Astronomers confirm they have photographic proof of newborn planet

The photo provided by the European Southern Observatory ESO taken from the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope is the first clear image of a planet caught in the very act of formation around the dwarf star PDS 70. The planet stands clearly out, visible as a bright point to the right of the centre of the image, which is blacked out by the coronagraph mask used to block the blinding light of the central star. (ESO via AP)
Caption
The photo provided by the European Southern Observatory ESO taken from the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope is the first clear image of a planet caught in the very act of formation around the dwarf star PDS 70. The planet stands clearly out, visible as a bright point to the right of the centre of the image, which is blacked out by the coronagraph mask used to block the blinding light of the central star. (ESO via AP)

It’s something that has rarely, if ever been seen, but scientists have announced that they’ve captured the image of a newborn planet.

The image released by European Southern Observatory looks like a wispy mass of gases, but to the right of the dark center, is a round shape that scientists say is the newborn planet, now called PDS 70b. It is named after the dwarf star PDS 70, CNN reported.

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It was found using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile and a planet-hunting device called SPHERE, CNN reported.

The new planet is a giant gas planet and has a surface temperature of 1,932 degrees Fahrenheit and is larger than Jupiter. It also has a cloudy atmosphere, CNN reported.

While the image of the planet may look like it is close to its star, the new planet is as far as Uranus is from our sun, The Guardian reported.

It also orbits a star that when speaking of space is relatively young, only five to six million years old. The planet itself may be even younger, The Guardian reported.

The research was published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics this week.