Pools prepare to open, test water often


Local public pools are preparing to open for the Memorial Day weekend, including painting, cleaning, filling the pools and most importantly — testing the water.

A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that 58 percent of pools have tested positive for E.coli bacteria.

Public pools are required to test the water’s pH and chlorine to make sure the levels are the most effective for killing germs, said Dan Chatfield, director of environmental health at the Clark County Combined Health District.

A state requirement calls for sampling every two hours and local pool officials say they test the water often.

“We test every two hours. If it’s sunny, more than that,” said Wendy Russel of the South Charleston pool.

National Trail Parks and Recreation District’s Splash Zone Family Aquatic Center uses a machine that constantly monitors the pool, as well as manually testing the water every four hours. The levels are monitored by a computerized system that automatically adjusts the water as needed.

Urbana’s local pool tests the water often throughout the day using a chemical testing kit. Along with testing, the water is vacuumed twice a week, according to Cheryl Wade, pool manager.

Among staff members constantly testing the water, the Clark County Combined Health District is required to sample the water at least twice a year.

“Our goal is to get there monthly,” Chatfield said.

When inspecting, the health department brings its own testing kit and checks records of work done. An annual meeting is also held with pool operators to discuss safety procedures.

Aside from testing, swimmers can help prevent the spread of bacteria and diseases.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s website, swimmers should shower with soap prior to swimming and take children to the restroom every hour. The CDC also suggests that a person not swim for two weeks if diarrhea is a problem.



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Community News

Deputy's quick action saves K-9 partner
Deputy's quick action saves K-9 partner

Quick action by a Martin County deputy likely saved the life of his partner, a 5-year-old K-9 officer named Kaspar, according to the sheriff's office. When Deputy Ron Manganiello noticed that Kaspar was suffering from serious internal distress today, he rushed the dog to a veterinarian. Kaspar underwent immediate surgery, which revealed a large tumor...
How to photograph the solar eclipse with your smartphone
How to photograph the solar eclipse with your smartphone

Many who hope to capture the eclipse Monday using their professional digital cameras have been warned to protect their camera lenses with proper solar filters. But what about smartphones? Here are some general guidelines for taking successful smartphone photos of the solar eclipse. Use a tripod or rest your smartphone on a stable surface to avoid...
NFL coach says he will not stop his players from protesting national anthem
NFL coach says he will not stop his players from protesting national anthem

New York Jets coach Todd Bowles will not stand in the way of any of his players protesting during the national anthem. No Jets players have indicated that they would opt to not stand during the performance of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” as then-San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick did last season. But Bowles made it clear that those...
Shannen Doherty shares heartfelt message about doctor who saved her life
Shannen Doherty shares heartfelt message about doctor who saved her life

Shannen Doherty continues to be an inspiration to us all as she looks on the bright side of her cancer battle. This week, the actress took to Instagram to point out one good thing that came out of her breast cancer diagnosis: meeting Dr. Lawrence Piro. Doherty shared a touching message about the man she never would have met if she hadn’t developed...
Franklin Twp., city still not talking about Confederate monument’s fate
Franklin Twp., city still not talking about Confederate monument’s fate

Local officials refused to talk Friday about the status — or even the current whereabouts — of the Confederate monument that was removed by Franklin city workers. The plaque dedicated to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and placed on a stone at Dixie Highway and Hamilton Middletown Road in Franklin was removed under cover of night. MORE:...
More Stories