Sequestration cuts: Wright-Patt staff ‘in this together’


Those at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base are readying for the effects of sequestration.

Base commanders said they are planning for a 10- to 15-percent reduction in their operations. The Pentagon has not released specific numbers, so anticipated cuts in services and furloughs for employees will not start just yet.

Employees are preparing for what’s ahead and some said they are angry with the members of Congress for not coming to an agreement.

Jene Curell, Chief of Installation Protocol, said when the sting of sequestration is truly felt, she’ll be “one on the ground floor to pick up pieces.”

Commanders expect the reductions to include reduced hours for base facilities and 22-day furloughs for civilian employees.

Curell said she will endure a 20 percent pay cut alongside those losing wages, saying military and civilians are “in this together.”


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