You have reached your limit of free articles this month.

Enjoy unlimited access to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Starting at just 99¢ for 8 weeks.

GREAT REASONS TO SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

  • IN-DEPTH REPORTING
  • INTERACTIVE STORYTELLING
  • NEW TOPICS & COVERAGE
  • ePAPER
X

You have read of premium articles.

Get unlimited access to all of our breaking news, in-depth coverage and interactive features. Starting at just 99c for 8 weeks.

X

Welcome to SpringfieldNewsSun.com

Your source for Clark and Champaign counties’ hometown news. All readers have free access to a limited number of stories every month.

If you are a News-Sun subscriber, please take a moment to login for unlimited access.

Ohio seeks to overhaul Medicaid eligibility system


By ANN SANNER

Associated Press

Ohio is closer to replacing an outdated computer system that’s known for rejecting eligible people from the Medicaid program and accepting others who don’t meet the criteria.

Officials said Wednesday the state will contract with Accenture LLC for a new system that will help determine who’s eligible for programs across Ohio’s health and human services agencies.

The move comes as the governor says he plans to expand the Medicaid program to cover more low-income people under President Barack Obama’s health care law. Gov. John Kasich unveiled his decision on Medicaid expansion in his two-year state budget proposal on Monday.

The Kasich administration anticipates that almost 366,000 Ohioans will be eligible for coverage beginning in 2014 by expanding Medicaid, the health program for the poor that already provides care for one of every five residents in the state.

The state also is bracing for 230,000 eligible Ohioans to sign up for Medicaid once the federal law requires most people to have health insurance.

Kasich’s proposed budget includes $230 million for the eligibility system upgrade, though the federal government would reimburse the state for most of the cost. The state’s share of the bill is expected to be $26 million over the two-year budget.

The state’s current eligibility system, known as CRIS-E, was launched in 1978. The administration says it’s “so fragile and technically obsolete that it is no longer practical or cost effective to invest in enhancing the system.”

The state estimates that 60 percent of CRIS-E’s eligibility determinations for Medicaid are inaccurate and must be manually overridden to prevent applicants from being denied coverage or remove those who weren’t eligible.

Officials say the move will make applicants’ lives easier.

“This new system will allow more Ohioans to apply for services online, instead of waiting in line,” said Greg Moody, director of the governor’s Office of Health Transformation.

Ohio Medicaid Director John McCarthy said most who fill out the online applications would find out quickly whether they’re eligible for the Medicaid program, without having to leave their home and go to a county office.

The state also wants to use the system to determine whether applicants are eligible for food or cash assistance programs.

“We’re all working together to make it as seamless for a person as possible,” McCarthy said.

The system will begin enrolling people in Medicaid by Jan. 1.


Reader Comments ...


Next Up in News

Local students busing to inauguration without tickets
Local students busing to inauguration without tickets

Area teens will soon be busing to the nation’s capital to witness America’s historical presidential inauguration, but their journey is also a leap of faith because most don’t have tickets for the ceremony. Still, the Butler and Warren County high school seniors — and school officials — from Madison High School, Butler...
An end to the circus

It may not have been universally beloved, but it was undeniably iconic. And now, it is no more. The famed Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus announced last week that after 146 years, it’s shutting down in May. The Feld family, which owns the Florida-based brand, said declining attendance was the problem, and blamed a number of things:...
Ever wonder why road salt in Clark County is blue?
Ever wonder why road salt in Clark County is blue?

It was entertaining last week thinking about road salt being little bits of tropical seas making our icy roads safer. However, after speaking to some of you, I realized I need to clarify something. The road salt many of us see piled at the township, city, county or state garages is not blue because it came from tropical seas. No, that would be too...
Why politicians don’t make great art critics

Congress has a lot of touchy issues to deal with these days, including one that boils quite literally beneath their feet. A painting, entitled “Untitled #1,” by former Missouri high school student David Pulphus, has been on display in the busy underground walkway between the Cannon House Office Building and the Capitol since June. But as...
Pulse nightclub shooter's wife, Noor Salman, appears in court
Pulse nightclub shooter's wife, Noor Salman, appears in court

The wife of Pulse nightclub shooter Omar Mateen made her first appearance Tuesday in a California court, one day after FBI agents arrested her on a pair of charges related to the deadly attack. Noor Zahi Salman, 30, is expected back in court Wednesday for her arraignment. She was apprehended at her parents' home in Dublin, California, where she was...
More Stories