Ohio governor candidates on the issues: Funds for local governments


On Sept. 19, governor candidates Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray are taking part in their first debate at the University of Dayton.

The Dayton Daily News, WHIO-TV and WHIO Radio are the media partners for the 7 p.m. debate.

Ohio governor debate in Dayton Wednesday: How to watch, listen and follow online

The debate will be moderated by News Center 7 anchor James Brown. Questions will be asked by Dayton Daily News Columbus Bureau reporter Laura Bischoff, News Center 7 reporter and WHIO Reports host Jim Otte and University of Dayton assistant political science professor Christopher Devine.

Related: Dayton to host first governor debate at UD

Ahead of the debate, we are taking a look at where DeWine and Cordray stand on key issues such as    taxes and local governments.

Q: Schools, cities and counties continue to complain that state funding has been cut, forcing them to cut services and/or raise local taxes. How will you work with local governments?

Mike DeWine: There is no question that the relationship between the state and local governments is important if we are to move Ohio forward together, and I am committed to strengthening those relationships as governor.

Being a former county prosecutor, I know the demands our counties face with limited resources, and I am committed to being a partner with our community leaders on behalf of the constituents we both serve.

Right now, one of the biggest challenges our local communities are facing is the opioid epidemic. Tragically, our foster care system is bursting at the seams, and it is crushing local budgets.

As governor, I am committed to increasing resources for children’s services, in particular, to ensure that our at-risk youth are protected and get the help they need.

Richard Cordray: As I campaign, I see many heads nod from the rural areas and small and mid-sized towns around Ohio when I detail the relentless war on local governments that the Republican state legislature has been waging for years now.

This must change.

It’s wrong, and it will not be our approach to governing. We must support the devoted local public servants I know all over Ohio.

They deliver critical services to raise the quality of life in our communities. They simply want a strong framework, steady resources, and good partners in state government who will listen and respond to the needs of their communities.

I call that the Ohio way, and it is how we can best address our challenges in this state.



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