Dayton VA loses $90K in equipment. Why that’s ‘as close to zero as we can reasonably get.’


The Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center lost more than $90,000 in equipment between 2014 and 2017, according to a new investigation.

Dayton VA Public Affairs Officer Ted Froats said the number, which equates to about $22,500 a year, represents a fraction of the Dayton VA’s yearly inventory — around .0002 percent.

“The reality of running a 24/7 hospital with 500,000 outpatient visits a year is that that’s probably as close to zero as we can reasonably get,” Froats told this news organization in an email.

TRENDING: Dayton could lift 53-year ban on inner tubes, inflatables

VA facilities across the country lost more than $1 million in that time period, according to a WBNS-10TV investigation.

In Dayton, a total of $90,305 was lost.

John Hoellwarth, the national director of communications for AMVETS, said veterans deserve accountability regardless of the value.

“Whether it’s $1 million or $1.50, veterans deserve a VA that’s accountable,” Hoellwarth said.

Froats said that from 2015 to 2016, the Dayton VA cut their lost equipment per year in half, and the organization continued that progress into 2017.

The Dayton VA lost the least amount of equipment of the centers that were investigated. In Columbus, the VA facility lost $318,068.38; in Chillicothe, that number was $279,912.45.

The losses came even after the VA spent $24 million in Ohio to attach tracking devices to some equipment. The tracking devices, also known as real-time location systems or RTLS, either ping out a device’s location or allow a VA employee to scan for the items to keep track of them, according to the investigation.

TRENDING: Target to expand new ‘Drive Up’ service to Ohio this week

That doesn’t mean the devices will always work. According to records obtained as part of the investigation, the Dayton VA hired a contractor in 2014 to do an inventory of its equipment inventory listings, but the contractor left more than 1,000 items out of the inventory.

According to the records, the individuals that installed the RTLS in Dayton “did not perform well” and some of the devices were shown as being in rooms other than what they were, making the RTLS useless in the facility’s search for the lost items.

Records noted that the VA expected to find most or all of the missing equipment with the next inventory.

“It is our belief these items are not stolen and should be identified when the next wall-to-wall inventory is conducted,” the report reads.

TRENDING: Male Uber drivers make more money than women, new report shows

Froats said theft isn’t always the cause of losses, and items like stretchers or infusion pumps that travel with patients and can be mixed up in other units or even another hospital.

Froats said the Dayton VA prides itself on keeping track of its equipment.

“I’m a taxpayer, my boss is a taxpayer, her boss is a taxpayer,” Froats said. “We take lost equipment very seriously at the Dayton VAMC, and that’s why we’re proud to be the best in Ohio – successfully tracking 99.9998 percent of our annual inventory.”



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in Military

Air Force rolls out new enlisted personnel handbook: Here’s what changed
Air Force rolls out new enlisted personnel handbook: Here’s what changed

The U.S. Air Force just rolled out its new enlisted personnel handbook, and it’s changing up the way enlisted airmen will address senior master sergeants. Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright announced the changes on Facebook. The Air Force no longer requires an associate’s degree from the Community College of the Air Force...
Dayton VA loses $90K in equipment. Why that’s ‘as close to zero as we can reasonably get.’
Dayton VA loses $90K in equipment. Why that’s ‘as close to zero as we can reasonably get.’

The Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center lost more than $90,000 in equipment between 2014 and 2017, according to a new investigation. Dayton VA Public Affairs Officer Ted Froats said the number, which equates to about $22,500 a year, represents a fraction of the Dayton VA’s yearly inventory — around .0002 percent. “The reality of...
Thunderbirds celebrate milestone year representing US Air Force
Thunderbirds celebrate milestone year representing US Air Force

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds have been roaring through the skies for 65 years. The Thunderbirds are celebrating its 65th year of representing the U.S. Air Force. On May 25, 1953, the Air Force’s official air demonstration team, designated the 3600th Air Demonstration Unit, was activated at Luke Air Force Base in Arizona. The unit was named...
Verizon’s new military discount program could save you hundreds
Verizon’s new military discount program could save you hundreds

Verizon’s new military discount program could save you hundreds of dollars every year. Last week, Verizon launched its new program — active military, veterans and Gold Star families are eligible to save up to $40 every month on their cellphone plans. The deal offers $15 off regular monthly prices on one phone plan. It also offers $30 off...
10 major Wright-Patt updates that happened in June
10 major Wright-Patt updates that happened in June

Wright-Patterson Air Force Base got a new installation commander, UDRI landed a $72 million Air Force contract, and the Dayton VA Medical Center named a new associate director. Here’s what you need to know about what happened in military and veteran news last month: Col. Thomas P. Sherman made two firsts in June: He made his first trip to the...
More Stories