Coronavirus: Stimulus checks overwhelm bank, credit union websites

STAFF/BONNIE MEIBERS

Combined ShapeCaption
STAFF/BONNIE MEIBERS

Banks and credit unions on Wednesday saw a surge in web traffic as people checked on whether their checks from the federal stimulus plan were deposited.

The Dayton Daily News received numerous complaints from people saying they could not check their online accounts.

Fifth Third Bank and PNC Bank reported temporary issues with some of their apps and phone lines.

MORE: Thousands of Dayton-area people will get stimulus payment this week

“We are working as quickly as possible to restore these services for affected customers. We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience,” said spokeswoman Laura Trujillo on Wednesday afternoon.

Day Air Credit Union also had a surge in phone calls and web traffic, though as of Wednesday afternoon was back up online, after reallocating some of its server capacity.

Joe Eckley, director of marketing, Day Air Credit Union, said the credit union worked to give its members access a few days earlier to their stimulus chekcs and also received a record level of call volume from people asking about their stimulus checks.

“We’re back up and running as of right now,” he said.

PNC Bank said in a statement that, like other banks, customers experienced intermittent mobile and care center access today.

“This was the result of an unprecedented volume of customers using these channels to check their accounts for Economic Impact Payments and other forms of financial hardship relief. Our technical teams were engaged and we appreciate our customers’ patience as we worked as quickly as possible to address the issue,” said spokeswoman Marcey Zwiebel.

The IRS and U.S. Department of the Treasury today launched a new “Get My Payment” web tool, at a time when tens of millions of Americans are getting a “stimulus” check deposited into their accounts.

The free app allows taxpayers who filed 2018 or 2019 federal tax returns but did not provide their banking information to the IRS to provide the agency with direct deposit information.Submitting that info will allow citizens to get the economic impact payments, also called "stimulus" payments, directly put into their bank accounts, instead of having to wait for a paper check in the mail. The free app can be found here (though it has also been experiencing a lag from high web traffic.)

About the Author