What is clickjacking? How to avoid falling prey


Today, three quarters of every household has a computer. Computer usage in the home has skyrocketed to more than 53 percent in the last 20 years. Due to this increase, scam artists are getting more high-tech every day. Your Better Business Bureau warns computers users to beware of clickjacking.

Clickjacking occurs when a scam artist hides a scam on a webpage that seems safe. Scammers hide links and other content on the page by using an invisible layer. The victim thinks he or she is clicking on a harmless link on the page, but is really clicking on the invisible layer and activating the scam.

For example, you receive an e-mail directing you to a website. The e-mail claims a major store chain is giving away an item and directs you to a Web site. To the everyday website user, the website looks normal. You proceed to complete the entry form and click submit. But, the scammer has placed an invisible link on the submit button so your action activates the scammer’s code, which can do anything from place an order for something on Amazon to change your computer’s settings to enabling something on your computer like a microphone or camera.

Your BBB offers advice to avoid clickjacking:

• Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is — stay away.

• Avoid websites luring you to look at sensational videos (Click here to see shocking video!) or offers to give away a dream vacation.

• Update your web browser. The newest versions have security updates to warn you of suspicious websites.

• Be sure to log out of websites. Many clickjacking scams take advantage of a computer user’s habit of staying logged into sites. This makes it easier for scammers to purchase something in your name.

• Don’t believe everything you see. A scammer can steal logos, colors and headers from established businesses’ websites to fool you.

• Ask questions. Don’t be afraid to dig deeper if something looks out of place.

For more advice on scams and fighting fraud, visit www.bbb.org or call (937) 222-5825 or (800) 776-5301.


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