Boston Marathon: Local runners 'not afraid' to race


A year after a pair of terrorist bombs killed three people and injured hundreds of others during the Boston Marathon, several Miami Valley runners say they are looking forward to this year's race.

"We're going to show people we're not afraid," said Michael Willets of New Carlisle, who plans to travel to Boston with his family on Saturday, and will run in this year's race.

The marathon is scheduled for Monday morning. More than 36,000 people, including 50 from the Miami Valley, are expected to participate.

Last year's Boston Marathon was disrupted by two bombs, allegedly placed at the finish line by brothers Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 20. The elder brother died during a shootout with police while Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is awaiting trial, possibly facing the death penalty.

Willets last ran the historic race in 2012, and he said communication has been notably different this year compared to previous years.

"We know security is going to be very tight," he said. "Almost every other day we are getting emails from organizers."

He contrasted that to getting correspondences about once per month in previous years.

When Willets heard about the 2013 bombings he felt "violated."

"That's hallowed ground for runners," he said, referring to the 118-year-old race. "That was ours."

Security experts say participants and spectators likely won't notice the increased security measures.

"The event itself won't be different for the runners," former FBI Special Agent Tim Shaw said. "There will be a lot of security in places that people won't see."

Authorities may not be able to stop every attack, but they will remain diligent, he said.

"If someone wants to blow themselves up, you're not going to stop that," Shaw said. "But you can limit their opportunities and you can limit the damage. That's what's being done."

The chaotic images of that attack shocked Beavercreek resident Brandon Hough, who will also run in this year's race.

"When it happened, I remember I immediately went out for a run and I was just angry," Hough said. "Running is such a peaceful sport and brings so much happiness to people."


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in News

USS John S. McCain collision: Commander of Navy's 7th Fleet to be relieved of duty, officials say
USS John S. McCain collision: Commander of Navy's 7th Fleet to be relieved of duty, officials say

The commander of the U.S. Navy's 7th Fleet will be relieved of duty following the USS John S. McCain collision and other recent ship accidents, officials told The Associated Press.
Katy Perry addresses rumors she and ex Orlando Bloom rekindling their romance
Katy Perry addresses rumors she and ex Orlando Bloom rekindling their romance

While speaking with “The Morning Mashup,” singer Katy Perry made it clear that she doesn’t want to define her relationship with ex Orlando Bloom after fans spotted them enjoying a recent night out together. “Well, you know, I think people are in and out of your life. It’s nice to keep people you love around you...
Texas mother upset, says 4-year-old son could not attend school because of long hair
Texas mother upset, says 4-year-old son could not attend school because of long hair

A mother in the Houston, Texas, area is upset after she says her 4-year-old son was not allowed to go to school because of his long hair. Jessica Oates told Inside Edition on Tuesday that Barbers Hill Kindergarten Center in Mont Belvieu, Texas, would not let her son, Jabez, in school because of his hair. “When I went to enroll my child...
Wittenberg president: School must accept change, seek progress
Wittenberg president: School must accept change, seek progress

The new president of Wittenberg University spoke to faculty and students and welcomed them back to campus during convocation Tuesday. Mike Frandsen, who started as the liberal arts college’s 15th president on July 1, said he still believes liberal arts is important to higher education. “I believe what we do in liberal arts education is...
Couple to receive $3.4 million in ‘satanic day care’ case
Couple to receive $3.4 million in ‘satanic day care’ case

Dan and Fran Keller, who spent more than 21 years in prison after they were accused of sexually abusing children during satanic rituals at their South Austin day care, will receive $3.4 million from a state fund for those wrongly convicted of crimes. Shortly after receiving the news Tuesday, an ecstatic Fran Keller said they will no longer have to...
More Stories