Dayton Literary Peace Prize finalists named


The Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation, which celebrates “the power of literature to promote peace,” has announced its list of finalists for 2013.

Prizes will be given for both fiction and nonfiction and winners will be honored on Nov. 3 at a Dayton ceremony hosted by journalist Nick Clooney.

This year’s finalists “examine conflict and the need for tolerance across the spectrum of relationships,” according to Foundation chair Sharon Rab. She said each of the works “reminds us that our lives are filled with moral dilemmas every day.”

A winner and runner-up in fiction and nonfiction will be selected. Winners receive a $10,000 honorarium and runners-up receive $1,000. Rab said the number of nominations has grown every year as has the number of nominations from international publishing houses. The committee received 72 nominations this year.

The 2013 Dayton Literary Peace Prize fiction finalists are: “The Round House” by Louise Erdrich; “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” by Ben Fountain; “The Orphan Master’s Son” by Adam Johnson; “The Life of Objects” by Susanna Moore; “The Coldest Night” by Robert Olmstead; and “The Yellow Birds” by Kevin Powers.

The 2013 nonfiction finalists are:“Behind the Beautiful Forevers” by Katherine Boo; “Pax Ethnica” by Karl Meyer and Shareen Brysac; “Burying the Typewriter” by Carmen Bugan; “Escape from Camp 14” by Blaine Harden; “Devil in the Grove” by Gilbert King; and “Far From the Tree” by Andrew Solomon.

The only international literary peace prize awarded in the United States, the Dayton prize was inspired by the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended the war in Bosnia. The Foundation has previously announced that author and environmental activist Wendell Berry will receive the 2013 Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, named in honor of the U.S. diplomat.

For more information on the authors and books under consideration, see Sunday’s Dayton Daily News Life & Arts.


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