Some employers see perks of hiring older workers

Older people searching for jobs have long fought back stereotypes that they lack the speed, technology skills and dynamism of younger applicants. But as a wave of baby boomers seeks to stay on the job later in life, some employers are finding older workers are precisely what they need.

“There’s no experience like experience,” said David Mintz, CEO of dairy-free products maker Tofutti, where about one-third of the workers are over 50. “I can’t put an ad saying, ‘Older people wanted,’ but there’s no comparison.”

Surveys consistently show older people believe they experience age discrimination on the job market, and although unemployment is lower among older workers, long-term unemployment is far higher. As the American population and its labor force reshape, though, with a larger chunk of older workers, some employers are slowly recognizing their skill and experience.

About 200 employers, from Google to AT&T to MetLife, have signed an AARP pledge recognizing the value of experienced workers and vowing to consider applicants 50 and older.

One of them, New York-based KPMG, has found success with a high proportion of older workers, who bring experience that the company says adds credibility. The auditing, tax and advisory firm says older workers also tend to be more dedicated to staying with the company, a plus for clients who like to build a relationship with a consultant they can count on to be around for years.

“Some Gen Ys and Millennials have this notion of, ‘I will have five jobs in 10 years,’” said Sig Shirodkar, a human resources executive at KPMG. “We’re looking for ways to tame that beast.”

Many employers find older workers help them connect with older clients. At the Vermont Country Store in Rockingham, Vt., the average customer is now in their 60s, and about half of the business’ 400 workers are over 50, coming from a range of professional backgrounds, often outside retail. “Having folks internally that are in the same demographic certainly helps to create credibility and to have empathy for our customer,” said Chris Vickers, the store’s chief executive.

One such employee is 60-year-old Ashley Roland, who got a marketing job at the Vermont Country Store last year after the company she previously worked for shut down. She dreaded the thought of a marathon of unsuccessful interviews, but the store ended up recruiting her.

“When I was being hired, I didn’t feel any kind of concern about my age,” she said. “I believe in experience. I think you’re crazy not to hire someone who’s older.”

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