breaking news

Park Layne businesses rebuilt, thriving year after tornado

Peace march unites different sides of Springfield


Four directions came together as one in the name of peace prior to Springfield’s National Night Out festivities at Snyder Park on Tuesday, Aug. 1.

People from the south and west sides of town wore red and approached from the park’s south end and others representing the north and east clad in blue came down Bechtle Avenue from the north, all participating in Springfield Promise Neighborhood’s second peace march.

The two sides met at the park’s green bridge, some holding signs to make the community a better place overall as they crossed to the festival area.

Springfield native Kenneth Applin participated in Promise Neighborhood’s first peace march in 2015 when National Night Out was at City Hall Plaza. He made it a point to return for this initial event in Snyder Park.

“When you think about how the north and south came together here it’s an eye-opener,” said Applin. “Now we’re here with friends we haven’t met yet. We need to come together as a nation like this.”

Monica Lasiter, Springfield Promise Neighborhood’s neighborhood liaison and march organizer estimated about 20 people participated. She hopes this will be a permanent prelude to future National Night Out events here.

The march was also to support the Springfield Police Department, which sponsors National Night Out locally, an event that promotes community involvement. Springfield Promise Neighborhood is a nonprofit group working to improve life in the neighborhoods near Lincoln Elementary School.

Bruce Vincent, a chaplain at Springfield Masonic Community, was encouraged by the pastor at his church to join the march. He pointed to the children on swings in the park as why it’s important.

“We need to think about what’s going on with violence and opioids for them,” Vincent said.

Dr. Robert Welker, Director of Springfield Promise Neighborhood, echoed that thought, saying it is a teaching moment when children see there are caring people in the community.

“Peace for a lot of us can be about alternatives and positive opportunities. It can be something like taking care of a neighbor who needs help.”



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in News

Park Layne businesses rebuilt, thriving year after tornado
Park Layne businesses rebuilt, thriving year after tornado

A Clark County community is still recovering from a massive storm with several tornadoes that caused serious damage to several local businesses a year ago. An EF-1 tornado, with winds of 100 miles per hour, struck businesses in Park Layne causing extensive damage to a Sunoco gas station, a Family Dollar store and the Mel-O-Dee, a popular restaurant...
Morgan Freeman friend defends actor after misconduct allegations, speaks out against accusers
Morgan Freeman friend defends actor after misconduct allegations, speaks out against accusers

At least eight women have accused actor Morgan Freeman of inappropriate behavior, according to a report from CNN. The women said the behavior happened on and off movie sets. >> Read more trending news  Freeman is an Academy Award-winning actor, but he's also a business owner in Clarksdale, Mississippi. Two blocks around the corner...
Fort Ancient, other Ohio sites step closer to World Heritage status
Fort Ancient, other Ohio sites step closer to World Heritage status

The Fort Ancient Earthworks in Warren County and other sites comprising Ohio’s Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks are big step closer to being designated as World Heritage sites. RELATED: Lawmakers join push for World Heritage status “The U.S. Department of the Interior is scheduled to publish a notice in the Federal Register tomorrow inviting...
Police: Driver finds gun stuck in front of his car
Police: Driver finds gun stuck in front of his car

Police said a driver on I-5 saw a "black object" moving through the air and, when he pulled over miles later, near Lakewood, Washington, he found a gun stuck in the front of his car.  The driver continued for about 18 miles after the object struck his car, and then stopped for gas, Washington Trooper Guy Gill said.  Photos show...
Scientists worry brain-wasting ‘zombie deer’ disease could spread to humans
Scientists worry brain-wasting ‘zombie deer’ disease could spread to humans

Deer across North America are dying from a mysterious disease that gradually destroys the animal’s nervous system, and scientists are concerned that the infection could spread to humans.  >> Read more trending news  Chronic wasting disease — or “zombie deer disease” — was first observed in 1967 in Fort...
More Stories