5 simple ways to support your community during the coronavirus pandemic

Fairmont student Gabe Davis gives a ‘thumbs up’ as he donates blood during the high school’s March Blood Drive. CONTRIBUTED

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Fairmont student Gabe Davis gives a ‘thumbs up’ as he donates blood during the high school’s March Blood Drive. CONTRIBUTED

Coming together as a community was one of the silver linings to emerge from Dayton’s trials and tribulations in 2019. From the massive tornado recovery efforts to the outpouring of generosity after the mass shooting, we have had a lot of practice uniting to help one another.

Now that we face the collective economic, medical and social fallout from the coronavirus pandemic, there are several ways you can help support the Dayton community, and each other, while we’re kept apart.

>> Read more: 100+ Daytonians pass the Peeps (and toilet paper) in hilarious video

🏠 Actually stay home

You've heard it 1,000 times, but seriously, please stay home. This isn't the same as a snow day. Social distancing means no more play dates, dinner parties, board games with friends, and the like. Even if you feel healthy, according to the Ohio Department of Health, you can be contagious without any symptoms for up to 14 days. 

Although being cooped up isn’t fun, think of it as an amazing act of solidarity to help protect your community. If we all comply, we’re giving our beloved health care workers a fighting chance to get through this without being overwhelmed.

>> Read more: Support health care workers during coronavirus pandemic

💉Give blood

One good reason to leave the house is to give blood. The Community Blood Center has sent out urgent reminders to the public that blood donors are exempt from the Ohio Department of Health Stay at Home Order.

The CBC is urging donors to make an appointment to donate to maintain a safe environment at blood drives. Spacing donors through appointments maintains social distancing by reducing wait time and congregating. Make an appointment online at www.DonorTime.com or call (937) 461-3220.

>> Read more: How you can take part in the first virtual Dayton Heart Ball

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The Dayton Ballet's "Innovations" performance was cancelled this month due to the coronavirus.

The Dayton Ballet's "Innovations" performance was cancelled this month due to the coronavirus.

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The Dayton Ballet's "Innovations" performance was cancelled this month due to the coronavirus.

🎫 Don’t get refunds

Obviously a lot of events have had to be canceled, including nonprofit fundraisers, concerts, and arts performances. Between salaries, costumes and sets, there are a considerable amount of sunken costs that already went into creating those performances. Those organizations were dependent upon recouping those costs with income from ticket sales.

If you already purchased a ticket, and the event is not being rescheduled, consider not asking for a refund. It will go a long way to ensuring that your favorite organization or performer can afford to come back next season.

>> Read more: Dayton ballet dancers getting creative during COVID-19 pandemic

💲 Donate to The Dayton Foundation’s COVID-19 Response Fund

Making a general donation to The Dayton Foundation and the United Way’s COVID-19 Response Fund is a wonderful way to give back to the Dayton community at large. Grants will be awarded to vetted community-based and 501(c)(3) charitable organizations that are focused on: immediate, basic human needs; mental health services; and addressing the economic impact on individuals from reduced or lost work due to the outbreak.

The Dayton Foundation is waiving all administrative fees and is paying all credit card processing fees so that 100 percent of donations will be used to assist others. Contributions to the fund may be made online at www.daytonfoundation.org/ccgift.html, or by mailing a check to The Dayton Foundation, 1401 S. Main Street, Suite 100, Dayton, OH 45409. "COVID-19 Response Fund" or "Fund #1652" should be designated on the check or in the credit card form's fund name field.

>> Read more: Dayton Strong: Coronavirus fund set up to help area nonprofits during response

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💻 Set up technology for seniors

Do you have an elderly neighbor, friend or family member who is living alone and feeling isolated? Setting them up with technology can be surprisingly impactful, and you can even do it remotely.

If they have a smartphone, it should be fairly simple to walk them through how to accept a Facetime call. If they only have computer access, you can email a Zoom or Skype link and see if they can connect that way. If they’re already in your small circle of trusted contacts, consider taking a moment to set up a webcam and teach them how to use it.

If they don’t have a smartphone or computer, forget the technology and simply make a call or write a letter. However you manage it, connecting with isolated seniors will help maintain their mental and emotional health during this quarantine.

>> Read more: Want help? Need help? Where to find and give help related to the coronavirus.

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