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‘Post-apocalyptic’ neighborhoods: Thousands foreclosed this year


Mere miles from the city’s center, one Dayton neighborhood looks like the setting of a post-apocalyptic horror film.

Windows are boarded up or shattered, yards are overgrown and, on the surface at least, hope seems in short supply.

Read: City remains knee-deep in more than 7,000 abandoned properties

But this neighborhood is not the only one in the Miami Valley rocked by the foreclosures still sending thousands into despair.

As WHIO-TV investigative reporter Becky Grimes will tell you today at 5 on NewsCenter 7, homeowners around the Miami Valley have been affected and are still being affected by foreclosure.

The situation is improving, but Ohio has the third highest foreclosure rate in the U.S.

Is the crisis over? Becky says the answer depends on where you stand.

Below is an insider’s look at her story airing on NewsCenter 7.

Amelia: What has happened to neighborhoods hit hardest by the foreclosure crisis?

Becky: In the Santa Clara neighborhood in Dayton, people are living among empty properties with boarded up windows and doors. They don’t feel safe. The scenery is not as painful to look at in Kettering or Huber Heights, but a worry for neighbors just the same. No one likes vacant or neglected property. They also worry about what will happen to the house once it sells? They want the buyer to occupy the house.

Amelia: Have things gotten better or worse, how?

Becky: Actually, things are better in Montgomery County. For the first time in many years, there will be under 3,000 foreclosure filings this year.

Amelia: What did you do to get this story?

Becky: I started with the numbers, of course, and then I went to the neighborhoods most affected by homeowners who have abandoned their properties. In some cases, they simply lost their jobs. You get this type of story simply by talking to people.

Amelia: Why is this something that should concern area residents?

Becky: Not only can foreclosures affect property values, but they can break down the spirit of a neighborhood and you will see how that happens in our story airing today on NewsCenter 7 beginning at 5 p.m.


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