Protesters climb construction crane in downtown Washington

Greenpeace protesters unfurl a banner that reads "Resist" at the construction site of the former Washington Post building, near the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, after police say protesters climbed a crane at the site refusing to allow workers to work in the area. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
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Greenpeace protesters unfurl a banner that reads "Resist" at the construction site of the former Washington Post building, near the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017, after police say protesters climbed a crane at the site refusing to allow workers to work in the area. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Seven protesters from Greenpeace are taking their cause to new heights.

Just a few blocks away from the White House, protesters climbed a 270-foot crane Wednesday at a construction site downtown.

They unveiled a 70-by-35 foot banner with the word "RESIST" in bold, black letters.

The anti-Trump protest comes after the president pushed to delay implementing 30 new environmental laws, and his desire to bring back both the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines.

The White House has said President Trump’s environmental policies will create jobs, increase national security and speed up infrastructure projects.

Greenpeace is encouraging people to show resistance to Trump.

"This demonstration is calling for those who want to resist Trump’s attacks on environmental, social, economic and educational justice to contribute to a better America," said Travis Nichols, spokesman for Greenpeace.

Washington’s Metropolitan Police Department did not approve the Greenpeace protest.

"A small group of protesters have engaged in dangerous behavior in downtown Washington, DC.  While we respect everyone’s right to protest, today’s actions are extremely dangerous and unlawful.  Multiple government resources are being tied up, and unfortunately streets are blocked while first responders try to safely address this matter," the police department said in a statement.

Law enforcement used yellow tape to mark off an area close to the crane.

"The shear talent it takes to bring something up that big, with those two men weighing it down on either side, it’s pretty amazing," said Eden Campbell, passing by the scene. "I think the message is that if you mess with the EPA people are going to respond."

Mary Eveleigh, who was observing the protesters hanging by the crane said she was concerned about what would happen to the protesters once they come down.

"I’m curious to see how they are going to be arrested, if they are," she said,