Diavolo to dazzle Springfield with architecture in motion

Feb 01, 2018
  • By Brett Turner
  • Contributing Writer
Diavolo/Architecture in Motion will bring the energy that stunned audiences on “America’s Got Talent” to the Clark State Performing Arts Center. CONTRIBUTED

Even if you are the world’s most talented dancer, to join Diavolo/Architecture in Motion, you’d need more than just the right moves.

Diavolo isn’t just modern dance, it’s half-creation and half-outreach.

“We’re not your normal dance company. We’re looking for someone who can do more than dance and do cool tricks,” said Connor Senning, Diavolo dancer and associate rehearsal director. “We’re looking for a specific breed — a scientist, a construction worker, somebody who can teach and you can trust.”

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The group that thrilled audiences on “America’s Got Talent” by taking the Judges’ Choice Award and appearing in the finals, will have audiences “L.O.S.T. “ in its creativity at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 9, at the Clark State Performing Arts Center.

Diavolo is presented by the Clark State Performing Arts Center as part of its Club Kuss Series.

While Diavolo is known for its risky acrobatics and movements, Senning stresses this isn’t a circus variation. It’s a combination of modern dance, hip-hop and ballet with layers that come on top of each other.

“L.O.S.T.,” or Losing One’s Self Temporarily, consists of two 30-minute pieces, both performed on “America’s Got Talent” last summer in three-minute versions. The first piece, “Passenger,” represents prisoners or refugees who are trying to escape the system or being part of the machine.

“It’s about hope, pain and the many layers about going to unknown destinations that can be interpreted in many ways,” Senning said.

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The second piece, “Trajectoire,” is what Senning describes as an “extra cool wow piece.” It also brings the architecture in motion part to life.

“Trajectoire” incorporates a 3,000-pound boat of steel and wood that rocks back and forth and finds the dancers launching themselves off of it as part of an abstract narrative.

It’s that element that separates Diavolo’s 12 dancers — six men and six women — and bonds them at the same time as they need to trust each other to make it work.

“When you put people in danger, it brings them closer together,” Senning said.

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Diavolo is also bringing people together with The Veterans Project, working with actual military veterans in the performance as a form of a way of giving back and helping these heroes get recognition.

They will do special shows in February at Washington, D.C.’s Kennedy Center with this theme.

Senning added that part of the fun is performing in new places, such as Springfield.

“We’re always excited to go to a new city and discovering it and the people,” he said.