Public transit and green energy advocates drink water collected from the tailpipe of a new hydrogen fuel cell powered bus at the Ohio Statehouse.

Public officials drink from the tail pipe of a bus

A plastic cup placed on the pavement under the gleaming $2-million bus collected a steady drip of clear water as the high-tech machine ran silently.

At a press conference outside the Ohio Statehouse, public transit officials hoisted cups of the tailpipe brew and proclaimed it downright tasty. This reporter took a swig swig and proclaimed it a little funny tasting but not bad.

The tail pipe drinking stunt was part of the Ohio Public Transit Association’s lobbying day at the Ohio Statehouse.

The Stark Area Regional Transit Authority has two hydrogen fuel cell powered buses — one that is in the testing phase and another that will be loaned for a year to Ohio State University’s Center for Automotive Research — and eight more on order. Once all 10 are in hand, SARTA will have the third largest fuel cell bus fleet outside of California.

Mark Donaghy, chief executive of the Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority, said Dayton’s investment in electric-powered buses means it won’t shift to fuel cell powered buses any time soon.

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