A famous rock band got its name from this Springfield company, which led the world in a road-building product

Before 1889, no road rollers were made in the United States. The O.S. Kelly Company had been building steam traction engines to pull rollers imported from England, but O.S. Kelly decided it was time to go into the business. The Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Company launched its first line in 1902 and by 1910 was the largest producer of road rollers in the world. They merged with their biggest rival, Buffalo Steam Roller in 1913 to become Buffalo-Springfield (inspiring the name of the 1960s band) and eventually becoming Koehring, then BOMAG, U.S.A. This 1921 Buffalo-Springfield Roller is on display at the Heritage Center. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLARK COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
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Before 1889, no road rollers were made in the United States. The O.S. Kelly Company had been building steam traction engines to pull rollers imported from England, but O.S. Kelly decided it was time to go into the business. The Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Company launched its first line in 1902 and by 1910 was the largest producer of road rollers in the world. They merged with their biggest rival, Buffalo Steam Roller in 1913 to become Buffalo-Springfield (inspiring the name of the 1960s band) and eventually becoming Koehring, then BOMAG, U.S.A. This 1921 Buffalo-Springfield Roller is on display at the Heritage Center. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLARK COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Credit: HANDOUT

Credit: HANDOUT

Before 1889, no road rollers were made in the United States.

The O.S. Kelly Company had been building steam traction engines to pull rollers imported from England, but O.S. Kelly decided it was time to go into the business.

READ MORE: 5 fascinating things to know about Clark County’s history as it celebrates its bicentennial

The Kelly-Springfield Road Roller Company launched its first line in 1902 and by 1910 was the largest producer of road rollers in the world. They merged with their biggest rival, Buffalo Steam Roller in 1913 to become Buffalo-Springfield (inspiring the name of the 1960s band) and eventually becoming Koehring, then BOMAG, U.S.A.

The 1921 Buffalo-Springfield Roller pictured above is on display at the Heritage Center.