WSU cuts down layoff notice period for 1,000 as cuts loom


Wright State University officials are slashing the notice they have to give unclassified staff who are laid off as they prepare for staff cuts.

A change to university policy effective April 3 requires the university to give one week of notice to each unclassified laid off employee for each year of service, with a minimum of four weeks and a maximum of 24 weeks.

The change goes into effect the same month cuts and layoffs are expected to be announced to balance the university’s budget after over-spending.

RELATED: Interim WSU president has history of job, budget cutting at colleges

The pending policy is a drastic reduction from current policy, which says WSU unclassified staff members must be given notice prior to being laid off ranging from 2 months for employees of less than 3 years, to up to a year for employees who worked there 15 or more years.

This means an employee who is laid off after 10 years of service with the university will get to stay on the payroll for 2.5 months while finding a new job, instead of the nine months required in the current policy.

An email to staff announcing the change said WSU was the length of notice provided under the previous policy was at least twice as long as any other public university in Ohio.

“The revised policy continues to provide a period of transition for employees whose positions are eliminated through no fault of the employee, but also amends a financially imprudent approach,” it said.

RELATED: Wright State will not see layoff savings until 2017

The review found people given nine or 12 months of notice typically didn’t work the full time.

The university has roughly 1,000 unclassified employees. The policy change affects unclassified staff who are not employed with the university through special or renewable contracts, according to university officials.

The university’s total workforce is around 2,800, including union-represented faculty and contract employees who are not affected by the policy.

“The policy has been revised to better align with both industry best practices and current financial conditions,” said WSU spokesman Seth Bauguess in an email in response to questions.

“The policy needed revision because it was well outside industry best practices and out of alignment with the same policies at other Ohio public universities.”

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