Netroots Nation: Things to know about the Atlanta meeting


Netroots Nation, a four-day conference of left-leaning activists, opened Thursday in Atlanta. 

“Part pep rally and part insurgency training,” according to a preview on MyAJC.com,  “the conference includes nearly 200 panels and training sessions designed to teach progressive activists how to reclaim state legislatures, advance LGBT rights in the South and master social media strategy.”

Here are some things to know about Netroots Nation 2017:

Who attends?

Netroots Nation said on its web site that the conference attracts a cross-section of those who call themselves progressives, including “online organizers, grassroots activists and independent media makers,” plus advocacy organizations and supportive companies and labor unions.

Is there a live stream or other ways to follow?

AJC will provide coverage on ajc.com, MyAJC.com and the Political Insider blog. Netroots Nation is posting updates, with some live video on Facebook. Social media updates on Twitter are using #NN17 as the hashtag.

The official website is netrootsnation.org.

When and where is the conference?

Aug. 10-13, 2017 at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta, 265 Peachtree Street NE, (404) 577-1234

HELPFUL LINKS

Netroots Nation conference video and live streams on Facebook

Netroots schedule, including speaker biographies

More things to do in Atlanta this weekend

ALSO in the News: Protesters gather at Rep. Doug Collins Town Hall

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICAL NEWS

If it happens in Washington or under the Gold Dome — or somewhere else — and it affects Georgians, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has somebody there to tell you what it means. Follow our coverage at http://www.myAJC.com/politics.

Netroots coverage

Follow news from the Netroots Nation as it happens at http://politics.blog.ajc.com/.

Also, see a story about liberals’ ambitions for winning in the South in Sunday’s Atlanta Journal-Constitution.


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