You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and interactive features. Starting at just 99c for 8 weeks.

X

Welcome to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Your source for Clark and Champaign counties’ hometown news. All readers have free access to a limited number of stories every month.

If you are a News-Sun subscriber, please take a moment to login for unlimited access.

Yellow Springs standoff investigation to wrap up soon


An internal law enforcement investigation into the death of a Yellow Springs man killed during a police standoff is expected conclude soon, said Greene County Sheriff Gene Fischer.

The investigation is ongoing six months after Fischer asked Montgomery County investigators to determine whether the sheriff office’s policies and procedures were followed on July 30 — the night 80 law enforcement officers responded to a Yellow Springs police officer’s call for help and 42-year-old Paul E. Schenck was killed.

Major Eric Spicer and Deputy James “Jimmie” Hughes fired their weapons during the police standoff and were placed on paid administrative leave, according to the sheriff’s office.

“From that night there were concerns that some of our policies had been violated by the major and therefore we asked for an outside investigation,” Fischer said.

During a November news conference, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine said Spicer led the law enforcement officers to the wrong home located three houses south of Schenck’s residence.

“Unaware that they were at the incorrect location, the Emergency Action Team remained there for approximately two hours,” DeWine said.

DeWine said Spicer attempted to enter the wrong house causing a fearful resident to dial 9-1-1.

The week after the Schenck’s death, Chief Deputy Michael Brown filed an internal complaint against Spicer for “neglect of duty,” according to documents obtained by the Dayton Daily News.

Spicer said it is frustrating to go through the process, but he can understand why the investigation has taken so long.

“I look forward to its conclusion and getting back to work for the people of Greene County,” Spicer said.

Spicer, who has worked for the sheriff’s office for almost a decade, is a law enforcement division commander. His salary and benefits totaled $87,387 last year, according to county payroll records.

“I think it’s important that they (investigators) do a diligent job so they can take all these different perspectives and pick apart what’s rumor and what’s real and put everything through the appropriate filter and hopefully be left with an accurate accounting so we can all learn from it and adjust where necessary and get back to serving Greene County citizens,” Spicer said.

In November, an Ohio Attorney General Bureau of Criminal Investigation concluded and found Hughes fired the shot that killed Schenck. About a month later, a grand jury determined the use of force used by police was necessary and Hughes was not criminally charged.

Hughes returned to work on Oct. 9, according to the sheriff’s office, however he was placed on paid administrative leave again on Nov. 16 for medical reasons. After the grand jury hearing, Hughes returned to work on Jan. 2.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in News

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg surprises Ohio family, drops in for dinner
Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg surprises Ohio family, drops in for dinner

Guess who’s coming to dinner? Mark Zuckerberg! In their wildest dreams, an Ohio family couldn’t imagine hosting dinner for one of the wealthiest people in the world, and talking about politics and an African charity they support with the Facebook founder and CEO, but that’s exactly what happened. Members of the Moore family...
I-75 shut down for crash, tanker fire in Dayton; Police suspect fatality
I-75 shut down for crash, tanker fire in Dayton; Police suspect fatality

The Ohio Department of Transportation has detours suggested to avoid the shutdown on Interstate 75 in Dayton. For northbound traffic, motorists can use Interstate 675 as a detour, then take Interstate 70 to get back on Interstate 75 in Vandalia. For those traveling south, motorists should take I-75 to I-70 East to I-675 South. It’s important...
Home Depot data leak compromises customers’ private info again
Home Depot data leak compromises customers’ private info again

A spread sheet listing about 8,000 customers, along with their transaction and a range of personal information, was posted for an unknown amount of time, on a Home Depot web site. No financial data was part of the list, which did not compare with the 2014 data breach in which hackers installed software that provided them with personal and financial...
Hip-hop music has fewer drug references than any other genre, but still dominates
Hip-hop music has fewer drug references than any other genre, but still dominates

Think Migos and other rap artists mention molly and marijuana the most in their songs? Think again, because hip-hop has the least number of drug references compared to any other musical genre, according to a recent study.  Using data from Songmeanings API, Addictions.com analyzed eight music categories to determine which style’s lyrics mentioned...
Female dragonflies play dead to avoid amorous males
Female dragonflies play dead to avoid amorous males

Female dragonflies are one of only a few animal species that play dead to avoid mating or death, falling out of the sky and remaining motionless until the amorous male dragonfly leaves. That’s the conclusion of a new study in the journal Ecology by University of Zurich zoologist Rassim Khelifa, Newsweek reported. Khelifa, who documented the behavior...
More Stories