Flesh Eating Bacteria Facts Myths and Precautions

Man contracts flesh-eating bacteria while crabbing, could lose arms, legs

Angel Perez was crabbing at Matt’s Landing near Camden on July 2. Hours after the excursion, his right leg swelled. Then his daughter said that his leg started becoming brown and black and blistered, WPVI reported

They took him to the hospital where doctors said he contracted vibrio, a bacteria commonly known as flesh-eating bacteria, WPVI reported.

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Perez’s daughter said that the infection is now in his blood and he’s in critical condition, NJ.com reported.

Doctors are treating him with antibiotics and have to wait until he responds to the treatment before they consider amputating at least three, if not all four, limbs, NJ.com reported.

He is able to breathe on his own and family can communicate with Perez. 

Two other friends of the family also frequent the landing and have also been experiencing swelling. One had painful swelling in a leg. Another has a swelling on an elbow, NJ.com reported

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that variations of vibrio can be found in brackish or salt water. Open wounds can cause the bacteria to enter the body. Most infections, 80 percent of them, happen between May and October when water is warm.

Those who contract vibrio vulnificus infections can get so sick that they need intensive care and even amputation of limbs. One in four people die, some succumbing to the infection within a day or two of getting sick, according to the CDC.

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