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Terrorism still a possible scenario in vanishing plane mystery, WSU terrorism expert says


It’s too early to rule out terrorism as a possible answer to the question of what happend to missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, its crew and 239 passengers, a terrorism expert at Wright State University said.

Satellite images of what could be the remains of the plane in the Southern Indian Ocean has set off new rounds of speculation among local experts.

Donna Schlagheck, chair of political science at WSU, said that although there has been a decline in the number of international hijackings since Sept. 11 in part because of all the safety precautions that have been implemented, modern terrorism has shown it is adaptable.

Screening passengers and crew, locking cockpit doors, and other security methods would have to be circumvented. Signaling systems aboard the plane that allow it to be tracked apparently stopped functioning in the sequence of events that surrouded the disappearance.

“Terrorism does not cease to surprise or adapt,” she said.

Schlagheck also would like to hear more from the Peoples Republic of China about what government officials there might know or have some evidence about. “China has been very quiet. Half of those on board were from there. What is going on behind the scenes there?”

If the plane landed in some remote area as part of some terrorist plot, it would still need jet fuel to take off again, a very difficult logistical problem to solve, Schlagheck added.


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