You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and interactive features. Starting at just 99c for 8 weeks.

X

Welcome to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Your source for Clark and Champaign counties’ hometown news. All readers have free access to a limited number of stories every month.

If you are a News-Sun subscriber, please take a moment to login for unlimited access.

Kasich maintains support in new poll


Ohio Gov. John Kasich is maintaining his new-found popularity with Ohio voters, according to a new poll.

A Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday found that 52 percent of voters approve of the job Kasich is doing as Ohio’s governor, and gave him a comfortable advantage against either of his two likely Democratic challengers in 2014.

In the last Quinnipiac poll, released Feb. 28., Kasich enjoyed an all-time high approval rating of 53 percent. The 1 percent dip is within the newest poll’s 2.9 percent margin of error, and is not statistically significant.

“In a state where self-described Democrats outnumber Republicans 35 - 27 percent, Kasich seems to be in reasonably good shape as he looks ahead to the 2014 gubernatorial election,” said Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. “The fact that he leads his two potential Democratic opponents by 20 and 17 points respectively among the key independent voting bloc is a good indication that he starts the campaign with the voting public seeing him positively.”

Kasich’s approval rating hovered in the 30s during much of the beginning of his term in 2011. Last December, he got his first overall thumbs-up from voters with a 42 percent approval rating.

A particularly encouraging sign for Kasich is 49 percent of voters approve of how he is handling the economy, Brown said. Regardless of what happens in Columbus, voters ultimately decide whether to support a governor largely if they feel their lives are getting better, he said.

“Ohio’s improving economy, and voters’ perceptions that the economy is doing better than the rest of the country, is a huge boost to him,” he said.

Meanwhile, the poll shows two possible Democratic challengers — Cuyahoga County Executive Ed FitzGerald and former Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray — have their work cut out for them.

Kasich led FitzGerald 46-37 percent, and Cordray 45-38 percent. FitzGerald has filed the necessary paperwork to run for governor but hasn’t yet officially declared his candidacy. Cordray is the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which forbids him from running for office, but is considered a possible gubernatorial candidate if Republicans in Washington, D.C., block his nomination.

The poll shows that there is a gender gap in Kasich’s support. Among men, Kasich enjoys a 51-32 percent lead over FitzGerald, while women are evenly split 41-41 percent. Against Cordray, Kasich leads 52-34 percent among men, while Cordray leads Kasich among women 43-39 percent.

Any support for FitzGerald and Cordray against Kasich came despite the vast majority of voters not knowing who they are. For Cordray, 66 percent of voters said they don’t know enough about him to form an opinion. For Fitzgerald, 76 percent don’t know enough.

From April 10 - 15, Quinnipiac University surveyed 1,138 registered voters. To conduct the poll, live interviewers called both land lines and cell phones.

Tell us what you think of Gov. Kasich’s performance on at www.Facebook.com/daytondailynews.

Today, Quinnipiac will release results of a poll looking at gun laws and gay marriage. We’ll have results as soon as they are released on our website and in Saturday’s newspaper.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Politics

Dayton leaders in D.C. to push local issues
Dayton leaders in D.C. to push local issues

Two former Ohio congressmen Tuesday expressed grave concern about President Donald Trump’s handling of North Korea, saying they worry that a diplomatic misstep could provoke North Korea to attack South Korea. Speaking before the Dayton Development Coalition Tuesday, former Reps. David Hobson, a Springfield Republican and Tony Hall, a Dayton Democrat...
Ohio House budget proposal would eliminate Municipal Clerk’s office
Ohio House budget proposal would eliminate Municipal Clerk’s office

An item in the Ohio House of Representatives biennial budget proposal could consolidate the clerk of courts offices in Clark County, if approved. The proposal would eliminate the office of the Municipal Clerk of Courts in Clark County and roll its duties into the Clark County Clerk of Courts Office, according to House Bill 49, which was released Tuesday...
Ohio House wants more money to fight opiates; ditches Kasich tax plan
Ohio House wants more money to fight opiates; ditches Kasich tax plan

Ohio House Republicans on Tuesday announced they’re ditching Gov. John Kasich’s plans for tax reforms in the state budget bill and said they’re pouring an extra $170.6 million into fighting the opiate addiction crisis. The governor called for income tax cuts and hikes in taxes on tobacco, vaping, sales and oil and gas extraction....
Springfield K-9 unit responds to hundreds of calls annually
Springfield K-9 unit responds to hundreds of calls annually

The Springfield Police Division’s K-9 unit responds to hundreds of calls annually, removing guns and drugs from the streets. The K-9 unit includes Officer Kevin Hoying and his dog, Spike, as well as Officer Deric Nichols and his dog, Gery. The officers spoke about their unit at the Springfield Rotary Meeting at the Clark State Community College...
Kucinich goes after charter schools in Dayton-area visit
Kucinich goes after charter schools in Dayton-area visit

Dennis Kucinich, a potential candidate for governor and former Ohio congressman, spoke Monday night in Washington Township, where he criticized charter schools as a drain on public funding and public schools. Kucinich called charter schools a “multi-billion dollar boondoogle” that forces Ohioans to subsidize private school education with...
More Stories