Community Mercy Health Partner’s new 3D Mobily Mammography Vehicle. Bill Lackey/Staff

Springfield groups ready for second Minority Health Fair

Organizers of the second annual Minority Health Fair hope this year’s event is as successful as the first.

More than 200 people attended the event last year, according to NAACP President Denise D. Williams. Four participants, however, are etched into Williams’ memory still.

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“I believe we had the mammogram bus, and we had four women who came and had a mammogram, and they ended up having issues,” Williams said.

Testing revealed those women had breast cancer.

“For us and them, it’s a blessing that we caught it all in time,” Williams said.

That was the standout moment for Williams at the health fair.

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“Just to think, if we hadn’t have done that, what would have happened?” Williams said.

She doesn’t want to think about that and stressed why it’s important to have this annual event.

The health fair is sponsored by the Springfield NAACP, The Links Inc. Springfield chapter, Clark County Combined Health District, and the Community Mercy Foundation.

Free services like blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar screenings will be provided.

More than 40 vendors will be present like Second Harvest Mobile Pantry, Buckeye Health Plan, Blackstone, Cancer Mobile Truck, Gamma House, Planned Parenthood, Project Woman and the Mercy Health Mobile Mammogram Truck, Williams said, in addition to several doctors from different specialties.

Men will also have the chance to have their prostate checked.

The goal of this annual fair, Williams said, is to encourage people to find healthcare providers, and she hopes that they do.

The Second Annual NAACP Minority Health Fair will be Saturday, April 29. It will be held at Fulton Elementary on South Yellow Springs Street from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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