Video: Honor guard stops to ask man to stand during 4th of July parade

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

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The History of the National Anthem

Credit: DaytonDailyNews

A Facebook video out of Ohio is gaining attention after a member of the honor guard asked a spectator if he was disabled and unable to stand as the U.S. flag passed him during the West Milton Independence Day Parade.

In the video, Dennis Albaugh asks a man if he has a disability. He goes on to ask the man to stand if he doesn't, and the man ultimately stands.

An honor guard member said the video doesn't capture the entire story.

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"It's a service we've been doing for years," said Albaugh, a 20-year U.S. Air Force veteran and the man questioning a spectator in the video. "It's all about educating the community…As an American, you should feel the pride that you want to stand for the flag."

Albaugh has marched in the West Milton parade for about 10 years and said it's a tradition for the honor guard to stop if they observe spectators sitting in the crowd. On average, he estimates they have to stop and ask people to stand two to three times per parade.

"It's been a practice of mine most of the time," Albaugh said. "Most people stand right up, no problem."

The video was posted as protests over standing during the national anthem continue to be a topic of discussion across the U.S.

In the spring, the NFL approved a new national anthem policy that will allow teams to fine players and other personnel who do not stand and "show respect for the flag and the Anthem," according to a statement from the league.

Albaugh said his message during the parade was not meant to create controversy, but instead, he wants the younger generation to continue traditions that have been ongoing for years.

"If we don't continue to teach our younger generation,those traditions will die," he said.

The veteran said he sees division among citizens in the country and he has hope his service can help create a positive message.

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Albaugh said his message during the parade was not meant to create controversy, but instead he wants the younger generation to continue traditions that have been ongoing for years. (File photo)

Albaugh said his message during the parade was not meant to create controversy, but instead he wants the younger generation to continue traditions that have been ongoing for years. (File photo)

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Albaugh said his message during the parade was not meant to create controversy, but instead he wants the younger generation to continue traditions that have been ongoing for years. (File photo)

"West Milton is one of the strongest patriotic places," Albaugh said. "It's about educating and promoting Americanism."