myelitis: 155 cases of polio-like illness under investigation, CDC says

Acute flaccid myelitis: 155 cases of polio-like illness under investigation, CDC says

More people are getting sick from a rare condition that can paralyze children. The Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday it is investigating 155 patients who may have acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM. That is nearly 30 new cases from last week. A Georgia woman wants people to know that it can affect adults, too. Tandrea Watkins of Clayton County is paralyzed...
How bad will flu season be this year? 5 things you need to know

How bad will flu season be this year? 5 things you need to know

The flu season last year was one of the worst on record, and health officials are urging people to get the flu shot early this year. Flu season runs through fall and winter, peaking somewhere in between December and February. “While flu spreads every year, the timing, severity, and length of the season varies from one season to another,” according to the Centers for Disease Control...
Skipping workouts worse for health than smoking, diabetes, study says

Skipping workouts worse for health than smoking, diabetes, study says

Diabetes and heart disease certainly affect your health. However, not exercising may be even more detrimental, according to a new report.  Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic recently conducted a study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open, to determine the association between cardiorespiratory fitness and long-term mortality.  To do so, ...
From ‘Why me?’ to ‘Thank you’

From ‘Why me?’ to ‘Thank you’

Lying on her stomach with her breasts lined up in little holes and her arms spread out like Superman, Amy Hamilton had a thought. “At that moment, I had a big revelation: nobody knows what kind of car I came here in; nobody knows what kind of house I came from this morning; nobody knows what kind of jewelry I wear, or anything,” she said. “When it comes down to it, we’re all...
Former cancer care center director says cancer ‘rocked’ her world

Former cancer care center director says cancer ‘rocked’ her world

After more than 30 years of dedicating her life to educating and supporting cancer patients, Jean Heath suddenly found herself on the other side of the table. The former director of Upper Valley Medical Center’s Cancer Care Center was not only a cancer expert; she now was also a cancer patient. “Cancer doesn’t distinguish between who you are. Just because I’ve worked in cancer...
Your guide to breast cancer treatment here and across Ohio

Your guide to breast cancer treatment here and across Ohio

Cancer. It’s a word no one wants to hear. But, according to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 266,120 women in the United States will likely be diagnosed with breast cancer this year and close to 41,000 women will die from the disease. An additional 2,550 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer, with close to 500 men dying from it. But there is good news. Death rates from breast cancer...
A SURVIVOR’S GUIDE: Dos and Don’ts when supporting someone with cancer

A SURVIVOR’S GUIDE: Dos and Don’ts when supporting someone with cancer

When it comes to Metastatic Breast Cancer, Pink Ribbon Girls can share more stories than they would like to admit. The Pink Ribbon Girls are a non-profit that provides free direct services to clients with breast and gynecological cancers. It’s the harsh reality of the work they are in. Sixty percent of the clients the PRG currently serve are living with Mets Cancer. This means, 60 percent of...
Ready-to-eat salad recalled for possible salmonella, listeria 

Ready-to-eat salad recalled for possible salmonella, listeria 

Ready-to-eat salad with meat products that contain a corn ingredient have been recalled due to possible salmonella and listeria monocytogenes contamination, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.  More than 700 pounds of salad products were recalled by a Green Cove Springs, Florida, establishment known as GHSE LLC. The possible contamination...
Acute flaccid myelitis: CDC sees rise in cases, seasonal pattern to polio-like illness

Acute flaccid myelitis: CDC sees rise in cases, seasonal pattern to polio-like illness

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is reporting an increase in cases of a rare polio-like illness affecting kids. So far this year, the CDC has confirmed 62 cases acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM, in 22 states, and has received reports of 127 patients who are under investigation. >> Read more trending news  The CDC started detecting the increases in 2014. Since, then there...
Salmonella outbreak linked to raw chicken sickens 92 people nationwide, CDC says

Salmonella outbreak linked to raw chicken sickens 92 people nationwide, CDC says

Salmonella linked to raw chicken has made dozens of people sick across the country, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday.  In total, 92 people from 29 states have been sickened in the outbreak.  The CDC said 21 people have been hospitalized, but no one has died.  The people who became sick reported eating different types and brands of chicken products...
5 children hospitalized with polio-like sudden paralysis in Washington state

5 children hospitalized with polio-like sudden paralysis in Washington state

Five children in Washington state have been hospitalized for the sudden onset of paralysis of one or more of their limbs, Washington State Department of Health officials announced Wednesday. Health department officials are working with experts to confirm whether the children have acute flaccid myelitis (AFM).  All five of the infants and children are younger than 6 years old. ...
Acute flaccid myelitis: Why is mysterious polio-like illness afflicting children so badly?

Acute flaccid myelitis: Why is mysterious polio-like illness afflicting children so badly?

The mysterious polio-like disease that may be afflicting three children in Pittsburgh and others in Minnesota is raising a lot of concern. Pittsburgh's WPXI sat down with Dr. Jennifer Preiss from the Allegheny Health Network to talk about acute flaccid myelitis, also known as AFM. “It’s bringing back a lot of hysteria, and if you knew anyone who lived during the polio time, there was a...
Three potential side effects of breast cancer treatments

Three potential side effects of breast cancer treatments

Cancer is a painful, potentially life-threatening disease. Though discomfort might be the first warning sign that compels people to visit their physicians on the road to receiving a cancer diagnosis, cancer treatments can produce a host of side effects, including pain, as well. According to the Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, breast cancer treatments can create both long-term side effects and late side...
Early-stage breast cancer patients do just as well without chemotherapy

Early-stage breast cancer patients do just as well without chemotherapy

What type of breast cancer do I have? How long will I need to receive treatment? How effective will it be? A breast cancer diagnosis brings a crowd of questions, but one about treatment often looms large. “Perhaps the biggest question people have is, ‘Will I need to have chemotherapy or not?’ Thankfully, we now have an encouraging answer for the majority of patients with an early-stage...
Key to fighting cancer sometimes rests within us

Key to fighting cancer sometimes rests within us

Cancer researchers have found a treatment known as immunotherapy can be a powerful weapon in helping doctors and patients battle different forms of the disease. Immunotherapy is a treatment that uses certain parts of a person’s immune system to fight cancer and other diseases, according to the American Cancer Society. The approach can be used in two ways. First, it can be utilized to stimulate...
Women facing breast reconstruction have a new option

Women facing breast reconstruction have a new option

Most women who have mastectomies to treat or prevent breast cancer are eligible for breast reconstruction. Premier Health is helping these patients prepare for reconstructive surgery following mastectomy with a tissue expander that produces less pain and discomfort and requires fewer trips to the doctor. A tissue expander is a balloon-like device that has a soft, expandable polymer shell and is gradually...
Can diet prevent breast cancer from spreading?

Can diet prevent breast cancer from spreading?

Healthy diets that include plenty of antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables that can boost the body’ s natural immune system can help people in their fight against cancer. While some foods, namely unhealthy, high-fat/high-caloric foods, are best avoided, women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer who want to prevent the spread of cancer to other areas of their bodies may want to cut some...
Cancer survivor, 86, leads breast-knitting campaign

Cancer survivor, 86, leads breast-knitting campaign

Pat Anderson admits to spending nearly half of every day knitting in her living room rocking chair. But don’t underestimate this hard-working philanthropist. Anderson, 86, is the founder of the Sisterhood of the Boobless Wonders, and the fashion accessories she turns out in her “knocker rocker” each day are knitted pairs of breast-shaped bra inserts that she calls “Busters...
Regrowing and caring for hair after chemotherapy

Regrowing and caring for hair after chemotherapy

Chemotherapy and radiation are common treatment options for people who have been diagnosed with cancer. While radiation may be targeted at specific areas, chemotherapy is systemic. This means it affects the entire body. As a result, as chemotherapy kills fast-growing cancer cells, it also kills or slows the growth of healthy cells, including hair cells, that divide and grow quickly, explains the National...
What to expect before and after mastectomy surgery

What to expect before and after mastectomy surgery

Mastectomy is a treatment for women diagnosed with breast cancer or those who are genetically predisposed to cancer. The removal of one or both breasts, mastectomy surgery may involve removing just the breast tissue or, in some cases, the lymph nodes as well. Data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality says their analysis points to a 36 percent increase of both single and double mastectomies...
Learning breast anatomy helps better understanding of disease

Learning breast anatomy helps better understanding of disease

The well-known breast cancer advocacy and research group Susan G. Komen indicates that, according to the most recent data available, 1.7 million new cases of breast cancer occurred among women worldwide in 2012. Western Europe, North America and northern Europe have the highest breast cancer incidences in the world, according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health...
Nationwide EpiPen shortage keeping some kids out of school

Nationwide EpiPen shortage keeping some kids out of school

The nationwide EpiPen shortage is now forcing some children to stay home from school until their medication can be filled, KIRO-TV in Seattle is reporting. Chiquita Morris said her 5-year-old son, Eden, had just started kindergarten at Spanaway Elementary School in Spanaway, Washington, when she was told by school officials that Eden couldn’t come back until he has an EpiPen. “Yes...
Woman says she failed drug test after taking CBD oil

Woman says she failed drug test after taking CBD oil

Cannabidiol is legal in Georgia, but Atlanta's WSB-TV has learned that if you're taking it, you could fail a drug screening. “It is one thing we warn our customers about, there's a possibility. It does have a small amount of THC in there; there is a possibility you could fail it," said Anthony Laborde of Discount Nutrition. Laborde told WSB-TV’s Tom Regan that he is...
Springfield’s Rocking Horse gets $50,000 to help kids impacted by drugs

Springfield’s Rocking Horse gets $50,000 to help kids impacted by drugs

A Springfield medical health center will receive new money to help local kids who have lost a parent to drugs. CVS Health distributed a $50,000 grant to Rocking Horse Community Health Center Friday morning that will be used to help Clark County children who have been impacted the most by the opioid epidemic. The money will also go to help children whose parents are addicted to drugs. “We are...
Are household disinfectants making kids overweight? Study finds possible link

Are household disinfectants making kids overweight? Study finds possible link

Obesity affects nearly 1 in 6 children in the United States, according to new data from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s State of Obesity report. And new findings from the Canadian Medical Association Journal reveal there may be more contributing to that stat than overeating. Overweight children are approximately five times more likely to be obese or overweight as adults, increasing...
Do you think Ohio should put air conditioners in schools? One local lawmaker thinks so

Do you think Ohio should put air conditioners in schools? One local lawmaker thinks so

State Rep. Niraj Antani, R-Miamisburg, has requested an estimate to install air conditioners into every Ohio school, according to a release.  In reaction to Tuesday’s early dismissals across the Miami Valley due to extreme heat, Antani sent a letter to State Superintendent Paolo DeMaria expressing his concern for the lack of air conditioning in schools. “Today, a number of school...
Deadly salmonella outbreak linked to kosher chicken

Deadly salmonella outbreak linked to kosher chicken

Salmonella has sickened 17 people in four states and one person has died, according to the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Eight people reportedly were so sick that they had to be hospitalized.  The illnesses have been linked to kosher chicken, officials said. Several people reported getting sick after eating Empire-brand kosher chicken. Empire is the largest producer...
Why whooping cough is making a comeback

Why whooping cough is making a comeback

After a week with a dry cough, Karen Andes’ son started experiencing middle-of-the-night coughing fits so severe, he couldn’t talk. He returned home from his first trip to the urgent care clinic in mid-July with an inhaler and a five-day course of steroids. The coughing fits didn’t abate, and after a few days, the Decatur, Georgia, teenager jumped out of bed and got his...
Here’s what data say about who is dying from overdoses in Clark County

Here’s what data say about who is dying from overdoses in Clark County

Clark County set a new record while ranking third in the state for drug deaths in 2017 by the Ohio Department of Health, according to preliminary data from the state agency when adjusted for age. The health department found 96 Clark County residents died of an unintentional drug-related overdose in 2017. When adjusted for age, the department gave Clark County a score of 81. Only Montgomery County...
5 things every parent should know about immunization

5 things every parent should know about immunization

Within the first few months of your child's life, your pediatrician will likely start talking to you about immunizations. Even if your house is stocked with hand sanitizer and antibacterial soap, it's important to know what options are out there to keep your kid safe from diseases that could have harmful consequences. With all of the talk out there about the pros and cons of getting...
What age should you stop breastfeeding your baby?

What age should you stop breastfeeding your baby?

It's motherhood 101: Breast is best for your new bundle of joy. However, there are few hard and fast rules on when to wean your little one from breastfeeding. August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month, so it’s the opportune time to take a look at some of the benefits for nursing mothers and their babies.  Breastfeeding comes with advantages for both moms and infants, according to...
5 things every parent should know about immunization

5 things every parent should know about immunization

Within the first few months of your child's life, your pediatrician will likely start talking to you about immunizations. Even if your house is stocked with hand sanitizer and antibacterial soap, it's important to know what options are out there to keep your kid safe from diseases that could have harmful consequences. TheWorld Health Organization defines immunization as the process that makes a person...
Could your child be gifted? Here's what you need to know 

Could your child be gifted? Here's what you need to know 

Just about every parent has heard their child say something that seems advanced for his age. Or seen her show off an impressive new skill and wondered, "Is my child is gifted?" Of course, each child has special talents and interests, but giftedness is usually identified in specific ways. What does it mean to be gifted and what traits could indicate that your child falls into this category?...
Clark County drug deaths are down in 2018, but drug use likely similar

Clark County drug deaths are down in 2018, but drug use likely similar

MORE: Addicts, families share stories at Springfield recovery banquet Fewer drug-related deaths have been recorded in Clark County this year, but health officials and law enforcement warn that doesn’t mean fewer people are using drugs. Narcan and other life-saving measures have played a significant role in reducing deaths, said Wendy Doolittle, Chief Executive Director of McKinley Hall, a drug...
Back-to-school selfies may spread super lice, expert says

Back-to-school selfies may spread super lice, expert says

Parents may want to add super lice remedies to the back-to-school shopping list. A 2013 study in the Journal of Medical Entomology found that in North America, most head lice has evolved into a new, more powerful strain that is immune to traditional lice treatments, hence the name “super lice.” Canada had been experiencing an alarming rise in cases, and there have been multiple outbreaks...
When should my child take those much-anticipated first steps?

When should my child take those much-anticipated first steps?

Your child's first steps are a time of great anticipation and excitement, but you might also wonder if he or she is taking too long to reach this important milestone. Most babies start to take their first steps when they're between 9-12 months old, and most are walking well at around the 14- to 15-month mark, according to BabyCenter. The important part to remember is "most," since like...
More Health Stories