Why employers aren't looking at your resume (and never will)

You've been online job hunting for some time now −  for six months or even a year − but you've had no callbacks. No follow-ups. No feedback that you're the right candidate for the thousands of open positions that relate to your skill set.

Well, your resume may be contributing to your not landing a job in the here and now.

»RELATED: VIDEO: 9 résumé-killers you should never include on any job application

"A few things can become resume roadblocks," said Tamara Jenkins, a human resources coordinator in higher education. "Unless you're in the arts, head shots on resumes are a no-no. I also find that people rarely proofread. There's nothing worse than candidates not taking the time to check for grammatical errors." She warns to double-check the salutation on the cover letter as well.

"Please take the time to make sure you're submitting for the correct job, too," Jenkins said. "This includes the objective on your resume. Even McDonald's doesn't appreciate receiving an objective on a resume saying how excited you are for an opportunity for rapid growth at Burger King."

Other reasons why your resume will never, ever, ever trend with employers:

The fonts are dated.

Employers have a lot of candidate profiles to sift through. If your resume layout and font selections aren't easy on the eyes or include overused throwbacks (like Times New Roman and Arial) that's an immediate NEXT! Avoid fancy fonts like Apple chancery and typewriter fonts like Courier New as well. Instead, stick with easy-to-scan, balanced fonts like Georgia, Garamond and Calibri.

The format is too complex.

Keep the bolded, bulleted and italicized sections of your resume to a minimum. Yes, you want your resume to have order, but convoluted text only discourages employers from reading more about you. Whether you're presenting a chronological resume (formatting your experience from newest to oldest), functional resume (formatting your experience from most relevant to the open position) or both, focus on the facts in a clear, concise structure.

The word choice, descriptors are either too generic or too specific.

Sell yourself from the top of the resume to the end. Make yourself memorable by highlighting your strengths using details and stating a strong case for why you're the best one-stop shop in your field, especially in your objective statement. Avoid using common phrases like, "My objective is to find a job that fits my skills as a computer programmer." That says absolutely nothing about your worth to employers. And definitely don't take the self-serving route of declarations such as, "To secure a steady job that earns more than $70,000 annually." Instead, pump up your talents by underlining how you can benefit the company in the long run.

The typos are visibly disappointing.

If you meant "their" but spelled it "there," well there goes your chance of getting a callback. Employers are looking for candidates who pay attention to details, no matter the career field. Grammatical errors instantly count you out, so avoid these minor blunders by editing and proofreading (and editing and proofreading some more). Ask a couple of family members or friends to review your work before submitting.

The resume isn't customized to the job description.

Think you can send the same resume to every employer out there without matching your experience to the company's needs? Think again. Employers are looking for candidates that align with certain attributes and experiences outlined in the job posting. If you're sending off resumes that don't include specific buzz words or soft/hard skills, expect nothing in return. Avoid broad resumes that simply scratch the surface of your talent. Instead, study what employers are really searching for in the best candidate and honestly share your professional background in an engaging presentation that corresponds with the job post.

Reader Comments ...

Next Up in Business

Ohio-based Victor’s Taco Shop making its way to Springfield
Ohio-based Victor’s Taco Shop making its way to Springfield

Good news for Mexican food lovers in Springfield — a new option is coming your way. Victor’s Taco Shop, an authentic Mexican restaurant chain based out of Delaware, Ohio, will be opening soon. The location will fill the vacancy left by the former Krispy Krunchy Chicken location at 1929 E. Main St. Owner Hector Gonzales said the restaurant...
Amazon looking to buy abandoned Toys ‘R’ Us storefronts
Amazon looking to buy abandoned Toys ‘R’ Us storefronts

Amazon is looking to buy abandoned Toys ‘R’ Us storefronts once the company shuts them down for good. The online retail giant is looking at the possibility of acquiring some Toys ‘R’ Us locations as it expands its brick-and-mortar footprint across the country, Bloomberg reported. The stores could be used to showcase its Echo...
Young shoppers shift retail trends: ‘I never go to malls’
Young shoppers shift retail trends: ‘I never go to malls’

As retailers like Claire’s Stores and Toys ‘R’ Us file for bankruptcy, local experts say “specialty stores that don’t play up the experience of shopping are having a hard time competing with online retailers.” Claire’s Stores, a fashion accessories chain, filed for bankruptcy this week. The retailer and its...
Macy’s rolling out new mobile checkout at most store locations
Macy’s rolling out new mobile checkout at most store locations

Macy’s Inc. is introducing mobile checkout services at most of its store locations. Macy’s CEO Jeff Gennette told an audience at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Global Consumer & Retail Technology Conference in New York earlier this month that the retailer plans to test mobile checkout at about 450 of its 650 stores. Customers...
Worker dies in Fuyao forklift accident: What we know now
Worker dies in Fuyao forklift accident: What we know now

The identity of the forklift operator killed Tuesday at Fuyao Glass America Inc. has been identified as Ricky Patterson, 57, of Dayton, according to the Montgomery County Coroner's Office. The Fuyao worker died of blunt force trauma to the head while operating a forklift at the plant at 2801 W. Stroop Road, authorities said. No one else was reported...
More Stories