Tips, warning signs for frostbite, hypothermia

Updated Jan 02, 2018

The National Weather Service is offering warning signs and tips to deal with frostbite and hypothermia.

Those who need to warm up are encouraged to use their armpits, a warm companion, warm drinks and warm clothes. Those who believe they may have frostbite are encouraged to get indoors, get in a warm, but not hot, bath and wrap their face and ears in a moist, warm towel. Hot stoves and heaters, heating pads and a hot water bottle should be avoided, as skin may burn before feeling returns.

Frostbitten skin will become warm and swollen and feel as though it's on fire. Blisters may develop, but popping them can cause scarring, according to the National Weather Service. If skin is blue or gray, very swollen, blistered or feels hard and numb, go to the hospital immediately.

Frostbite stages:

Hypothermia occurs when a person's body temperature is below 96 degrees, and temperatures as low as 60 degrees can cause hypothermia if someone isn't properly clothed.

Remember these tips to help prevent hypothermia