You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and interactive features. Starting at just 99c for 8 weeks.

X

Welcome to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Your source for Clark and Champaign counties’ hometown news. All readers have free access to a limited number of stories every month.

If you are a News-Sun subscriber, please take a moment to login for unlimited access.

Springfield school board discusses calamity days


Whether to use more calamity days was one of the topics of discussion for the Springfield City Schools board on Thursday night.

The city district has used six days so far this winter season. The limit set by the state is five.

Linda Shaffer, a former board member and current director of Big Brothers and Big Sisters, attended the meeting because she's interested in educating youth.

She said she didn't have to deal with calamity days when she was on the board, but said her general feeling about calamity days is that "districts need to have flexibility to keep their kids safe.

"I don't think many districts lightly call a calamity day," she said. "They do it because... there's a calamity."

The board took no action, but only wanted to discuss what to do if confronted with deciding whether to use another day out of class as schools are trying to prep students for the Ohio Achievement Assessments.

The OAAs are given for grades 3 through 8 and measure reading, math, science, social studies and writing.

Thursday night's meeting came one day after debate over teacher pay and classroom time caused the Ohio House of Representatives to delay a vote to extend the number of calamity days for schools.

Members plan to take another week to continue to work on the number of days in the proposal and review its costs, a House member said Wednesday.

Snow and frigid temperatures have led many districts across Ohio to exhaust their five allowable calamity days. Some -- including Greenon Local, Northeastern and Southeastern in Clark County -- have canceled classes for 10 or more days.

Former Gov. Ted Strickland reduced the number of calamity days to three from five in an effort to provide more classroom time without additional personnel costs.

Gov. John Kasich, soon after he took office, convinced lawmakers to bump the number back to five. He has been among those advocating adding extra snow days on a one-time basis this year.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Community News

Security experts warn about possible violence at inauguration
Security experts warn about possible violence at inauguration

As the nation's security agencies gear up for President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration on Friday, some experts in the field are warning of the potential for volatility. >> Read more trending stories  "Unlike previous inaugurations in presidential history, this is predicted to be the most volatile," said Ross Bulla, a security...
Dr. Bernice King: ‘My father would meet with Trump’
Dr. Bernice King: ‘My father would meet with Trump’

As a war of words plays out between President-elect Donald Trump and Georgia congressman and civil rights icon John Lewis, one is left to wonder what MLK Jr. would have done in the wake of the 2016 election. >> Read more trending stories  Two days before her famous father's birthday, the daughter of the civil rights icon answered that question...
Dems call for county commissioner in Georgia to resign after John Lewis comments
Dems call for county commissioner in Georgia to resign after John Lewis comments

Gwinnett County Commissioner Tommy Hunter waded into controversial territory over the weekend when he wrote a Facebook post calling U.S. Rep. John Lewis -- a civil rights legend already locked in a war of words with President-elect Donald Trump -- a “racist pig.” The reaction to Hunter, a Republican, taking on Lewis a few days before...
Another musical act drops out of Trump inauguration lineup
Another musical act drops out of Trump inauguration lineup

It was announced last week that the B Street Band, a Bruce Springsteen cover band, was going to perform at the Garden State Inaugural Gala to ring in the Trump-Pence administration with song. Not anymore. >> Read more trending stories  The band, which performed after two election wins by outgoing President Obama, told 'Entertainment...
Civil rights activist urges for understanding at Wittenberg event

A longtime civil rights activist urged students and community members to fight for policies and principles they believe in, but stressed they should avoid personal attacks on those with whom they disagree. Dorothy Tillman, a civil rights activist and a former Chicago alderman, was the guest speaker for Wittenberg University’s annual Martin Luther...
More Stories