Watch live: Corpse flower blooms

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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What You Need To Know: Corpse Flower

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

A rose by any other name, in this case Rosie, would smell as sweet. That's the saying right? Well when it comes to the flower about to open at the Cox Butterfly and Orchid Pavilion of the Tucson Botanical Gardens it won't be a sweet smell that Rosie's visitors will notice now that it bloomed. It is a pungent one.

Corpse flowers are known for the massive, beautiful flower that gives off a not so beautiful smell -- but that of a rotting corpse.

YurView.com is offering live, up-to-the moment updates of Rosie's bloom and even offered a livestream of the waiting game.

Technically, a corpse flower is called Amorphophallus titanum, and is one of the world’s largest and rarest flowers.

The entire process of a bloom can take a decade, with the flower lasting only 24-36 hours.

Because of how rare of an event of a corpse flower blooming, people booked flights to see the big reveal in person, according to Yurview.com. The Cox Butterfly and Orchid Pavilion of the Tucson Botanical Gardens also got a hand with the crush of people expected to pay her a visit with the Chicago Botanic Garden lending the garden in Tucson educational interpretive signs for visitors. Botanists from Chicago's garden also sent pollen from its corpse flowers, Sumatra and Sunshine, to help pollinate Rosie. Michael Madsen is in charge of tracking Rosie's progression, by taking temperature measurements and then will help spread the pollen at the perfect time.

Rosie’s about 9 years old, about 3 feet tall and came from the University of California Fullerton. It is her first time to flower.

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