You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and interactive features. Starting at just 99c for 8 weeks.

X

Welcome to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Your source for Clark and Champaign counties’ hometown news. All readers have free access to a limited number of stories every month.

If you are a News-Sun subscriber, please take a moment to login for unlimited access.

Only 28 percent of Ohio high school grads are college-ready


Ohio high school students in the class of 2012 beat the national average score on the ACT, but the state said there is still work to do to prepare students for college and their careers.

Just 28 percent of Ohio’s graduates in 2012 were ready for college in every subject on the standardized test, according to new data released Wednesday.

The results also show Ohio’s minorities are less prepared: Just 4 percent of black students and 18 percent of Hispanic students were college-ready in English, math, reading and science, compared to 32 percent of white students.

Overall, Ohioans scored an average 21.8 out of a possible 36 composite score for the third year in a row — slightly better than the 21.1 national average.

“We recognize that there is a lot of improvement we need to make here in the state of Ohio,” said John Charlton, spokesman for the Ohio Department of Education. “We’re not doing a good job of educating our students and preparing them for the future.”

The testing company claimed that the latest results show that most of the nation’s high school graduates are “ill-prepared for success at the next level.” But local colleges said they do not admit or deny students based on ACT scores alone. Standardized test scores are one factor considered by many schools, along with essays, references, high school grade-point averages and activities.

“In an evaluation of a student who applies, the high school course selection and the grades in those courses tell us more about that student than a standardized test score,” said Robert Durkle, assistant vice president for enrollment management at the University of Dayton.

And while the ACT company said scores can predict what grade a student might get in a college course, Ann Larson, director of admission at Miami University, said test scores must be put into context with other information.

“We never say if you have a great test score you’re going to do well at a university,” she said.

Wittenberg University allows students to opt out of providing scores from the ACT or SAT.

“Since we are a school that talks about development of the whole person, what you do in one day on a standardize test doesn’t reflect who you are as a whole person,” said Karen Hunt, executive director of admission at Wittenberg University.

At Wright State University, a score of at least 18 on the ACT can help students meet admission requirements, said Cathy Davis, assistant vice president of undergraduate admissions.

“It helps give us another gauge of a student’s academic ability,” she said.

Ohio shied away from the ACT as its uniform requirement and instead chose to have all high school sophomores take the PSAT starting in 2015, Charlton said. Still, ACT scores can be used to qualify for merit scholarships at most universities.

Durkle said test scores can be used to ensure students are placed in the proper classes or given the help they need to succeed.

Kim Fish, who coordinates Springfield City School’s college readiness activities, said the test results can be useful to individual students to ensure they are challenging themselves.

“The kids that are coming out of high school today … they are going to be competing with kids from across the United States and the most driven kids from across the world,” Fish said. “The earlier they can get a personal look at how they stack up, when they can still take classes and work a little harder … the better.”



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in News

Animal lovers band together to give cat a full nine lives after fire
Animal lovers band together to give cat a full nine lives after fire

Local animal lovers are banding together to help save a cat rescued from a north Tulsa fire. Officials say three cats and a dog died in the fire near North Xenophon Avenue and West Seminole Street Sunday night. Firefighters say that when they pulled Fuego the cat out of the fire, he wasn’t breathing either. They put an oxygen mask on Fuego and...
Trump supporters, protesters brawl using MAGA flag, pepper spray after rally turns violent
Trump supporters, protesters brawl using MAGA flag, pepper spray after rally turns violent

It was hardly just another laid-back day at the beach Saturday in Southern California. Violence broke out in Huntington Beach when people marching in support of President Donald Trump and protesters got into some heavy fisticuffs. Marchers came out to take part in a Make America Great Again rally, and things got a bit wild when a protester allegedly...
Broadway stars lend voices to save arts funding with Beatles classic
Broadway stars lend voices to save arts funding with Beatles classic

Stars of the Great White Way put their voices together to help save arts funding endangered by President Donald Trump’s proposed budget. Cast members from hit shows like “Hamilton,” “Rent,” “Cats,” and “Les Miserables” belted out a gospel-like version of the Beatles hit “With a Little...
Brady tells Kraft he's willing to play six or seven more years
Brady tells Kraft he's willing to play six or seven more years

Patriots Chairman and CEO Robert Kraft shared a part of his recent conversation with Tom Brady Monday during the owner's meetings in Phoenix.  "As recently as two, three days ago, he assured me he'd be willing to play six, seven more years at the level he performed," said Kraft. "There's no one that would be happier than I...
Professor asks students to write 9/11 essay from terrorists' perspective, sparking outrage
Professor asks students to write 9/11 essay from terrorists' perspective, sparking outrage

An international studies course assignment at Iowa State University asking students to explore 9/11 and al-Qaida’s understanding of it is eliciting a strong reaction on social media. Although the assignment says in its description that the exercise is not about “agree[ing] with the terrorists” but about “consider[ing] completely...
More Stories