WSU cuts down layoff notice period for 1,000 as cuts loom


Wright State University officials are slashing the notice they have to give unclassified staff who are laid off as they prepare for staff cuts.

A change to university policy effective April 3 requires the university to give one week of notice to each unclassified laid off employee for each year of service, with a minimum of four weeks and a maximum of 24 weeks.

The change goes into effect the same month cuts and layoffs are expected to be announced to balance the university’s budget after over-spending.

RELATED: Interim WSU president has history of job, budget cutting at colleges

The pending policy is a drastic reduction from current policy, which says WSU unclassified staff members must be given notice prior to being laid off ranging from 2 months for employees of less than 3 years, to up to a year for employees who worked there 15 or more years.

This means an employee who is laid off after 10 years of service with the university will get to stay on the payroll for 2.5 months while finding a new job, instead of the nine months required in the current policy.

An email to staff announcing the change said WSU was the length of notice provided under the previous policy was at least twice as long as any other public university in Ohio.

“The revised policy continues to provide a period of transition for employees whose positions are eliminated through no fault of the employee, but also amends a financially imprudent approach,” it said.

RELATED: Wright State will not see layoff savings until 2017

The review found people given nine or 12 months of notice typically didn’t work the full time.

The university has roughly 1,000 unclassified employees. The policy change affects unclassified staff who are not employed with the university through special or renewable contracts, according to university officials.

The university’s total workforce is around 2,800, including union-represented faculty and contract employees who are not affected by the policy.

“The policy has been revised to better align with both industry best practices and current financial conditions,” said WSU spokesman Seth Bauguess in an email in response to questions.

“The policy needed revision because it was well outside industry best practices and out of alignment with the same policies at other Ohio public universities.”

TOP RECENT WRIGHT STATE STORIES:

WSU president resigns, citing ongoing budget issues

WSU president reveals federal probe details in deposition

Cost of WSU probe tops $2M

New Wright State president says she’ll ‘right the ship very quickly’

Wright State trustee reprimanded over son’s hiring



Reader Comments ...


Next Up in News

Another home burns down in botched attempt to kill bedbugs with rubbing alcohol
Another home burns down in botched attempt to kill bedbugs with rubbing alcohol

Three people were hospitalized and 10 are homeless after a Cincinnati woman attempted to douse a bedbug infestation in her home with rubbing alcohol and started a house fire instead, authorities said. The rubbing alcohol — which is extremely flammable — ignited because of a nearby open flame, according to authorities cited by...
Pregnant woman fatally shot by boyfriend trying to end relationship, police say
Pregnant woman fatally shot by boyfriend trying to end relationship, police say

A man fatally shot his pregnant girlfriend Saturday in an attempt to end the relationship, police said. Keosha Miller, 22, was shot around around 6:59 p.m. in the Faronia Square Townhomes, Memphis police said.  Brandon Freeman was seen by witnesses, fleeing the residence at a high rate of speed, police said. The witnesses called Freeman to check...
US deportation flight returns from Africa with all on board
US deportation flight returns from Africa with all on board

The government’s efforts to deport 92 Somali nationals did not go as planned this week, when the flight encountered some snags in Senegal and returned to the U.S. with all on board. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement released a statement Saturday, saying relief flight crew members were “unable to get sufficient rest due to issues...
Anonymous donor buys every toy at Goodwill, gives them to children
Anonymous donor buys every toy at Goodwill, gives them to children

For nearly a decade, an anonymous donor has bought every toy in a Goodwill so that any child who walks through the door leaves with something.  Children who walked into the store on Saturday were invited to choose a toy, stuffed animal or a book, according to The Coloradoan. Tarryn Henkelman, 6, was able to replace her recently broken scooter...
Marijuana in Ohio: Details of new ballot initiative coming Monday
Marijuana in Ohio: Details of new ballot initiative coming Monday

Some of the team behind the failed effort to legalize marijuana for recreational and medical use in Ohio in 2015 are going back to voters again next year. Jimmy Gould, a backer of the 2015 statewide ballot issue, is expected to announce Monday that he and others are backing the “Free Market Adult Consumption of Marijuana” ballot issue in...
More Stories