Report: Amazon removes sale of hair dryer shown on video shooting flames


A hair dryer manufactured in China has reportedly been pulled from Amazon after a viral video showed it shooting flames. A South Carolina woman posted the video on Facebook last month after she said she purchased the dryer online for less than $30.

“Talk about a bad hair day!” Erika Shoolbred posted on January 29. “My new hair dryer (more like hair fryer) from OraCorp on Amazon.com became a blow torch on its first use this morning.”

Amazon says blow dryer shown shooting flames is ‘no longer available’

“Oh my gosh. I can not freakin’ believe this,” the Spartanburg woman says in a second video. “Fire is coming out of the hair dryer.” Shoolbred said that she suffered a burn on her hand and contacted the manufacturer about the issue but did not hear back.

The hair dryer is question, Salon Grade Hair Dryer, is made by OraCorp, which still has several products for sale on its Amazon storefront.

When reached by Team Clark, a representative for Amazon said that the product was “no longer available.”

RELATED: See our recall section for more product news

How to know if you have a product liability claim

Depending on how serious the issue is, you may have a product liability claim. According to the Consumerprotectionlawfirms.com, the three most common product liability claims are:

  • Manufacturing Defect – When the quality of a product can be proved faulty due to its manufacturing.
  • Marketing Defect – When there is evidence that what the company promises or boasts is false based on the product’s instructions.
  • Design Defect – When a product is used as intended but turns out to cause bodily harm or is dangerous because of how it’s designed.

Scanning the comments on the Facebook post as well as similar hair dryers on Amazon, we see that many people have had similar issues with blow dryers that overheat. Have you ever experienced a malfunctioning product that led to a situation like this? If so, let us know in the comments.

RELATED: Apple may give rebates on battery replacements for some iPhone users



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