Stanley Cup wows at Miami University


The crowds that gathered Wednesday at Goggin Ice Center were wowed by one of sports most legendary trophies — the Stanley Cup.

Washington Capitals goalkeeper coach Mitch Korn brought the trophy for a public viewing at Miami University’s Goggin Ice Center, where hundreds of students and fans gathered to take pictures and pose with the cup won by the Capitals in June. During the event, some fans kissed the trophy and one even posed their baby inside the cup.

Korn joined the Miami team in 1981, when the team had just started with the Central Collegiate Hockey Association, and worked as a coach for seven years. One of the goalies he coached was Alain Chevrier, who became the first RedHawk to play in the NHL. Chevrier’s jersey hung in the background of the ceremony at Goggin, along with dozens of other Miami players who had went on to play professionally since him.

“We were an expansion team of sorts,” Korn said. “It’s great to see where it is now, and the number of players who have now gone on to play in the NHL, the number of players that have been involved in winning Stanley Cups. You would have never thought that was going to happen back in 1981.”

The ceremony also included the unveiling of a poster honoring Korn’s Stanley Cup win in the lobby of Goggin. Korn is the fourth person Miami has honored with a poster after winning the Stanley Cup, and the first to win as a coach instead of a player. The other three similar murals are for Kevyn Adams, Dan Boyle, and two-time Stanley Cup champion Alec Martinez.

Korn said that there was never a doubt he would bring the trophy to Miami. He explained that before most of his NHL seasons, the team would bring in a motivational speaker and have the locker room imagine what they would do on their day with the Stanley Cup should they win hockey’s big championship.

“Any time I’ve been in that exercise, it’s always come to Miami University. Originally it was the old Goggin and in the last 12 years it’s been this new Goggin,” Korn said.

Korn wasn’t the only Capitals connection to Miami. He was introduced at the ceremony by John Walton, a Miami university alum who works as the radio broadcaster for the Washington Capitals.




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