The sudden end of the Robert Kirkman’s graphic comic series led AMC to release a statement to assure fans that the zombies will live on in other forms, be it on TV, film and video games. (Photo: Jerod Harris/Getty Images)
Photo: Jerod Harris/Getty Images
Photo: Jerod Harris/Getty Images

The end of 'The Walking Dead' comics does not mean the end of 'The Walking Dead' universe

The sudden end of the Robert Kirkman’s graphic comic series led AMC to release a statement to assure fans that the zombies will live on in other forms, be it TV, film and video games.

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“This extraordinary comic created a world that already lives in multiple forms, and in the hearts and minds of millions of fans around the world, and will for many years to come,” the network said in a statement.

AMC has had plans to keep the “Walking Dead” universe alive for decades to come, along the lines of James Bond and “Star Trek.” So this does not change that strategy at all. 

Kirkman’s graphic series began in 2003 and became a raging success. He collaborated with AMC and Frank Darabont to create the network’s first horror drama “The Walking Dead” in 2010. That became an even bigger hit, the largest basic cable series in history. 

Despite the show’s massive 60 percent-plus drop-off in popularity over the past three years, it's currently shooting season 10 in Senoia and AMC has not even hinted at the show ending its run. In the meantime, spinoff “Fear the Walking Dead” is currently in its fifth season. And a second spinoff show is in the works. And don’t forget the upcoming Rick Grimes series of films. 

The original TV series has followed some plot lines and characters associated with the graphic novel. But there have been some massive deviations over the first nine seasons.

Carl Grimes died in season eight but made it to the end of the comics. Rick Grimes died on the show long before the comics. Of course, Daryl never existed in the comics. And Carol was a minor character who died early in the comics. 

“In a way, killing this [comic] series has been a lot like killing a major character,” Kirkman explained. “Much, much harder … but the same feeling. I don’t WANT to do it. I’d rather keep going … But the story is telling me what it wants and what it needs. This needs to happen, whether I want it or not.”

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